Serge

[Génie] Le contre-minage et la lutte anti-EEI

Recommended Posts

Je vous propose un nouveau sujet pour suivre ce qui se fait aux États-Unis en matière de contre-minage et lutte anti-EEI/IED. Que ce soit la prévention, la détection, la neutralisation et la destruction. Que ce soit tactique, organisationnel ou technologique.

Husky to get deep detection abilities

New technologies are in store for the mine-detecting vehicle.

Dec. 27, 2013

http://cmsimg.c4isrnetworks.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=M5&Date=20131227&Category=C4ISRNET08&ArtNo=312270011&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&Husky-get-deep-detection-abilities

The one-man Husky features ground-penetrating radar panels to search for IEDs. Under a new contract, it could soon have the ability to detect more deeply-buried threats. (Sgt. Earnest J. Barnes/Marine Corps)

Written by MICHAEL PECK

Non-Intrusive Technology Inc. has been awarded a sole-source contract to integrate deep buried detection abilities with the ground penetrating radar on the Husky Mine Detection Vehicle.

Under the contract with the Army's Project Manager Close Combat System, Non-Intrusive will also provide low-rate initial production of the A2 version of the Husky Mounted Detection System.

"HMDS-A2 uses an advanced, high performance GPR to detect both non-metallic and metal-cased buried threats, including IEDs constructed of bulk explosives and low-metal pressure plates," says the Army announcement. It provides "the GPR, deep buried detection and marking capabilities, installed on the manned and unmanned Mark III Husky, that enable detection of underbelly-attack explosive hazards during route clearance missions and weapons caches during area clearance missions."

Pour rappel, le Husky est un système de détection/marquage/déminage d'itinéraire d'origine sud-africaine.

La France avait acheté un lot sous le nom de SOUVIM avec un détail. Aucun contrat de maintenance n'existait. Conclusion. Ils tombaient en panne sans réparation possible.

Grâce à la pertinence du concept et en prenant en compte ses lacunes, la France vient d'adopter le SOUVIM-2 qui se décompose en deux éléments. Un de détection et un de déminage.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Alors au niveau organisationnel, les Etats-Unis ont créés en Irak en octobre 2003 la Task Force IED, chargée de développer des moyens techniques et tactiques pour lutter contre les IED. Cette organisation est devenue ensuite en février 2006 le JIEDDO (Joint Improvised Explosive Devices Defeat Organisation), qui emploi aujourd'hui plus de 500 personnes à temps plein. Voici le site, il y a pas mal d'infos dessus sur les technologies de contre-minage etc etc https://www.jieddo.mil/index.aspx

 

A propos de ce topic, je conseille le chapitre 11 "la bataille de la route" de l'ouvrage de Michel Goya Les Armées du Chaos.

Modifié par Redstone

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

JIEDDO To Change Name as Mission Broadens

Jun. 20, 2014 - 01:13PM | By MARCUS WEISGERBER

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon will keep its counter-IED office but broaden its mission to respond to terrorist and insurgency surprises on the battlefield, in addition to combating roadside bombs.

The Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization (JIEDDO) will also change its name to better reflect the new “integrated joint organization,” according to a Pentagon report sent to Congress this week. Defense News obtained a copy of the document.

“The Department has directed JIEDDO to transition the essential capabilities of JIEDDO to an integrated joint organization that enables tactical responsiveness and anticipatory acquisition to prepare for and react to battlefield [counterterrorism], [counterinsurgency], and other related mission areas including [counter]-IED,” the report states.

The report, which provides lawmakers an update on JIEDDO’s future, marks the first time the Pentagon has articulated the future role of the office, which was born over more than a decade of war in Afghanistan and Iraq.

JIEDDO’s restructuring plan will be developed over the summer but the final organizational structure will not be in place until 2017. However, the office will shrink dramatically in the coming years from more than 3,000 to approximately 975 personnel, the report states.

Also, the number of contractors used by the organization is expected to drop from a four-to-one ratio to a one-to-one ratio in 2015.

“We’re at a transition point, we know that,” Lt. Gen. John Johnson, JIEDDO director, said in February.

“JIEDDO has been very successful helping our military deal with a specific threat,” he said. “As we watch what’s going on around the world, we don’t see this threat diminishing.”

The Pentagon is expected to issue a final report on JIEDDO’s future in September.

Email: mweisgerber@defensenews.com.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Prise en compte de nouvelles déclinaisons de la menace :

Airborne IEDs could pose new threat

Aug. 4, 2014 5:20 PM

Written by JOSHUA STEWART

The next big threat to American forces might be a flying IED.

Officials are worried that proliferation of drone and improvised bomb technology means something as amateurish and cheap as a remote control plane could be turned into a low-tech but deadly weapon.

“If a hobbyist can do it, I might be facing it and I’ve got to pay attention to it,” said Navy Capt. Andy Arnold, chief of the capabilities assessment division of the Joint Integrated Air and Missile Defense Organization, as quoted in the Marine Corps Times. .

From July 27 through Aug. 8, he and others from JIAMDO immersed themselves in Black Dart, an annual event that evaluates the military’s ability to counter emerging UAS threats. The demonstration, held at Naval Base Ventura County and Sea Range, Point Mugu, California, focused on how joint forces can fight against a cheap, low-end UAS with deadly capabilities.

“It’s not a big warhead, but if you put it in the right spot at the right time it can do a lot of damage,” Arnold said.

The military doesn’t have a sensor or weapon specifically created designed to neutralize low-end, pint-sized unmanned aircraft, but Arnold wants to see existing hardware repurposed to counter the weapon. Black Dart included demonstrations of several aircraft engaging small drones. An AH-64 Apache helicopter outfitted with a modified Longbow radar and armed with a Hellfire missile, shot down a UAS in one demonstration, while a ship-mounted laser took out another.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

"Airborne IEDs could pose new threat"

J'en parlais dans le fil Israël il me semble. Il est aujourd'hui facile de faire des missiles de croisière avec des composant de "jouets" et de modélisme, y compris des engin capable de navigation autonome assez lointaine.

Si Iron Dome arrive a gérer les projectile balistique, je doute qu’Israël est une solution contre des solution de drone kamikaze de croisière, sauf des défense très ponctuelle. Meme les solution barrière doivent être assez compliqué a mettre en place vu la courte portée des "mine anti aérienne".

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Il y avait eu une étude de la RAND concluant que la dronisation d'avion allait être une solution low cost pour des pays pauvres.

Les drones Kamikazes type Fireshadow ne seront pas uniquement l'appanage des pays avancés.

La question du blindage du toit des véhicules va devenir aussi cruciale que le plancher antimine...

Rappelons que l'ETO pour un AUF3 prévoyait un toit pouvant résister aux bombelettes avec un Stanag 4.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Les pièces d'artillerie sont les premières à être visées par les moyens d'attaque artillerie de l'ennemie.

Pour le toit, en général, il faut voir ce qui existe depuis 1994 avec le Strv-124, le SPz-Puma, le kit réactif du toit du PzH-2000, le blindage de toit des CV-90 MkIII néerlandais, les Merkava-4 et 3 depuis 1994, les Namer...

Même le VBCI n'a pas un toit très fin.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Remotely operated Husky developed to enhance counter-mine missions

Helmoed-Römer Heitman, Pretoria - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

15 September 2014

1568358_-_main.jpg

The remotely operated Husky is externally identical, bar additional antennas, to the two-seat Husky 2G pictured here. Source: DCD Protected Mobility

DCD Protected Mobility has partnered with US companies Critical Solutions International and Torc Robotics to develop a remotely operated variant of its well-proven Husky mine-detection system.

The remotely operated Husky can be directly controlled by an operator up to 1 km away but can also operate autonomously using 'breadcrumb waypoint' navigation logic, with the operator setting a series of waypoints along the route to be cleared and the Husky then following that 'trail'.

If the vehicle encounters an obstacle along the route, it stops and notifies the operator, who can then take control. This could be the operator who initiated the mission, or an operator further along the route, the system being "controller agnostic". Various remote-control options are offered, ranging from something as simple as a gaming console to a kit with full steering wheel and controls.

The Husky's autonomous route is set using the Falcon View aerial image-based lineage programme, which allows the definition of checkpoints, rally points, and 'no go' zones, the latter ensuring that the vehicle does not stray into known high-risk areas.

The autonomous operation/remote operation system for the Husky has been developed since 2002, going through three demonstration models in the process: the US Army Ground Stand-off Mine Detection System (GSTAMIDS) fitted with ground-penetrating radar, GPS target location, and a mine marking system, two of which were built on the Meerkat vehicle; the SKILPAD (Tortoise) customisable vehicle, also based on the Meerkat; and the Route Clearance Platform Autonomous Control Kit (RC-PACK), demonstrated to the US Army at Fort Leonard Wood in October 2013, in manned, remotely operated, and autonomous mode.

The Husky can also, in both remotely operated and autonomous mode, be used with DCD's new Testudo remotely operated vehicle. The latter could be used to first identify high-risk areas, allowing a reasonably safe route to be set before the mine-detection process starts, or to neutralise any mines or improvised explosive devices (IEDs) the Husky detects. It can carry out some of its missions or accompany a Husky autonomously, with remote operation for the actual neutralisation of the detected mine or IED.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Programme pour télé opérer les Husky :

Remotely operated Husky developed to enhance counter-mine missions

Helmoed-Römer Heitman, Pretoria - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

15 September 2014

1568358_-_main.jpgThe remotely operated Husky is externally identical, bar additional antennas, to the two-seat Husky 2G pictured here. Source: DCD Protected Mobility

DCD Protected Mobility has partnered with US companies Critical Solutions International and Torc Robotics to develop a remotely operated variant of its well-proven Husky mine-detection system.

The remotely operated Husky can be directly controlled by an operator up to 1 km away but can also operate autonomously using 'breadcrumb waypoint' navigation logic, with the operator setting a series of waypoints along the route to be cleared and the Husky then following that 'trail'.

If the vehicle encounters an obstacle along the route, it stops and notifies the operator, who can then take control. This could be the operator who initiated the mission, or an operator further along the route, the system being "controller agnostic". Various remote-control options are offered, ranging from something as simple as a gaming console to a kit with full steering wheel and controls.

The Husky's autonomous route is set using the Falcon View aerial image-based lineage programme, which allows the definition of checkpoints, rally points, and 'no go' zones, the latter ensuring that the vehicle does not stray into known high-risk areas.

The autonomous operation/remote operation system for the Husky has been developed since 2002, going through three demonstration models in the process: the US Army Ground Stand-off Mine Detection System (GSTAMIDS) fitted with ground-penetrating radar, GPS target location, and a mine marking system, two of which were built on the Meerkat vehicle; the SKILPAD (Tortoise) customisable vehicle, also based on the Meerkat; and the Route Clearance Platform Autonomous Control Kit (RC-PACK), demonstrated to the US Army at Fort Leonard Wood in October 2013, in manned, remotely operated, and autonomous mode.

The Husky can also, in both remotely operated and autonomous mode, be used with DCD's new Testudo remotely operated vehicle. The latter could be used to first identify high-risk areas, allowing a reasonably safe route to be set before the mine-detection process starts, or to neutralise any mines or improvised explosive devices (IEDs) the Husky detects. It can carry out some of its missions or accompany a Husky autonomously, with remote operation for the actual neutralisation of the detected mine or IED.

(371 words)

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Salut.

Pour ce que je sais du déminage/depiégeage , ce genre de machine a un intérêt. Celui de la vitesse de travail et de la sécurité des hommes. De plus, ce que j'aime dans ces solutions, c'est la possibilité d'employer beaucoup d'outils.

La limite vient du fait que ces machines ne retirent pas la "matière active" du terrain. C'est à dire qu'elles peuvent casser des mines et pièges sans les déclencher, laissant de l'explosif sur le terrain. C'est la grande faiblesse du déminage mécanique par fléau. Ce problème n'est pas acceptable pour le sapeur qui lui retire tout ce qu'il trouve.

La pire des machines est le Keiler allemand. Lui expulse tout et projète des morceaux partout. Pour ouvrir un passage en offensive, c'est très bien. En revanche, quand vient le moment de dépolluer, c'est une catastrophe.

La seule dépollution qui vaille est la manuelle.

Modifié par Serge
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

JIEDDO holds competition for new Counter-IED Systems

(Source: U.S Army; issued October 3, 2014)

WASHINGTON --- This week at Fort Benning, Georgia, defense contractors are competing to provide the latest technologies to defeat IEDs.

The Joint IED Defeat Organization partnered with the Army Research Lab and the Maneuver Battle Lab, at the Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning, Georgia, to host a "Culvert Denial Challenge," which began Sept. 29, and runs until Oct. 10.

Ten teams are doing a surveillance challenge, and 10 are doing an inspection challenge, according to Matthew Way, a JIEDDO program integrator.

For the surveillance challenge, vendors make use of unmanned systems, micro-radar technologies, seismic sensors, and hyperspectral imaging. They are monitoring a culvert for an eight-hour period that encompasses day, evening and night hours.

"Once we've secured a culvert, we wanted technology that can maintain security over that area," Way said. "The competition really focuses on their ability to distinguish, per the solicitation, between nefarious activity and something that is benign -- just regular patterns of life."

Vendors in the inspection challenge are demonstrating potential solutions using quadcopters, ground robots, canines, and electromagnetic sensors. They are tasked with various scenarios such as difficult terrain, night inspection, and a long culvert that challenges communication links.

"We are really measuring how quickly they can get into a culvert area and tell me if it's clear or not clear," he said. "The second component that we are scoring them on is, once they've done that, how accurately can they identify particular items that may be threats in the region."

The bottom line is to protect the warfighter, Way said.

"We are confident that by doing this challenge we're going to find some technology that will either improve upon current systems or can be added or provide new capability to culvert IED problems," he said.

This challenge-based acquisition project promotes innovation, Way said, as vendors demonstrate their capabilities as they vie to work under an existing $49.5 million contract.

JIEDDO will decide its next step after the competition is complete and evaluations have been made, Way said.

He estimated a decision could be made approximately 30 days after the competition. At that time, JIEDDO could decide to move quickly on a technology, or even seek out improvements in a certain technology, he said. "We anticipate definitely moving on something, we plan to continue working this through 2015."

The surveillance teams are: Advanced Recon Corp, Applied Research Associates, A-T Solutions, CyPhy Works, EFW (Elbit), L-3 Communications, Niitek, Primal Innovation, QinetiQ, and Roboteam.

The inspection teams are: Applied Research Associates, ATSC (Inuktun), iRobot, K2 Solutions, Lockheed Martin, Pearson Engineering, QinetiQ, Roboteam, Science and Engineering Services, and Stolar Research.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Créer un compte ou se connecter pour commenter

Vous devez être membre afin de pouvoir déposer un commentaire

Créer un compte

Créez un compte sur notre communauté. C’est facile !

Créer un nouveau compte

Se connecter

Vous avez déjà un compte ? Connectez-vous ici.

Connectez-vous maintenant


  • Statistiques des membres

    5130
    Total des membres
    1132
    Maximum en ligne
    Kerloas
    Membre le plus récent
    Kerloas
    Inscription
  • Statistiques des forums

    20129
    Total des sujets
    1096208
    Total des messages
  • Statistiques des blogs

    3
    Total des blogs
    2
    Total des billets