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[Canada] Programme Tactical Armored Patrol Vehicle

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Ça semble mal se passer pour la TAPV à cet instant :

VICTORIA, British Columbia — The Canadian military's newest armored vehicle faces significant technical problems, with US company Textron being given a final chance to show its system can meet the promised levels of protection and mobility.

Textron's tactical armored patrol vehicle (TAPV) failed a series of tests in 2014, forcing the company to make design changes to the wheeled system it is offering Canada. A number of redesigned preproduction vehicles will be tested over the next several months and into the summer, a company official said.

But an internal Canadian Department of National Defence briefing paper pointed out that because of ongoing problems this will be Textron's last chance to produce a preproduction vehicle for the CAN $1.2 billion (US $1 billion) project.

Canada awarded the TAPV contract to Textron in June 2012. The company is to produce 500 armored vehicles, with an option to build another 100.

The deal would be worth up to $600 million for Textron. The firm also has been awarded a $105 million contract for in-service support for a five-year period.

The rest of the project funding would go toward new military infrastructure for the TAPVs and other support costs.

In 2014, Public Works and Government Services Canada, the federal department handling procurements, warned Textron that it had one more chance to sort out the technical problems, which mainly concern the vehicle's cross-country mobility.

Public Works spokeswoman Annie Trepanier said the department continues to work closely with Textron to resolve the technical issues and expects vehicle deliveries to begin in early 2016.

"We won't speculate," she stated, when asked what would happen if Textron could not meet its contractual obligations.

Defense analyst Martin Shadwick said the government could be facing the prospect of either canceling the contract or reducing the requirements so the TAPV could pass testing.

"The doomsday scenario would be to scrap it and start over again," said Shadwick, who teaches strategic studies at York University in Toronto. "But that would be a last resort."

A new competition would create additional costs and also create more delays in acquiring a new armored vehicle for the Army, he added.

Tom Williams, a spokesman for Textron Systems Marine & Land Systems, noted in an email that during reliability, availability, maintainability and durability (RAMD) testing "opportunities to improve vehicle subsystems before entering full rate production" were identified for the TAPV. The improvements have been made and a TAPV was recently delivered to the Nevada Automotive Test Center where it will undergo rigorous testing, he added. A second vehicle will be sent to the test center in May.

"Additional RAMD testing will take place this summer," Williams said. "Full rate production will begin in 2015 with first vehicle deliveries planned for 2016."

The problems with the TAPV are outlined in an Aug. 22, 2014, briefing for then-Canadian Defence Minister Rob Nicholson. That two-page report, obtained under the Access to Information law, pointed out that in 2014 the preproduction TAPVs experienced a number of significant technical issues, which particularly affected mobility. Those problems include issues with suspension and steering.

Textron implemented a number of design changes and modifications to address "systemic failures," Nicholson was told.

In July 2014, a test vehicle experienced another failure, which led to design changes and modifications. Another failure occurred that same month and a third in August 2014.

"These accumulating incidents, which relate to the vehicle's ability to travel distances on medium cross country terrain, led the project office to conclude that the existing test could no longer continue," stated the briefing, titled "Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle Way Forward."

"The cascading systemic failures indicate that the platform design is not stabilizing as intended, rendering the contracted reliability as unattainable."

In late August 2014, Textron informed the Canadian government that it was looking to make more vehicle design changes.

The Canadian Army was acquiring the TAPV because it needed a well-protected vehicle capable of negotiating tough terrain and providing troops with a cross-country capability.

The TAPV will replace the Army's wheeled Coyote light armored vehicle and the RG-31 patrol vehicle.

Joyce Murray, defense critic for the opposition Liberal Party, said the issue with the TAPVs points to a greater problem of an ineffective military procurement system.

She noted that the TAPV was one of several new armored vehicle projects announced by the Conservative Party government in 2009. Another of the projects, the planned acquisition of a close-combat vehicle, also ran into problems, with the competition having to be restarted a number of times. The procurement was canceled in December 2013 before a vehicle could be selected.

"The problems with buying armored vehicles for the Canadian military can be blamed on poor government management on the procurement file," Murray said. "They can't seem to get it right."

A Department of National Defence spokesperson confirmed that it and the Canadian Army are working with Textron to test the new TAPV designs.

Email: dpugliese@defensenews.com

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Ça y est. Les problèmes du train de roulement du nouveau VBRG de la gendarmerie TAPV canadien semblent corrigés

Textron Readies more mobile TAPV for Canada

By David Pugliese 2:59 p.m. EDT June 16, 2015

Deliveries will begin next year

635694360272763337-DFN-Canada-Textron.jp

(Photo: textron)

OTTAWA — Textron Systems said it has solved the mobility problems that had plagued the armored vehicles it will deliver to the Canadian Army, the result being a more advanced product that will be offered to the international market.

The Tactical Armored Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) to be delivered to Canada early next year is now the most advanced of Textron's Commando series, said Michael Gelpi, vice president of land systems for Textron Systems. The company is starting to market it to other nations, he added.

Defense News reported in April that Textron's TAPV failed a series of tests last year, forcing the company to go back and make design changes to the wheeled vehicle it is offering Canada.

"We did a true bottom-up systems engineering look and evaluated every single aspect," Gelpi said. "We're confident we have all of the issues licked."

The testing at the Nevada Automotive Test Center ended in late May, although additional tests are expected in coming months.

Canadian Department of National Defence spokeswoman Ashley Lemire said deliveries of the first TAPVs are expected to start in early 2016. Gelpi said that should occur in March but could begin sooner.

Canada awarded the TAPV contract to Textron in June 2012. The company, based in Slidell, Louisiana, is to produce 500 armored vehicles, with an option to build another 100.

The vehicle deal would be worth up to CAN $600 million (US $534 million) for Textron. The firm has also been awarded another $105 million contract for in-service support for the TAPVs for an initial five-year period.

In 2014, pre-production TAPVs experienced a number of technical issues, which particularly affected vehicle mobility, according to an Aug. 22, 2014, briefing report for then-Canadian Defence Minister Rob Nicholson. That two-page briefing, obtained under the Access to Information law, pointed out those problems included issues with suspension and steering.

Textron implemented design changes and modifications to address the problems but the issues continued. The problems were related to the vehicle's ability to travel distances on medium cross-country terrain.

The Canadian Army is acquiring the TAPV because it needs a well-protected vehicle capable of negotiating tough terrain and providing troops with a cross-country capability.

Gelpi said the test vehicle has been operated for 13,000 kilometers during testing.

The Canadian TAPV is known as the Commando Elite, the top of the line of Textron's Commando vehicle family. It has increased blast protection, a remote weapon station, an improved drive train, and what Gelpi called a "digital backbone" for vehicle systems monitoring and additional electronics if needed in the future.

He noted that since the US market has slowed, the company is focusing on international sales.

"We're getting a lot of interest in the Canadian version," Gelpi said, although he did not name the countries that have expressed interest. "It is by far the most modern [vehicle]. As a result of this experience, Canada is getting a very reliable vehicle."

More than 8,000 Commando armored vehicles are in service worldwide, including with militaries from Afghanistan, Colombia, Iraq, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand and the United States.

Gelpi said the company is expecting more orders for armored vehicles to come from Iraq's government as it builds up its forces to battle the Islamic State group. Iraq currently has 324 Commando variant vehicles and "they are interested in buying more," he added.

The coming months will see more testing for the Canadian TAPVs focused on reliability, availability, maintainability and durability.

The TAPV will replace the Canadian Army's wheeled Coyote light armored vehicle and RG-31 patrol vehicle.

The TAPV's problems have delayed the Army's fielding of the vehicles. Deliveries were originally expected to begin last September and be completed by mid-2016, Department of National Defence spokesman Dan Blouin said.

Gelpi said initial operating capability is now expected in June 2016.

He said Canada is putting in place a significant logistics and sustainment chain that would cover the next 25 years. Thus, it would make sense for Canada to consider other variants for certain missions. For instance, in 2013 Textron introduced its Commando mortar indirect fire vehicle.

Gelpi said the Army has not outlined yet any specific requirements for such a capability.

But in an April 7 briefing for industry representatives in Ottawa, Lt. Col. Rob Dunn, of the Army's directorate of land requirements, noted that the service is starting work on the requirements for an indirect fire modernization project.

Funding for such a project is expected to be available starting in 2019, he told industry officials.

Email: dpugliese@defensenews.com

Edited by Serge
  • Upvote 1

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Les livraisons vont commencer :

Citation

Canada’s TAPV in initial acceptance

26 July 2016 - 14:17 by Grant Turnbull in London 

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Canada’s TAPV in initial acceptance 

The first batch of Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicles (TAPV) for the Canadian Army are on track to be delivered next month, with the Department of National Defence (DND) conducting initial acceptance of the first vehicles.

 

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Quand l'AdT demande un VBMR "léger", c'est un peu ce type de véhicules qu'ils ont en tête ?

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De ce que j'ai compris, oui. Mais en plus léger.

Apres, le TAPV serait un mauvais candidat à cause de son arrangement interne médiocre.

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Oui. C'est tout à fait ça.

Si tu n'es personne à transporter, c'est convenable. Si tu as un vrais groupe, c'est impossible.

En ergonomie, il n'y a pas mieux qu'un cube unique avec porte sur arrière. 

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Quand on voit le commentaire de la vidéo de présentation et l'éventail des missions, on se rend compte qu'il s'agit plus d'une automitrailleuse que d'un camion de transport blindé.

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Première livraison :

Citation

First Textron TAPV armored vehicle shipped to 5th Canadian Division Support Base
Aug 12, 2016584
    

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Photo by 5thCanadianDivision


The first  Textron TAPV  (Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle) armored vehicle shipped  to 5th Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown of  the Canadian Army. That reported by 5thCanadianDivision.

Further, TAPV armoured patrol vehicles will go to units and 1 will be on display at the Army Run.

The Textron TAPV (Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle) is an armoured car currently in development for the Canadian Army. It is based on the M1117 Armoured Security Vehicle. Development began in 2009, and in 2012 the contract was awarded to Textron Systems, Inc. The first production vehicles are slated to enter service in 2016. An eventual 500 vehicles will be purchased, with the option to order an addition 100.

Révélation

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Révélation

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Photo by 5thCanadianDivision

Ils n'ont pas de surblindage. 

Une jolie série graphie "Gendarmerie Nationale", ce serait du plus bel effet.

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