Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Conflits territoriaux dans la Mer de Chine méridionale


Recommended Posts

Il y a 12 heures, BPCs a dit :

C'est également l'avis à l'EMM.

Ceci dit on ne sait pas ce que constituait ce test tellement important pour que les US envoient un U2 et un RC-135.

Or de mémoire   @Henri K.   avait posté pzrblebpassé sur son site un test DF-21D Vs vieux tanker donc en mouvement.

Donc il s'est passé quoi de plus ce jour-là ?

Deux points très importants que les gens ont tendance à oublier :

  1. La Chine n'a JAMAIS envisagé de couler un PA, ce n'est pas le but d'un AShBM. Il suffit de paralyser le pont pour qu'un PA ne représente que peu de menace, et se transforme au contraire en une charge pour la marine qui le dispose pendant un conflit.
    (Comment escorté un PA endomagé à quitter la zone de conflit, et, moins de problème diplômatique à gérer si le navire n'est pas coulé avec des morts mais uniquement un navire non utilisable pendant le conflit et avec moins de mort...etc...etc)

     
  2. YW-4 qui avait été coulé après le test en mouvement déplacait un peu plus de 20000t, pas un 100000t comm les PA US.

Henri K.

Edited by Henri K.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 3 heures, Henri K. a dit :

YW-4 qui avait été coulé après le test en mouvement déplacait un peu plus de 20000t, pas un 100000t comm les PA US.

Mais le fait que YW-4 ait été atteint montre la faisabilité d'atteindre une cible en mouvement, ce qui est récusé par les adversaires des AshBM.

Mais cela ne nous dit pas ce que ce test avait de particulier (et un site avisé sur la question reste lui aussi sans réponse) *

Tu connais sans doute ? eastpendulum.com ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

il y a 1 minute, BPCs a dit :

Mais le fait que YW-4 ait été atteint montre la faisabilité d'atteindre une cible en mouvement, ce qui est récusé par les adversaires des AshBM.

Mais cela ne nous dit pas ce que ce test avait de particulier (et un site avisé sur la question reste lui aussi sans réponse) *

Tu connais sans doute ? eastpendulum.com ?

Un test de validation, rien de particulier, ou alors tout est justement dans le "rien de particulier"...

Henri K.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Philip Davidson, amiral 4 étoiles de l'US Navy et antuellement le Commandant du Indo-Pacific Command, confirme il y a quelques jours à Halifax International Security Forum que la Chine a réussi à frapper une cible en navigation sur mer avec 2 missiles balistiques anti-navires. Et ces missiles, comme j'ai toujours dit, ne ciblent pas uniquement des porte-avions.

China’s military expansion will test the Biden administration

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/chinas-military-expansion-will-test-the-biden-administration/2020/12/03/9f05e92a-35a7-11eb-8d38-6aea1adb3839_story.html

Citation

Opinion by Josh Rogin, Dec. 3, 2020 at 5:50 p.m. EST

The tectonic plates of the military balance in Asia are shifting underneath our feet. It’s happening slowly and inexorably, but over time the magnitude of the change is becoming vividly apparent. As the United States prepares to change its leadership, China’s military advancement and expansion are now a problem too glaring to ignore.

Adm. Philip Davidson, who is nearing the end of his tour as the head of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, has been warning about the changing military balance in Asia throughout his tenure. But his warnings have often fallen on deaf ears in a Washington mired in partisanship and dysfunction. The Trump administration talked a big game about meeting the challenge of China’s military encroachment, but Davidson’s calls for substantially more investment to restore the regional balance that has deterred Beijing for decades have gone largely unanswered.

China’s military has moved well past a strategy of simply defending its territory and is now modernizing with the objective of being able to operate and even fight far from its shores, Davidson told me in an interview conducted last month for the 2020 Halifax International Security Forum. Under President Xi Jinping, Davidson said, China has built advanced weapons systems, platforms and rocket forces that have altered the strategic environment in ways the United States has not sufficiently responded to.

“We are seeing great advances in their modernization efforts,” he said. “China will test more missiles, conventional and nuclear associated missiles this year than every other nation added together on the planet. So that gives you an idea of the scale of how these things are changing.”

Davidson confirmed, for the first time from the U.S. government side, that China’s People’s Liberation Army has successfully tested an anti-ship ballistic missile against a moving ship. This was done as part of the PLA’s massive joint military exercises, which have been ongoing since the summer. These are often called “aircraft carrier killer” missiles, because they could threaten the United States’ most significant naval assets from long distances.

“It’s an indication that they continue to advance their capability. We’ve known for years they’ve been in pursuit of a capability that could attack moving targets,” Davidson said. I asked him whether they are designed to target U.S. aircraft carriers. “Trust me, they are targeting everything,” he replied.

Chinese missile and rocket forces now represent “a great asymmetry” in the region, Davidson said, that presents a threat along the first island chain, which stretches from the Koreas down through Japan to Southeast Asia and Taiwan. He has advocated integrated air and missile defense in the region and on Guam, which is strategic but vulnerable.

Davidson’s watch has almost ended. The Wall Street Journal reported this week that President Trump plans to nominate Pacific Fleet commander Adm. John Aquilino to succeed him. But before that change will likely take place, a new president will take office in Washington, one who is promising to review the U.S. strategic approach to Asia early on. What Joe Biden’s officials will find is that the PLA of 2021 is quite different from the PLA they last dealt with in 2016.

“Recent advances in equipment, organization, and logistics have significantly improved the PLA’s ability to project power and deploy expeditionary forces far from China’s shores,” the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission wrote in its latest annual report, released this week. “A concurrent evolution in military strategy requires the force to become capable of operating anywhere around the globe and of contesting the U.S. military if called upon to do so.”

Additionally, the commission warned, the PLA’s long-term strategy to catch up with U.S. military might includes advancing cyber, space and information warfare capabilities, often using the ostensibly civilian information systems that Chinese companies have built around the world. It is what Beijing calls “military-civil fusion.”

This means the incoming administration must develop a strategy for contesting China’s military expansion in the civilian space as well. The Trump administration has begun some of this work. The Justice Department is cracking down on Chinese scientists in the United States who hide their PLA affiliations. Trump has banned U.S. investment in 89 Chinese companies linked to the PLA.

The Trump team’s response to China’s military expansion has at times been inconsistent, unilateral and undiplomatic. These are things the incoming Biden administration can improve upon. But Biden officials would be wise to admit that the Trump team got the basic theory of the case correct, namely that the PLA’s expansion must be countered everywhere it shows itself, including in U.S. colleges and capital markets.

The Biden administration will find countering China’s military strategy, especially in Asia, to be a complex, costly and risky endeavor. But it has no choice but to embark on it, because the status quo is giving out. A good first step would be for Biden to nominate a defense secretary who understands the nature and urgency of the threat.

Dans un autre article paru plus tôt fin Novembre sur ce même interview, on lit :

Citation

“We've known for years that they were in pursuit of a capability that could attack moving targets,” he said. “I don't use the term 'carrier-killer,' and I don't think others should because it indicates that the Chinese are targeting a specific asset. Trust me, they're targeting everything.”

@hadriel Tu te rappelles de notre petite conversation ?

Henri K.

  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frapper un navire en mer, en mouvement, avec un missile balistique est une réussite technologique, ce n'est pas la première fois.

Reste à savoir si le navire avait une trajectoire prédictive ou s'il agissait comme une vraie cible: si la trajectoire était établie, cela revient à toucher une cible fixe.

En revanche, quoi qu'il en soit l'US NAVY va pouvoir exiger des moyens ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 weeks later...

Des drones chinois dans les eaux indonésiennes

https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2021/01/08/des-drones-chinois-dans-les-eaux-indonesiennes_6065613_3210.html

Un pêcheur a pris dans ses filets un engin bardé de capteurs. Cette découverte suscite un vif émoi en raison des craintes générées par l’affirmation de la puissance maritime chinoise dans la région.

Quand un pêcheur, Saeruddin, a pris l’engin dans ses filets le 20 décembre 2020, les caméras incrustées dans le nez de cet étrange tube d’acier à ailerons étaient, selon lui, encore actives. L’objet, pesant autour de 100 kg, que venait de récupérer le villageois indonésien de 60 ans au large de l’île de Selayar, dans la province de Sulawesi, a été présenté une semaine plus tard par un média local, detikNews : il s’agirait, selon les spécialistes militaires internationaux, d’un drone sous-marin chinois Sea Wing (« Haiyi » en Chine).

« S’il est vrai que c’est un Sea Wing, cela soulève de nombreuses questions sur la façon dont il a réussi à pénétrer profondément dans notre territoire », a noté le blog indonésien « Jatosint », en en diffusant les caractéristiques. Long de 2,25 mètres, muni de deux ailes de 50 cm, d’une hélice et d’une antenne, l’engin est un « planeur » autonome équipé de différents capteurs, capable de couvrir de très longues distances.

Sans aucun doute un drone scientifique ....

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 08/01/2021 à 20:20, Lezard-vert a dit :

drone sous-marin chinois Sea Wing

Je suis curieux de savoir comment ça marche un drone sous-marin planeur. J’ai trouvé un article d’Henri qui évoque des plongées jusqu’à 1000km, mais comment?

http://www.eastpendulum.com/6-329-metres-un-planeur-sous-marin-chinois-bat-le-record-de-profondeur

-en suivant les courants, ok mais dans ce cas on parlerait plutôt de bouée il me semble?

-en planant pour gagner de la distance horizontale (finesse) tout en plongeant (mais là encore : courants...)?

-à l’aide d’un propulsion (mais la taille de l’engin ne permettrait pas d’emporter beaucoup de batteries)?

Mais si l’engin a simplement dérivé depuis les côtes chinoises jusqu’aux eaux indonésiennes (en admettant que ce soit possible, je ne connais pas les courants*), ça aurait duré un bail et le drone serait plus sale il me semble (mais il peut avoir été nettoyé pour la photo)...

spacer.png

spacer.png

Bon, ben ce ne serait pas le premier repêché :

spacer.png

spacer.png

 

* edit: a priori, les courants ne vont pas dans le bon sens : sud>nord depuis la péninsule malaise ou les Philippines jusqu’à la mer de Chine (le Kuro Shivo), puis une boucle se forme pour redescendre vers l’asie du sud-est.

Edited by Hirondelle
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 2 heures, Hirondelle a dit :

-en suivant les courants, ok mais dans ce cas on parlerait plutôt de bouée il me semble?

-en planant pour gagner de la distance horizontale (finesse) tout en plongeant (mais là encore : courants...)?

-à l’aide d’un propulsion (mais la taille de l’engin ne permettrait pas d’emporter beaucoup de batteries)?

J'avais supposé que la différence entre une bouée et un planeur, c'est que le planeur peut se propulser le temps de rejoindre le courant qui l'intéresse avant de se laisser dériver dedans, ainsi sans doute que de choisir sa profondeur d'imersion...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il a une tête de "OUI OUI" ce drone...

après il a peut être été amené par un sous-marin voire tout simplement par un navire banalisé, laché à proximité il a gagné sa zone avec ses propulseurs puis et il tourne sur lui même, peut etre lesté pour rester entre deux eaux ... et fourni des informations que ces capteurs sont destinés à recueillir...  si tant est il n'est pas le seul et il y en a des dizaines qui font la même chose à intervalle régulier.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 3 heures, Hirondelle a dit :

Je suis curieux de savoir comment ça marche un drone sous-marin planeur. J’ai trouvé un article d’Henri qui évoque des plongées jusqu’à 1000km, mais comment?

http://www.eastpendulum.com/6-329-metres-un-planeur-sous-marin-chinois-bat-le-record-de-profondeur

-en suivant les courants, ok mais dans ce cas on parlerait plutôt de bouée il me semble?

-en planant pour gagner de la distance horizontale (finesse) tout en plongeant (mais là encore : courants...)?

-à l’aide d’un propulsion (mais la taille de l’engin ne permettrait pas d’emporter beaucoup de batteries)?

Mais si l’engin a simplement dérivé depuis les côtes chinoises jusqu’aux eaux indonésiennes (en admettant que ce soit possible, je ne connais pas les courants*), ça aurait duré un bail et le drone serait plus sale il me semble (mais il peut avoir été nettoyé pour la photo)...

En fait les planeurs utilisent des vessies réglables pour jouer sur leur flottabilité et leur centre de gravité.  Cela permet de faire des montées descente,  et d'avoir de la "portance" à la montée comme à la descente, pour transformer ces chandelles en vitesse d'avancement. C'est une mode de "propulsion" extrêmement efficace.

Par ailleurs tout le système est ultra optimisé pour limiter la consommation,  et des opérations de plusieurs mois sont possibles. 

  • Thanks 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Je ne connais pas très bien cette techno, mais a priori le réglage de la flottabilité se fait sur quelques grammes de déplacement (en déplaçant un piston ou en gonflant une vessie d'huile), ce qui ne nécessite que peu d'énergie (venant des batteries).

Quand à la vitesse elle est limitée à qq nœuds. Effectivement la navigation doit plutôt jouer avec les courants que contre ceux-ci...

Edited by bibouz
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,644
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    Mehdi2909
    Newest Member
    Mehdi2909
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.3k
    Total Topics
    1.4m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...