Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Marine Britannique


Adriez
 Share

Recommended Posts

à équipement de détection égal

les plus silencieuses et celles qui auront les équipages les plus aguerris

2087: F 23 F 26

The Sonar 2087 was developed to provide the Royal Navy's Type 23 frigates with a more capable sensor for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) than Sonar 2031 passive towed array. Modern conventionally-powered submarines are dramatically quietest than their counterparts of previous generations which makes far more difficult to detect and track them by underwater sensors such as sonar. The S2087 project was launched in April 1994 with the aim to counter conventionally-powered (SSK) and nuclear-powered submarines (SSN and SSBN). In January 2001, Thales Underwater Systems was selected for development and production of the Sonar 2087.

Basically, Sonar 2087 has been designed to be a variable depth, towed active and passive sonar system which performs in conjunction with Sonar 2050 bow-mounted active sonar on UK's Type 23 frigates. S2087 uses lower frequencies of sound than those of sonar systems already deployed within the RN. Lower frequencies propagate farthest and better than higher frequencies which represents greater detection ranges. The operating depth of the S2087 sonar array can vary to optimize the performance of the system. Additional benefits come from extensive use of digital technology in signal processing and COTS hardware.

Overall, S2087 will be suitable for both deep blue ocean and shallow waters littoral environments from tropical temperatures through to artic waters detecting and tracking stealth submarines. Moreover, the systems has been specifically designed to integrate seamlessly with Sonar 2050, Surface Ship Torpedo Defence (SSTD) and Type 23 frigate command system (DNA(1)) with equal manning than required for operating S2031 and reduced life cycle costs.

In April 2001, the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) awarded Thales a contract for the development and supply of six S2087 sonar sets with an estimated acquisition cost of £340 million ($652 million). The initial operational capability aboard HMS Westminster (T23-class frigate) was expected by January 2007. As of July 2005, the MoD was negotiating with Thales the acquisition of further two S2087 sets.

UMS 4249 FREMM dérivé du précédent

Description: The Combined Active and Passive Towed Array Sonar (CAPTAS) is a family of long-range, Low Frequency Active Sonar (LFAS) systems developed by Thales Underwater Systems to support surface ship's anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capability. The CAPTAS towed Variable Depth Sonar (VDS) is well suited for detection of modern diesel-powered submarines in the littoral, deep and shallow water environments. Its range of performance levels, defined by the power of acoustic transmission and the gain of the receiver subsystem, enables integration onto a wide range of surface ships such as corvettes, frigates and/or destroyers. CAPTAS family also features a faired tow cable for optimum Towed Body (TB) depth control, COTS processing architecture and port-starboard non ambiguous discrimination on receive array.

The CAPTAS 4 (Combined Active and Passive Towed Array Sonar, 4 rings, for Surface Ship Underwater Warfare), also knwon as Type 4249 or UMS 4249, is a TB system with linear receive arrays in either dependent (towed behind the TB) or independent configurations which is an optimal design for shallow water operations. The sonar system accepts full passive and active operation modes. In active operation mode the CAPTAS 4 sonar covers a frequency range between 0.95 and 2.1 KHz and is fully compatible with built-in passive torpedo alert function. In passive mode the frequency covered is below 0.1 to 2 KHz. The towing cable and handling system have been designed to minimize problems due to surface layers. Sophisticated algorithms are used for coping with the reverberation conditions of shallow littoral waters.

The CAPTAS 4 sonar TB is 2x1x1.2 (LxHxW) meters with a weight of 1,250 kg. The towed array is 90 meters in length and 85mm in diameter with a combined weight of 2,490 kg. The handling system is 6.4x2.1x4.4 (LxHxW) meters with a weight of 15,000 kg. The UMS 4249 uses Omni-directional vertical line array of four free flooded rings (FFR). The heavy tow cable is 264 meters long and the light two cable is 500 meters long. The towed array sonar can be deployed or recovered within 20 minutes and has a maximum tow speed of 30 knots.

The CAPTAS 4 VDS (Variable Depth Sonar) low-frequency towed array was selected by the Navies of France and Italy, along with the Type 4110 hull-mounted sonar, as part of a complete sonar suite for long-range ASW detection onboard FREMM ASW frigates.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ex Thomson Marconi Sonar...  ;)

Sophia Antipolis pour etre exact

Les S2087 et CAPTAS-4 sont manifestement les memes sonars le premier etant markette par Thales Naval Systems (UK) et l'autre etant markette par Thales Underwater Systems (FR), les 2 fregates ont par contre une integration un peu differente, plus poussee apparemment du cote des type23 avec le couplage a l'alerte torpille.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thalès Underwater Systems dont le centre de recherche est dans les Alpes-Maritimes, cette société est une pépite de notre industrie de recherche

On va pas le refaire à chaque fois, mais pour un Brit, c'est un produit Thalès UK puisque même si le HQ est bien en France, il y a un site d’importance technique égale au UK à Templecombe (+ un site en Australie et au USA). L'historique de la compagnie est aussi le résultat de la fusion de plusieurs sociétés anglaises importantes avec les sites de Thomson FR (en 1990 puis en 1999 puis devenu Thalès en 2001 avec une partie de Marconi Undewater System revendu à BAE) donc voilà, c'est au minimum un produit multi-nationale puisque le développent de ces sonars à commencer avant les fusions des entreprises.

En VO:

Thomson Marconi Sonar (TMS) was formed as Ferranti Thomson Sonar Systems (FTSS) in 1990 by the merger of the sonar systems businesses of Thomson-CSF and Ferranti.

GEC Marconi acquired Ferranti's share of the business in 1995 to form Thomson Marconi Sonar.

With the merger of GEC's defence business Marconi Electronic Systems and British Aerospace in 1999, the resulting BAE Systems acquired Marconi's 49.9% share in TMS. BAE (through an options agreement) forced Thomson, renamed Thales, to purchase its stake in 2001. The company was renamed Thales Underwater Systems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Des britons sur mp.net commencent à stresser suite à une déclaration:

We are getting 48 F35B according to Hammond

"Re-iterating Britain’s commitment to buy 48 of the Fifth Generation planes, Mr    Hammond gave assurances that that engineering problems that have bedeviled    the Lockheed Martin jet were now largely resolved.  "

Just enough for the FAA use only then:)

from

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/defence/9410475/Philip-Hammond-shrugs-off-US-criticisms-of-Joint-Strike-Fighter.html

Well 48 is a good start but we do need to pressure the Government to budget post 2020 for a similar 2nd batch at least, 48 might be the bare minimum with the F-35C but with the F-35B i would prefer to see a greater number of airframes in both the Squadron and overall numbers as unlike the C the B has a far greater number of flight critical systems for STOVL flight which will result in lesser availability rate and longer serviceability periods. Ignore the LM guff on serviceability and maintainability we will get a clearer picture from USMC F-35B sea trials and operations on how much downtime to expect, but with a seperate lift fan, drive shaft & clutch coupled with 17 different servo controlled doors required for STOVL flight, those will have a detremental effect on availability of the aircraft at sea as it must have those items in full working order to operate at sea. Thats why i think they should up the Naval Strike Wing from 12 to 18 aircraft to ensure they have a credible air wing.

48?!

Some airframes will be stored (8?)

others for training & conversion (12?)

active airframes = 28(2Sqns?)

Obviously I'm speculating but we may only have 2 squadrons in frontline service.

In normal peacetime operations the QEC class would only have 12-14 airframes.

The Invincible class had 9 Harriers. Not a great increase in numbers.

We know the F35 is a huge improvement in capability but a limited number of airframes is going to place them under increased stress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

vu l'état d'incertitude dans lequel ils doivent se trouver concernant l'enveloppe à consacrer au F 35 B ils jouent la prudence et ils ont raison, d'autant plus que la somme a débourser et à prévoir sur 30 ans tient comptes de paramètres qui a priori sont loin d'être figés (armement, soutien, équipements divers ...)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Je comprend toujours pas que les britanniques, en lancant le projet CVF,  n'aient pas lance en meme temps de programme visant a succeder a leur harrier, un AV-8C ou un super-harrier (ca aurait juste fait doublon avec un autre SH  :P ). En tout cas, ca leur aurait permis de revitaliser un pan de leur industrie tout en coutant moins cher pour un engin repondant vraiment a leurs besoins... maintenant ils peuvent chaleureusement remercier uncle Sam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Voici ce que pense notre CEMM sur la Royal Navy

Comme je l’ai dit, les Britanniques ont encore aujourd’hui une marine de premier rang, mais ils n’ont plus de BPC comme les nôtres, plus de patrouille maritime et une RTC sur la chasse embarquée et les porte-avions.

Notre marine est crédible sur le plan international : elle est, comme la Royal Navy, l’une des rares marines de premier rang en Europe. J’observe cependant que celle-ci n’a plus l’ensemble des capacités que nous avons, la Grande Bretagne ayant repoussé la construction de son porte-avions à 2020, n’ayant pas des BPC comme les nôtres et plus d’aviation de patrouille maritime. Nous sommes donc la dernière marine possédant l’ensemble des capacités et donc, en quelque sorte, capable de représenter la puissance navale de l’Europe. Il faut en avoir conscience.

Ce problème est aggravé par le fait que, pour des raisons de construction budgétaire et de LPM, nous sommes entrés dans une phase de réduction temporaire de capacité (RTC), autrement dit de non-remplacement à temps des bâtiments vieillissants – les programmes étant décalés pour faire des économies budgétaires –, notamment des frégates et des patrouilleurs outre-mer. L’âge moyen de la flotte est de 24 ans. Son renouvellement, qui est prévu par le Livre blanc, va devenir un enjeu important dans la situation budgétaire actuelle. Plus on décalera les programmes, plus on aura des RTC et plus nos missions comporteront des lacunes.

En revanche, il faut aider nos amis britanniques, qui sont aussi confrontés à des RTC, à s’en doter d’un à l’horizon 2020, dans le cadre de la coopération que nous avons lancée avec eux. Il convient que l’Europe dispose d’une capacité de porte-avions permanente.

Mme la présidente Patricia Adam. Et polyvalente, en ce qui concerne les avions ?

M. l’amiral Bernard Rogel.

Cela aurait été un rêve que nous ayons les mêmes avions, mais le Royaume-Uni n’a pas fait ce choix. Ayons donc au moins un groupe aéronaval européen en permanence à la mer ! Si les Britanniques renonçaient à leur porte-avions, nous nous retrouverions seuls à disposer de cette capacité en Europe, avec une RTC qui ne sera plus temporaire !

L’opération Harmattan en Libye a montré la confiance opérationnelle que nous partagions avec eux, ce à quoi les accords de Lancaster House et les initiatives lancées dans le cadre du partenariat franco-britannique ont largement contribué.

Je rappelle à cet égard que pour mutualiser, il faut avoir une valeur d’échange. Or nous avons des capacités navales que nous sommes seuls à maintenir en Europe, ce qui limite les possibilités en la matière. Par ailleurs, les enjeux maritimes recouvrent souvent des enjeux de souveraineté. Le jour où l’on abandonne certaines capacités, il faut être sûr qu’elles ne sont pas nécessaires pour ces missions souveraines.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Je comprend toujours pas que les britanniques, en lancant le projet CVF,  n'aient pas lance en meme temps de programme visant a succeder a leur harrier, un AV-8C ou un super-harrier (ca aurait juste fait doublon avec un autre SH  :P ). En tout cas, ca leur aurait permis de revitaliser un pan de leur industrie tout en coutant moins cher pour un engin repondant vraiment a leurs besoins... maintenant ils peuvent chaleureusement remercier uncle Sam.

Ben une version du F35 était supposée avoir un moteur Rolce Royce et le programme était pas mal financé par eux aussi. C'était ça le remplaçant des harriers anglais et le Super Harrier de l'occident. Le premier harrier s'inscrivait déjà dans une coopération avec les USA, sauf que cette fois-ci la main est outre Atlantique, ce qui fait toute la différence j'en conviens. Bref si super harrier il aurait fallu produire, les anglais auraient du aller voir avec un autre, qui en exprimerait le besoin, large si possible. Et là ya que les USA, je crois (pas de France, elle finance déjà le rafale au strict minimum pour que ça reste rentable). À moins d'être maître d'oeuvre d'un programme à destination des italiens et espagnols et de se retrouver quand même concurrents avec un F35 à l'export, et tout ce que ça implique.

Les anglais sont juste plus capables de faire un avion tous seuls même s'ils disposent de nombreuses briques technologiques pour (moteurs, électronique (?), bureaux d'études).

Par ailleurs, les enjeux maritimes recouvrent souvent des enjeux de souveraineté. Le jour où l’on abandonne certaines capacités, il faut être sûr qu’elles ne sont pas nécessaires pour ces missions souveraines.

Avec du pétrole guyannais en approche, d'éventuels enjeux miniers sur sa ZEE, la pèche, la dissuasion et le reste, quelle mission navale n'est pas souveraine pour la France à l'aune de ces ambitions affichées ? Je sais que comme belge j'ai pas vraiment de légitimité pour l'ouvrir mais bon...

Quel autre domaine des forces armées peut encore payer l'addition pour la flotte ? L'ADT semble à flux hypertendus et l'ADA si elle devait vraiment pouvoir avoir des moyens adaptés aurait besoin de plus de financement (ravitailleurs, AWACS...) et ne peut assumer une réduction des commandes de sa chasse sans porter préjudice au remplacement de matériels plus vieux mais aussi au constructeur national qui développe un drône dont les opérationnels et ceux qui décident des sous ne semblent pas vouloir.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moins de F-35B et plus de F-35A ?

UK slashes F-35B numbers but might look to split buy with F-35As

UK Defence Secretary Philip Hammond has signalled a major revision to the UK's plan for procuring the Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF), with a sizeable cut in the expected number of F-35B short take-off/vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft purchased and the possible acquisition of a second variant: the conventional take-off and landing (CTOL) F-35A.

In remarks on 19 July in the United States, Hammond said the UK would order 48 F-35Bs to equip the UK's future carrier strike force. He added that a follow-on F-35 buy would be set out in a future Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR), with the aim of replacing the Eurofighter Typhoon in UK service.

Hammond was in the US to attend the handover of the UK's first F-35B (BK-1) at Lockheed Martin's Fort Worth facility. The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has confirmed his comments, telling IHS Jane's : "The defence secretary said that initially the UK would buy 48 jets for the aircraft carriers and announce at a later date what the final numbers would be. We will not finalise our decisions on the F-35 programme until SDSR in 2015."

http://www.janes.com/products/janes/defence-security-report.aspx?ID=1065969970&channel=defence&subChannel=business

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In remarks on 19 July in the United States, Hammond said the UK would order 48 F-35Bs to equip the UK's future carrier strike force. He added that a follow-on F-35 buy would be set out in a future Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR), with the aim of replacing the Eurofighter Typhoon in UK service.

Remplacer des typhoons par des F-35A :

Si ce n'est pas la mort de l'industrie européennes !!!

L'avantage avec les GiBi c'est qu'ils changent d'avis comme de chemises

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moins de F-35B et plus de F-35A ?

Et bien, si ca ne donne pas un avantage aux posteurs pro-Rafale sur le net  :oops:

Plus serieusement, je ne cracherais pas sur un petite explication de texte:

He added that a follow-on F-35 buy would be set out in a future Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR), with the aim of replacing the Eurofighter Typhoon in UK service.

Je suppose que le nombre de F-35a (si cela devient realite bien sur) va etre reduit, mais cela couperait l'herbe sous le pied de BAe pour la vente d'eurofighter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Non non, de chaque coté de la passerelle !

Je crois que sur les FREMM, au dessus du hangar hélico, à l'endroit où tu parles, seront implantés les Narwhal.  Sur la T26 il semble qu'on y trouve leurs 30 mm

edit :

d'autres visu

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Au mieux ça donnerais donc

13 T26,  6 T45, 7 SNA Astute et 1 QE. Ils s'en sortent pas trop mal malgrès la crise. Quid de la PATMAR ceci dit ?

A côté, en France on a :

11 Fremm, 2 Hzn (+2 Freda), 5 LFL, 3 BPC, 6 barracuda, 1 CDG. Ca me semble pas trop mal tout compte fait, avec des aster sur les FLF et hop ! Presque à égalité :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sauf que les Layette sont juste des gros patrouilleurs et que avant d'avoir des asters dessus il coulera du détergeant sous les pont...

Au maximum la France contera 13 frégates de premiers rang contre 19 briton, si du moins ils mènent  leurs programmes à fond, car en Europe un programme porté à fond tien de plus en plus du miracle...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

La Royal Navy « manque de marins pour embarquer sur ses sous-marins »

La Royal Navy pourrait avoir du mal à conserver assez de sous-mariniers expérimentés pour faire naviguer à l’avenir les sous-marins nucléaires d’attaque (SNA) et lanceurs d’engins (SNLE) britanniques, avertit un rapport interne du ministère de la défense.

Un rapport d’évaluation des risques révèle qu’« il y a un risque que la Royal Navy n’ait plus assez de personnel qualifié et expérimenté pour pouvoir respecter les plans d’armement en personnel de la flotte sous-marine. »

Suite : http://www.corlobe.tk/article30091.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Très belles vues des futures T26 Mat ;)

J'aime bien cette photo avec le HMS Ocean mettant en oeuvre l'Apache britannique (ils en ont  67) :

Image IPB

Oui en effet Bruno, la British Army possède un parc total de 67 AH64 Apache pour 48 Apache en ligne, mais lors d'Harmattan/Odyssée down sur le porte-hélicoptères d'assaut, ils y en avaient que 3 ou 4 Apache (les autres étaient en Afghanistan ou en maintenance) pour la Libye.Donc à méditer pour nous français qui serait tenté de réduire la cible des 80 Tigre à 60.

Pour les T26, une douzaine pour remplacer les T23...Les ambitions de la Royal Navy revues à la baisse.

Sauf que les Layette sont juste des gros patrouilleurs et que avant d'avoir des asters dessus il coulera du détergeant sous les pont...

Au maximum la France contera* 13 frégates de premiers rang contre 19 briton, si du moins ils mènent  leurs programmes à fond, car en Europe un programme porté à fond tien de plus en plus du miracle...

D'une.Ce sont des FLF classe La Fayette et non des Layette (petit coffre )

De deux, on sait très bien que les frégates légères furtives sont ce qu'elles sont, mais dès le départ l'Amirauté ne savait pas trop quoi en faire et ne les avait pas classées comme frégates de premier rang.Néanmoins, on voit bien que la Royal Navy et la Royale (MN) présagent une flotte de surface armée de 18 navires.

*On ne va pas se la raconter  :lol: ce n'est pas un conte de fée  =) le terme français c'est le verbe compter soit au maximum la France compte/comptera 13 frégates, ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Même si on a un peu moins de navires, on a des PATMAR (capable de tirer des exocet ou des torpilles) une chasse embarqué (rafale et E2C) et on a même 3 (contre 1 pour les britons) porte-hélicoptères qui peuvent théoriquement embarquer des hélicoptères de combats (si on les trouves)

La marine anglaise a bien 1 SNA de plus (et 6 plus grand) que nous ainsi que quelques frégates, mais ils le payent trop cher.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,809
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    O.livier
    Newest Member
    O.livier
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.4k
    Total Topics
    1.6m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...