Serge

[Blindés] La modernisation des AAV7-A1

Recommended Posts

Un nouveau blindage rapporté, de ce que j'ai lu, on parle aussi d'une amélioration de la résistance de l'engin face aux mines, avec un blindage ventral, un pare-éclats et de nouveaux sièges.

 

Je constate que la tourelle Cadillac Gage est conservée, je me demande aussi si ils vont garder les chenilles actuelles ou passer aux chenilles souples.

 

L'appellation AAV-7A2 me semblera plus qu'appropriée.

 

 

Modifié par Sovngard
correction orthographique
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Citation

Marines' aging amphibious vehicle fleet to get better armor, more power

By Lance M. Bacon, Marine Corps Time

635896726098975414-AAVSU-Event-245.jpg

Brian Fancher
The upgraded AAV will forgo shocks in favor of a new suspension system that uses rotary dampers and upgraded torsion bars, and raised the hull by 3 inches.


CHARLESTON, S.C — Marine Corps and industry officials on Jan. 28 unveiled an upgraded Assault Amphibious Vehicle that promises to add 20 years of service to the aging AAVs. The Corps will put the upgraded hog to the test throughout 2016.

The upgrades represent “substantial enhancements in both capability and survivability, aimed at ensuring the viability and relevance of the AAV fleet until they can ultimately be replaced,” said Bill Taylor, program executive officer for lands systems.


The AAV upgrade is centered on survivability. It replaces the angled Enhanced Applique Armor Kit with 49 buoyant, flat ceramic panels: 23 on the front and sides, and 26 thinner panels on the top. Each panel has four attach points and can be lifted by two Marines. Full assembly takes about 90 minutes. In addition, an aluminum armor underbelly provides MRAP-equivalent blast protection, while a bonded spall liner and armor-protected external fuel tanks allowed designers to install 18 blast mitigating seats in a carousel pattern (alternating high and low).
The need for better blast protection was evident in Iraq, where the AAV was unable to overcome the IED threat. This became painfully evident in August 2005, when 14 Marines were killed when their AAV struck a roadside bomb in the Euphrates River valley.
The addition of ceramic panels will add roughly 10,000 pounds, so each vehicle will get a VT903 engine that boosts horsepower from 525 to 675, as well as a new power take-off unit and KDS transmission.
“The old transmission is so bad that it is translucent. It has been built over and over again,” said Maj. Paul Rivera, AAV Survivability Upgrade project team leader. “If I threw on all that new armament, transmissions would have been blowing left and right and the engines would have been struggling.”


That’s good news for the crews who work tirelessly to keep these aging hogs up and running. Most AAVs are around 40 years old, and many parts are increasingly obsolete. In addition to more power and protection, crews will find a smoother ride. Shocks have been tossed in favor of a new suspension system that uses rotary dampers and upgraded torsion bars, and raised the hull by 3 inches.


SAIC is handling the upgrades, which run $1.65 million per vehicle. The Corps looks to beef up 392 personnel variants, which would provide lift for four infantry battalions (lift for another two battalions is expected by the Advanced Combat Vehicle). As it stands, low-rate initial production of upgraded AAVs is expected in 2017, initial operational capability in 2019, and full operational capability in 2023.


Many details, such as top speeds on land and water, will not be known until the upgraded AAV is run though myriad tests, officials said. Water and ground mobility tests were supposed to kick off in May, but officials are looking to get an early start since the program in on budget and two months ahead of schedule. Tests will be at a number of locations that span from Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to Camp Pendleton, California.


Brig. Gen. (select) Roger Turner, capabilities development director at Marine Corps Combat Development Command, said he was encouraged by what he saw. He lived out of an AAV for seven months during Operation Desert Shield, and has watched them age in the decade since. He was “impressed” with the integration of the new engine and transmission, and was “really excited” about getting the fuel tanks out of the crew compartment. Though initially unsure about carousel seating, he was a fan after a short ride around the SAIC facility. But a final thumbs-up will have to wait on developmental and operational tests.
“We want to shake it out good and make sure we are getting what we pay for,” he said. “At the end of the day, it is about looking those young Marines in the eye and making sure that what we’re buying for them and what we’re delivering is going to give them that crew capability.”


Ironically, the AAV survivability upgrade was unveiled almost five years to the day after the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle was canceled. That vehicle relied heavily on undeveloped or unproven technologies. The approach consumed billions of dollars, and the AAV fleet suffered as a result.
No more.
“We’re getting life back into our old hog,” said Rivera, who has been with the upgrade project since it started in fall 2014, and has been a part of the AAV family for 14 years. “All commanders know what our limitations are with our current platform. We’re now answering a lot of those shortfalls.”

 

Citation

Lance M. Bacon is senior reporter for Marine Corps Times. He covers Marine Corps Combat Development Command, Marine Corps Forces Command, personnel/career issues, Marine Corps Logistics Command, East Coast Marines and Marine Forces North. He can be reached at lance.bacon@hotmail.com.

 

Modifié par Serge
  • Upvote (+1) 2

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Le ‎12‎/‎10‎/‎2015à22:51, Serge a dit :

a45dcb62.jpgVoici ce à quoi vont ressembler les AAV7-A1 après la modernisation conduite par SAIC.

 

8349403.jpg

 

C'est AAV7 Ils m'ont toujours fait pensé à la deuxième version du Saint-Chamond de 1918 

 

La version 1916 porté le canon de 75 devant.

p406.jpg

  • Upvote (+1) 2

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Le nouveau surblindage me semble bien mieux intégré que l'ancien EAAK, et l'on ne se limite pas qu'aux flancs vu que l'on mentionne aussi le toit de l'engin.

Par contre la disposition des sièges, façon " carrousel " m'intrigue, en quoi cela consiste-il ?

 

 

 

 

Toujours dans la thématique de ce fil, une photo de la caisse d'un AAV-7A1 en Corée du Sud :

 

1454148686-8f2942718721d2be179f94a1b2e2f

 

  • Upvote (+1) 2

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 7 heures, Sovngard a dit :

Par contre la disposition des sièges, façon " carrousel " m'intrigue, en quoi cela consiste-il ?

Même interrogation. 

Il faudra aller voir dedans.

Il y a 7 heures, Sovngard a dit :

Toujours dans la thématique de ce fil, une photo de la caisse d'un AAV-7A1 en Corée du Sud :

1454148686-8f2942718721d2be179f94a1b2e2f

 

Ça me fait toujours rêver de voir de telles pièces.

En revanche, le plancher fait peur pour la menace mine.

Modifié par Serge
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 19 heures, Serge a dit :

Même interrogation. 


De même sur les forums anglophones.

 

Citation

Ça me fait toujours rêver de voir de telles pièces.

1454178206-d6dfa4dabc7696d59c49820313f0c

1454178420-49c07900b618ffb5327b9ef4f2a92

1454178230-7462ea46d723cd387bb4159882fb0

 

Citation

En revanche, le plancher fait peur pour la menace mine.

 

C'est d'ailleurs pour cela que le programme stipule qu'un effort sera apporté afin d'atteindre un niveau de protection se rapprochant des MRAP.

Il est à noter que l'AAV-7A1 revalorisé partagera son train de roulement ainsi que son groupe motopropulseur avec celui du Bradley.

 

Modifié par Sovngard
correction orthographique
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Le 30/1/2016à19:12, Serge a dit :

Même interrogation. 

Il faudra aller voir dedans.

La réponse à cette question ne s'est finalement pas faite attendre :


1454417785-7za2ir3.jpg

1454417785-fjipbpc.jpg

1454417785-snonpw7.jpg

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 15 minutes, g4lly a dit :

Terrible les sièges en quinconce verticalement!!!

Ça fait 18 places en tout? pour le compartiment arrière?

18 sièges en effet, contre 21 sur le modèle encore en service :

1454421317-aav-7a1-crew-compartment.png

 

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Just now, Sovngard said:

18 sièges en effet, contre 21 sur le modèle encore en service

Ça fait très peu de différence en nombre de place, c'est assez impressionnant comme performance. Je pensais qu'ils allaient devoir faire beaucoup plus de compromis pour installer des assise compatible avec la protection contre les mines.

Reste a voir le coté ergonomique des sièges a deux niveaux différent ... même s'il semble qu'il n'y ai que 30cm de différence et que de toute façon une fois assis c'est rattrapé en hauteur pas le repose pied ça doit faire un peu bizarre pour ceux du dessous d'avoir la tête sous les aisselles du voisin :bloblaugh:

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Superbe cette évolution :amusec: .

Moi j'ai toujours adoré le concept depuis les premiers LVT de la guerre du Pacifique et la s'est incroyable ce qu'est devenu le AAV :amusec: .

Les évolutions ce base sur des technologie éprouvées .

Par contre ,sa sera moins évident d'être en mode "tape" ouverte avec les sièges .Quoi que s'est un coup à prendre je pense .

Edit : sa peut-être intéressant la position des sièges décalé plus haut et plus bas  ,pour les mecs petits sa sera plus pratique  pour allé en tape .

Modifié par Gibbs le Cajun

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Il y a 22 heures, g4lly a dit :

Reste a voir le coté ergonomique des sièges a deux niveaux différent ... même s'il semble qu'il n'y ai que 30cm de différence et que de toute façon une fois assis c'est rattrapé en hauteur pas le repose pied ça doit faire un peu bizarre pour ceux du dessous d'avoir la tête sous les aisselles du voisin

 

Il y a 14 heures, Gibbs le Cajun a dit :

sa peut-être intéressant la position des sièges décalé plus haut et plus bas  ,pour les mecs petits sa sera plus pratique  pour allé en tape .

 

En espérant que les fantassins ne se disputent pas, tel des enfants pour la place du haut et du bas dans des lit superposés. :coolc:

 

  • Upvote (+1) 2

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
il y a 41 minutes, Sovngard a dit :

 

 

En espérant que les fantassins ne se disputent pas, tel des enfants pour la place du haut et du bas dans des lit superposés. :coolc:

 

Il faut prendre en compte un problème non négligeable pour les personnels en "tape" mais surtout pour ceux resté en caisse .

Les rations de combat ...

surtout les rations américaine ...

on l'oubli un peu trop souvent mais la nourriture des rations a une tendance à provoquer des pets bien puant...et s'est assez horrible comme odeur ...

J'ai le souvenir d'avoir subi et fait subir ce problème de pets bien puant en VAB .

Bon il faut prendre en compte que le AAV s'est 2 grandes tapes ,comme sur le VBCI d'ailleurs donc il doit y avoir une plus grande ventilation en comparaison des petites tape de toit des VAB .

On néglige un peu trop d'ailleurs ce problème de gaz intempestif que connait tout soldat sur le terrain .

Les joies du terrain en mode combat embarqué Lol !

  • Upvote (+1) 3

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Hé ben, on en apprend tout les jours, sur Air-defense.

J'ignorais ce problème de flatulences sous blindage.

Modifié par Sovngard
  • Upvote (+1) 2

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Mine de rien les retex de la guerre en Irak auront pas mal apporté en ce qui concerne la modernisation du AAV7 question protection .

Il faut dire que engagé ces énormes véhicules en combat mécanisé est assez impressionnant . Rien que la hauteur passe pas inaperçu.

D'un autre côté il y a une chose intéressante en ce qui concerne la hauteur s'est que dans le contexte de combat de rues dans les villes et banlieues , sa apporte une vue plus haute pour observer derrière les murets qui sont si courant autour des maisons individuelles irakienne .

Bon sa reste quand même dangereux des véhicules aussi haut mais il faut bien un compromis ,de toute façon ce véhicule a pour mission primaire l' assaut amphibie ,Donc si on compense le problème de visibilité par une meilleure protection on trouve le compromis qui va bien .

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Le type tout à gauche permet de bien simuler l'encombrement d'un Marine tout équipé. ça se trouve c'est son titre, "simulateur de Marine".

Sinon, je note que le Corps se prépare à faire de l'amphibie en milieu froid/arctic. Pa surprenant mais intéressant.

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Créer un compte ou se connecter pour commenter

Vous devez être membre afin de pouvoir déposer un commentaire

Créer un compte

Créez un compte sur notre communauté. C’est facile !

Créer un nouveau compte

Se connecter

Vous avez déjà un compte ? Connectez-vous ici.

Connectez-vous maintenant


  • Statistiques des membres

    5130
    Total des membres
    1132
    Maximum en ligne
    Kerloas
    Membre le plus récent
    Kerloas
    Inscription
  • Statistiques des forums

    20129
    Total des sujets
    1096208
    Total des messages
  • Statistiques des blogs

    3
    Total des blogs
    2
    Total des billets