Serge

Évolution des protections balistiques americaines

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Serge    1607

Non.

C'est un problème de ricochet de la pression sur le torse qui se fait piéger sous la protection maxilofaciale en remontant. C'est pour cela que les américains travaillent maintenant sur un nouveau mannequin qui fera la mesure sur le torse avec la géométrie d'un gilet balistique. Ils n'avaient pas du tout prévu ce phénomène.

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g4lly    6288

Et pourquoi il insiste sur la pression sur le front et pas sur le reste du visage?! Et pourquoi il ont le meme problème avec les détonation a l’arrière?!

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Serge    1607

Parce que c'est ce qu'ils constatent.

En démarrant leur étude, il n'avait pas prévu l'effet du torse dans la propagation de l'onde de choc. Aussi, ils avaient réalisé un mannequin ne faisant des mesures que sur la tête et le cou. Maintenant, ils ont compris qu'il fallait aller plus loin pour comprendre.

Ils ont fait des changements de géométrie mais cela ne change rien.

Soit dit en passant, ce serait intéressant de constater qu'une telle solution augmente certains traumatisme.

Et j'en reviens à mon choix de l'Airframe qui est plus simple mais peut-être plus rentable. Et une petite photo de rappel :

airfra12.jpg

Modifié par Serge

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Serge    1607

Une affaire importante :

Army Gets a Bargain on New Camo Conversion Kits

Published on April 30th, 2015

Written by: Matthew Cox

IMG_4342.png

U.S. Army body armor officials have figured out a way to save a lot of money on IOTV Operation Camouflage Pattern conversion kits by recycling used body armor.

A team of product engineers, quality assurance representatives, logistics support experts and contracting personnel have developed a plan with the potential to save more than $150 million while providing soldiers with the best possible system, according to an Army press release.

Their efforts are now culminating in the first deliveries of more than 148,000 Generation III Improved Outer Tactical Vest body armor conversion kits that replace the outer, Universal Camouflage Pattern cover with a newer OCP cover at “at approximately half the cost of procuring new systems – $791 versus $413, the release states.

Nearly 400,000 of the older IOTVs manufactured in the Universal Camouflage Pattern, or UCP, remain in inventory and need to be replaced with the Operational Camouflage Pattern, or OCP.

A decade ago, as the nation waged war on multiple fronts throughout the globe, defense spending rose, and the Army acquired 1.7 million IOTVs, beginning in 2007. Many of those IOTVs are older models that lack soldier-driven improvements and may not be as effective in combat as the upgraded version.

A key part of the effort involves using existing stocks of soft-armor inserts. The team had to determine if those already in inventory or in soldiers’ hands would be usable in new systems, the release states.

That meant determining how long aramid-fiber, soft-armor ballistic packages really last. Industry provides a standard five-year warranty, but officials from Product Manager for Soldier Protective Equipment and Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support had anecdotal evidence that soft-armor, ballistic packages had longer shelf lives.

So the team pulled IOTV samples from multiple central issue facilities throughout the United States, representing the different climatic environments in which the IOTVs are stored.

The samples, some dating back to 2007 – were subjected to the same rigorous ballistic and fragmentation standards as when the Army originally accepted them, the release states. Results from the first round of testing showed the soft-armor ballistic inserts performed to standard.

With these results, the team raised the estimated shelf life from five to seven years.

The team conducted a second round to test even older soft-armor ballistic inserts – those with service entry dates as early as 2000, also from multiple CIFs throughout the country – to see if they continued to maintain full serviceability.

The team expects results from this second round of ballistic and fragmentation tests, conducted at Aberdeen Test Center, Md., to be available in late summer.

The tests conceivably could show that these inserts remain effective for up to 15 years, the release states.

With this new knowledge, the team used the consistent size and shape of the inserts to develop the Gen III IOTV Conversion Kit, which uses existing quantities of soft-armor inserts rather than buying new complete IOTV systems.

This strategy allowed continuous refreshment of technology through procurement. Instead of having DLA sustain the IOTV by procuring Gen II IOTVs in UCP, the agency will modernize at the same time as it sustains by procuring the Gen III Conversion Kits.

The effort has resulted in a cost savings of $56 million during the recent procurement of conversion kits and has the potential to realize more than $150 million in savings if the entire inventory is converted, according to the release.

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Serge    1607

Une nouvelle avancée :

Citation

army-combat-shirt-new-ts600.jpg
The Army's new Ballistic Combat Shirt, part of the new Soldier Protection System, is outfitted with soft armor to protect the neck, shoulders, high chest and high back. (Photo by Matthew Cox/Military.com) 

army-armored-vest-ts600.jpg
The armored vest portion of the Army's new Soldier Protection System. (Photo by Matthew Cox/Military.com)

army-combat-shirt-ts600.jpg
The Army's new Ballistic Combat Shirt, part of the new Soldier Protection System, is outfitted with soft armor to protect the neck, shoulders, high chest and high back. (Photo by Matthew Cox/Military.com) 

army-new-armored-vest-ts600.jpg
The armored vest portion of the Army's new Soldier Protection System. (Photo by Matthew Cox/Military.com)

Military.com Feb 11, 2016 | by Matthew Cox 

U.S. Army equipment officials are working on a new lightweight, body armor system that combines a plate-carrier style vest with an armored combat shirt.

The new Soldier Protection System is being designed to provide soldiers with as much as a 14-percent weight savings than the current soldier protective equipment, according to Col. Dean Hoffman IV, the head of Army's Project Manager Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment.

"This is a modular system; if you want to deal with weight, you have got to go super-low, light-weight, but we also have to be able to protect the soldiers," Hoffman said during recent interview with Military.com. "It gives commanders more flexibility, more options to choose the right level of protection to suit the mission."

The Soldier Protection System, or SPS, is a full ensemble that goes beyond torso protection and provides the soldier with improved protection for vital areas such as the head and face, Hoffman said.

Currently, the Army issues soldiers the Improved Outer Tactical Vest, or IOTV, which offers torso, neck, shoulders and groin protection against 9mm and shrapnel threats.

Rifle plates such as the Enhanced Small Arms Protective Insert and the X-Threat Small Arms Protective Insert offer different levels of front and back protection against high-velocity rifle rounds. Smaller versions of these plates can be worn on each side of the torso for additional protection.

The IOTV weighs roughly 31 pounds in size medium when it equipped with front, back and side armor plates.

The Army also issues the Soldier Plate Carrier System, a more stream-lined system designed to lighten the soldiers' load, especially during fast-paced dismounted combat operations. It averages just under 22 pounds with front, back and side armor plates.

The new Modular Scalable Vest portion of the SPS features a more streamlined design compared to the IOTV, similar to the plate carrier. Soldiers can wear front, back and side rifle plates depending on the threat level, Hoffman said.

It also features a new quick-release system that is much simpler than the QRS on the IOTV, Hoffman said.

One of the biggest challenges with the quick-release system on the IOTV was it relies on a complex system of cables, he said.

"You actually had to get training, and it was a pain to put together," Hoffman said.

The new quick-release on the SPS activates easily by pulling a special tab in the front causing the front and rear sections to separate and drop to the ground. Special cables are integrated into the Fastex-style buckles, making it easy to reassemble, Hoffman said.

The most noticeable feature of the SPS is the new Ballistic Combat Shirt, or BCS, which has been updated with soft armor on the neck, shoulders, high chest and high back to protect against 9mm rounds and shrapnel, Hoffman said. The lower part of the shirt is still a breathable, fire-resistant material.

"It is just a soft armor, almost like a concealable-body-armor-type material," Hoffman said, describing how this latest version of the combat shirt is designed to be worn beneath the vest to eliminate the need for the Deltoid Axillary Protectors, or DAP.

The Army developed the DAP system early in the Iraq war to protect the shoulder and upper arm from shrapnel wounds many soldiers were receiving from enemy improvised explosive devices.

But the DAP is also bulky and prone to snagging when exiting Strykers and other vehicles.

"So when you would come out, those [DAPs] would catch on something, it would pull you down and rip off," Hoffman said. The armor on the combat shirt "is all smooth, contoured … it gives you much more flexibility and maneuverability," Hoffman said. 

The new shirt also features a partial zipper closure and a mandarin-style color that is much softer than the IOTV collar that tends to rub and chafe on the neck, Hoffman said.

"We did the human-factors testing and everybody loved the shirt," Hoffman said. "At the end of the day, we want to provide protection to the soldier, but we also got to make sure he has the performance that he needs."

The goal of the SPS is to shave off 8 to 14 percent of the weight, Hoffman said, so at the most it would weigh about 4.3 pounds lighter than the average IOTV's 31-pound weight.

There is also an armored belt portion to the system which includes a male-female connector that attaches the belt to the vest in the back. The idea behind the concept is to help make the load more comfortable to carry.

Several companies have made these rigid-spine loadbearing systems but none have fared well in Army tests.

"When we did the initial human factors testing, this was the one thing that the soldiers did not like, so we have kind of gone back to the drawing board," Hoffman said.

For now, the Army plans to make this a separate effort from the SPS, so there is no chance of it holding up the program, Hoffman said.

But there is more to the SPS than just the vest and armored shirt, Hoffman said.

There is also the Integrated Head Protection System, which gives the soldier the ability to attach extra armor to the top of the helmet to provide additional protection against snipers shooting down on soldiers riding in an open turret, Hoffman said.

The system would also include an armored facemask to protect against gunfire and shrapnel, he said.

"We are keeping abreast of the current threats that are out there and making sure that our equipment is going to stop that," Hoffman said, adding that the Army recently approved a requirement for the effort.

The goal is to begin fielding the vest and BCS sometime in 2019 Hoffman said.

"We kind of did the proof of concept; we have proven that we can do it," Hoffman said.

The initial fielding plan is to issue the SPS to soldiers who are deploying to a combat theater, Hoffman said.

"This will probably not go to all the warfighters," he said. "Anyone who is being deployed and going into theater will always have the best equipment possible."

--Matthew Cox can be reached at matthew.cox@military.com 

 

Modifié par Serge
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TimTR    891

C'est marrant, sur certains aspects la description rappel les armures médiévales (12-14° siècle ?). Mixte de plaques et de mailles pour couvrir ou doubler certaines parties.

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Serge    1607

De nouvelles percées pour les matériaux balistiques :

Citation

Kevlar or plastic? New armor lighter, provides same protection

image.jpg
The new Torso and Extremities Protection system, which is slated to roll out in 2019 and has been undergoing field tests at bases across the U.S., weighs about 23 pounds -- 26 percent lighter than gear worn today.
Courtesy of PEO Soldier
 

By Seth Robson 
Stars and Stripes

Published: April 5, 2016

image.jpg
The new Torso and Extremities Protection system, which is slated to roll out in 2019 and has been undergoing field tests at bases across the United States. The light-weight plastic body armor will replace Kevlar-based protective equipment worn by U.S. troops. 
Courtesy of PEO Soldier

image.jpg
For lower-risk missions, troops can wear a ballistic combat shirt, which protects the upper back, chest, neck and arms, under their jackets. If a threat increases, they can add more protection, such as ceramic plates and a tactical carrier. 
Courtesy of PEO Soldier

Lightweight plastic body armor will replace Kevlar-based protective equipment used by U.S. troops in 2019.

The new Torso and Extremities Protection system, which has been undergoing field testing at bases across the U.S., weighs about 23 pounds — 25 percent lighter than gear worn today, said Lt. Col. Kathy Brown, a program manager for Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment at Program Executive Office Soldier.

“We are looking at further developing the system,” she said. “We think we can lose more weight.”

It’s unclear exactly how much the new gear will cost, however Brown said it will be cheaper than the current equipment and offer the same level of protection.

The new armor is designed to offer maximum flexibility and mobility, she said. It can be scaled up or down depending on the mission so troops working in less-risky environments can wear less cumbersome gear, said Doug Graham, PEO Soldier spokesman.

“You can look at your mission and wear as much as you need,” he said. “That will allow you to adjust the weight you are carrying to fit what you will be doing.”

For lower-risk missions, troops can wear a ballistic combat shirt, which protects the upper back, chest, neck and arms, under their jackets, he said. If a threat increases, they can add more protection, such as ceramic plates and a tactical carrier.

Over the past two years, hundreds of troops from U.S.-based Army and Marine Corps units have been giving their feedback after field-testing the new gear, Brown said. PEO Soldier did not provide Stars and Stripes access to those who tested the gear, but Brown said feedback has been positive. For example, 95 percent of soldiers who wear the ballistic combat shirt rate it highly, she said.

The key to reducing body armor weight has been changing soft materials from Kevlar to polyethylene — a type of plastic. The Army is also developing polyethylene helmets to replace the Kevlar versions, Brown said. Vendors have also dropped the weight of ceramic plates in the body armor by altering their manufacturing technique.

Lighter body armor will help troops avoid injuries caused by heavy loads, although it’s unclear how much more gear troops will carry in the future, Brown said.

“The Army is constantly trying to make soldiers’ loads lighter,” she said.

The Army is assessing exactly what type of equipment troops need for particular missions with a view of minimizing the weight they have to carry, she said.

The unisex body armor’s design also takes into account earlier efforts to make items comfortable to the female form, Brown said.

“We tried to make sure our equipment was all-encompassing,” she said. “Now we have a system that encompasses both male and female soldiers.”

robson.seth@stripes.com

 

Modifié par Serge
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Chronos    559

Ces "Ballistic Combat Shirts" rappellent quelque peu ce qu'on fait en matière de vestes de moto. On en voit pas mal avec des plaques ou des résistances cousues à l'intérieur ou dans la doublure pour contenir les chocs.

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g4lly    6288
41 minutes ago, Chronos said:

Ces "Ballistic Combat Shirts" rappellent quelque peu ce qu'on fait en matière de vestes de moto. On en voit pas mal avec des plaques ou des résistances cousues à l'intérieur ou dans la doublure pour contenir les chocs.

Ici c'est un "sous vêtement" genre anti coupure/piqure. Ça protège des "9mm ball" et des petits éclats. Pare dessus on passe un classique "plate carrier" avec au choix les plaques qui vont bien, devant, devant et derrière, sur les flancs.

Jusqu'a maintenant les protection balistique complémentaire aux "plaques" et au gilet, était des accessoire dudit gilet.

La on inverse le système. On colle le bouche trou balistique comme couche de base. C'est le porte plaque qui devient presque l'accessoire - même si en pratique on peu porter l'un sans l'autre -.

Ca a pas mal d'avantage au delà du simple poids. Ergonomiquement mettre la protection balistique dessous, le matos dessus, et la protection intempérie encore dessus, c'est bien plus efficace.

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Serge    1607

Ce n'est pas une nouveauté balistique à proprement parlé mais une nouvelle possibilité d'application :

Citation

Warrior East – Scubapro Helmet Dive Mask

Scubapro has come up with an adapter for their dive masks which allow them to be connected into Ops-Core’s ARC rail fitted to a FAST Helmet in a manner similar to O2 masks for MFF ops. This device really increases the versatility of the FAST Helmet.

img_4785.jpg

Here, it’s fitted to the Synergy Twin mask but the straps can be used with any of Scubapro’s masks with these quick attach clips. The strap can easily be swapped out for a traditional behind-the-head version when needed.

img_4787.jpg

Look for 4th quarter availability.

 

 

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