Sign in to follow this  
zx

Radar pour suivre les avions furtifs

Recommended Posts

01-09-2017

Le ministère japonais de la Défense demande des fonds pour un radar capable de suivre les avions furtifs

http://www.opex360.com/2017/09/01/le-ministere-japonais-de-la-defense-demande-des-fonds-pour-un-radar-capable-de-suivre-les-avions-furtifs/

 

Les émetteurs d’opportunité émettent des ondes radioélectriques en basse fréquence et illuminent les cibles en trois dimensions. La probabilité de détection d’un avion furtif au moyen d’un radar passif devient donc très importante et constitue donc une solution très performante. »

 

En 2015, le Centre de recherche de l’armée de l’Air (CReA), l’Office national d’études et de recherches spatiales (ONERA), et le laboratoire SONDRA (qui réunit l’ONERA et l’école Centrale-Supélec) ont même testéun radar passif aéroporté à bord d’un motoplaneur Busard.

Edited by zx
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je suis pas sur que l'interprétation de l'article que ce sera des radars passifs est la bonne. Ca pourrait aussi être un radar en bande décamétrique comme Nostradamus, ça marche aussi pour détecter les furtifs. En plus ça permet de surveiller ce qui se passe dans les pays voisins. Parce qu'avec 50km de portée, le radar passif ça va quand même pas chercher bien loin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

voilà l'autre article auquel il faisait référence et quelques autres

Premier vol français d’un radar passif aéroporté, une technologie prometteuse pour la détection des avions furtifs

http://www.opex360.com/2015/10/29/premier-vol-francais-dun-radar-passif-aeroporte-technologie-prometteuse-pour-la-detection-des-avions-furtifs/

La furtivité des avions de combat est-elle pertinente?

http://www.opex360.com/2014/04/20/la-furtivite-des-avions-de-combat-elle-pertinente/

Citation

 

En clair, pendant que les ingénieurs des constructeurs aéronautiques planchent sur des technologies censées rendre furtifs les avions de combat (forme de la cellule, revêtement absorbant les ondes, etc…), leurs homologues spécialistes des radars travaillent quant à eux sur les moyens de rendre les systèmes de détection plus performants.

Ainsi, selon l’amiral Greenert, les capteurs futurs « fonctionneront des fréquences électromagnétiques plus basses que ce que les technologies de furtivité peuvent contrer » et la « détection se fera sous des angles sous lesquels un aéronef présente une plus grande signature ».

Et d’ajouter : « L’amélioration du traitement informatique permettra de nouvelles techniques qui pourront détecter des plate-formes furtives sur des aspects ciblés à partir desquels elles ont des échos radar plus élevés ». Et les radars à antenne active (AESA) associé à un ordinateur de gestion de combat pourront détecter « une partie de la plateforme furtive, le côté, le dessous, ou l’arrière » et « mettre en corrélation ces éléments » pour l’attaquer.

Même chose pour les radars dits passifs, « qui peuvent capter les ondes électromagnétiques produites par des émetteurs d’opportunité, comme les téléphones portables ou les antennes de télévision, qui rebondissent sur une plate-forme furtive à une variété d’angles. Avec un meilleur traitement dans le futur, ces signaux fragmentés faibles peuvent être combinés pour créer des informations de cible de poursuites », expliquait l’amiral Greenert.

 

 

Cassidian’s ‘passive radar’ remains invisible

http://www.airtrafficmanagement.net/2012/07/cassidians-passive-radar-remains-invisible/

New Radars, IRST Strengthen Stealth-Detection Claims

http://aviationweek.com/technology/new-radars-irst-strengthen-stealth-detection-claims

accès limité

 

Counterstealth technologies, intended to reduce the effectiveness of radar cross-section (RCS) reduction measures, are proliferating worldwide. Since 2013, multiple new programs have been revealed, producers of radar and infrared search and track (IRST) systems have been more ready to claim counterstealth capability, and some operators—notably the U.S. Navy—have openly conceded that stealth technology is being challenged.

These new systems are designed from the outset for sensor fusion—when different sensors detect and track the same target, the track and identification data are merged automatically. This is intended to overcome a critical problem in engaging stealth targets: Even if the target is detected, the “kill chain” by which a target is tracked, identified and engaged by a weapon can still be broken if any sensor in the chain cannot pick the target up.

Along with the multi-radar, truck-mounted 55Zh6M, NNIRT is offering the trailered, single-unit 55Zh6UME with VHF and UHF antennas mounted back-to-back. Credit: Bill Sweetman/AW&ST

The fact that some stealth configurations may be much less effective against very-high-frequency (VHF) radars than against higher-frequency systems is a matter of electromagnetic physics. A declassified 1985 CIA report correctly predicted that the Soviet Union’s first major counterstealth effort would be to develop new VHF radars that would reduce the disadvantages of long wavelengths:  lack of mobility, poor resolution and susceptibility to clutter. Despite the breakup of the Soviet Union, the 55Zh6UE Nebo-U, designed by the Nizhny-Novgorod Research Institute of Radio Engineering (NNIIRT), entered service in the 1990s as the first three-dimensional Russian VHF radar. NNIRT subsequently prototyped the first VHF active electronically scanned array (AESA) systems.

VHF AESA technology has entered production as part of the 55Zh6M Nebo-M multiband radar complex, which passed State tests in 2011 and is in production for Russian air defense forces against a 100-system order. The Nebo-M includes three truck-mounted radar systems, all of them -AESAs: the VHF RLM-M, the RLM-D in L-band (UHF) and the S/X-band RLM-S. (Russian documentation describes them as metric, decimetric and centimetric—that is, each differs from the next by an order of magnitude in frequency.) Each of the radars is equipped with the Orientir location system, comprising three Glonass satellite navigation receivers on a fixed frame, and they are connected via wireless or cable datalink to a ground control vehicle.

One of the classic drawbacks of VHF is slow scan rate. With the RLM-M, electronic scanning is superimposed on mechanical scanning. The radar can scan a 120-deg. sector mechanically, maintaining continuous track through all but the outer 15-deg. sectors. Within the scan area, the scan is virtually instantaneous, allowing energy to be focused on any possible target. It retains the basic advantages of VHF: NNIRT says that the Chinese DF-15 short-range ballistic missile has a 0.002 m2 RCS in X-band, but is 0.6 m2 in VHF.

The principle behind Nebo-M is the fusion of data from the three radars to create a robust kill chain. The VHF system performs initial detection and cues the UHF radar, which in turn can cue the X-band RLM-S. The Orientir system provides accurate azimuth data (which Glonass/GPS on its own does not support), and makes it possible for the three signals to be combined into a single target picture.

The higher-frequency radars are more accurate than VHF, and can concentrate energy on a target to make successful detection and tracking more likely. Using “stop and stare” modes, where the antenna rotation stops and the radar scans electronically over a 90-deg. sector, puts four times as much energy on target as continuous rotation and increases range by 40%.

Saab’s work on its new Giraffe 4A/8A S-band radars points to ways in which AESA technology and advanced processing improve high-band performance against small targets. Module technology is important, maximizing the AESA’s advantages in terms of signal-to-noise ratio. The goal is signal “purity” where most of the energy is concentrated close to the nominal design frequency, which makes it possible to detect very small Doppler shifts in returns from moving targets.

New processing technologies include “multiple hypothesis” tracking in which weak returns are analyzed over time and either declared as tracks or discarded based on their behavior. China is taking a similar approach to Russia, as seen at last November’s Zhuhai air show. Newcomers included the JY-27A Skywatch-V, a large-scale VHF AESA closely comparable to Russia’s RLM-M, developed by East China Research Institute of Electronic Engineering (Ecriee), part of the China Electronics Technology Corp. (CTEC). Two alternative UHF AESAs and a YLC-2V S-band passive electronically scanned array radar were also on show.

The CETC JY-27A Skywatch-V, China’s first VHF AESA, is in production for Chinese air defense units. Credit: Bill Sweetman/AW&ST

CETC exhibits indicated a focus on combining active and passive detection systems, including the flight-line display of a large-area directional, wideband passive receiver system identified as YLC-20. It appears to be used as an adjunct to the CETC DWL-002, which is a three-station passive coherent location (PCL) system similar to the Czech ERA Vera series, using time difference of arrival processing to locate and track targets. Also shown on a wall chart was the JY-50 “passive radar,” which operates in the VHF band.

Previous PCL systems, including Vera, are designed to exploit active emissions from the target. However, by teaming PCL and other passive receivers with active radars, the defender creates bistatic and multistatic detection systems, which may reduce the effectiveness of RCS-reduction measures that are primarily monostatic. For instance, highly swept leading edges are designed to deflect radar signals away from the source, but can create spikes detectable by multistatic systems.

Older and smaller VHF radars such as the NNIRTI’s 1970s-era P-18 are being upgraded by at least five teams: Retia in Czech Republic, Arzenal in Hungary, Ukraine’s Aerotechnica, and organizations in Belorussia and Russia. The -Chinese navy has retained VHF radar on its newest air warfare destroyers such as the Type 52C Luyang II and Type 52D Luyang III. The possibility of a more modern VHF radar appearing on the new, larger Type 055 destroyer cannot be ruled out.

The challenge to stealth posed by lower-frequency radars and other detection means has been acknowledged at higher levels since 2013. U.S. chief of naval operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert has publicly expressed doubt as to whether stealth platforms constitute a complete answer to the developing anti-access/area-denial (A2/D2) threat, and a January 2014 paper by the Center for a New American Security noted, “One recent analysis argued that there has been a revolution in detecting aircraft with low RCS, while there have not been commensurate enhancements in stealth.”

Boeing has promoted the EA-18G Growler’s ability to jam in the VHF band, which is built into the current ALQ-99 low-band pod configuration (the most modern part of the system) and the planned Increment 2 of the Next Generation Jammer system. Increment 2 will likely comprise an upgrade to the current pod—the best solution to emerge from an analysis of alternatives conducted in 2012. A contract should be issued in 2017 with initial operational capability in 2024.

A different kind of radar threat is the very-long-wave over-the-horizon (OTH) radar, typified by Australia’s Jindalee OTH Radar Network (JORN), Russia’s Rezonans-NE, and China’s OTH systems. Again, processing is the key to increasing the accuracy and sensitivity of these systems, typified by the Phase 5 upgrade to JORN.

OTH long-wave radars are inherently “counterstealth” because at very long wavelengths that are close to the physical size of the target, conventional radar cross-section measurement and reduction techniques do not apply. Claims by Jindalee’s original designers that the radar could detect the B-2 were published in the late 1980s and were taken seriously by the U.S. Air Force. At the time, however, the service could argue that OTH’s resolution was so poor that it could not represent the start of a kill chain. Today, however, that low resolution can be mitigated by networking multiple radars, and by using OTH-B to cue high-resolution sensors.

Outside the radio-frequency band, the U.S. Air Force (AW&ST Sept. 22, 2014, p. 42) is the latest convert to the capabilities of IRST. The U.S. Navy’s IRST for the Super Hornet, installed in a modified centerline fuel tank, was approved for low-rate initial production in February, following 2014 tests of an engineering development model system, and the Block I version is due to reach initial operational capability in fiscal 2018. Block I uses the same Lockheed Martin infrared receiver—optics and front end—as is used on F-15Ks in Korea and F-15SGs in Singapore. This subsystem is, in turn, derived from the IRST that was designed in the 1980s for the F-14D. 

While the Pentagon’s director of operational test and engineering criticized the Navy system’s track quality, it has clearly impressed the Air Force enough to overcome its long lack of interest in IRST. The Air Force has also gained experience via its F-16 Aggressor units, which have been flying with IRST pods since 2013. The Navy plans to acquire only 60 Block I sensors, followed by 110 Block II systems with a new front end.

The bulk of Western IRST experience is held by Selex-ES, which is the lead contractor on the Typhoon’s Pirate IRST and the supplier of the Skyward-G for Gripen. In the past year, Selex has claimed openly that its IRSTs have been able to detect and track low-RCS targets at subsonic speeds, due to skin friction, heat radiating through the skin from the engine, and the exhaust plume. The U.S. Navy’s Greenert underscored this point in Washington in early February, saying that “if something moves fast through the air, disrupts molecules and puts out heat . . . it’s going to be detectable.”

These detection improvements do not mean the end of stealth, in the view of most industry and government sources, but they do underlie current plans and discussions for the future applications of RCS-reduction and other stealth-related technologies. For example, the long debate over the appropriate level of stealth technology for the U.S. Navy’s Unmanned Carrier-Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike program has revolved around the development of A2/AD threats. The result is the end of a decades-long misapprehension, widely held in professional as well as public circles, that there is no major difference in stealth performance among various low-observable designs. 

Edited by zx
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 radars chinois différents qui équipent tous l'armée chinoise et en partie dédiés à la détection des engins furtifs :

  • JY-26, UHF, l'Institut 14 du groupe CETC indique que la version PLA de ce radar (2 fois plus de T/R et 2 fois plus de puissance W) déployée à Shandong a déjà détecté et tracé le F-22 en mouvement dans la péninsule de Corée

0Arh6Ao.jpg

  • JY-50, radar passif

h47cBCJ.jpg

  • YLC-8B, UHF

OwWLuGp.jpg

  • YLC-29, système passif

dhvxnHo.jpg

Henri K.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On en est ou des études d'utilisation des "grilles" d'antenne des téléphones mobiles 2G/3G/4G pour détecter les perturbations générés par le passage d'engin "furtif" ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Le 02/09/2017 à 16:16, Henri K. a dit :

4 radars chinois différents qui équipent tous l'armée chinoise et en partie dédiés à la détection des engins furtifs :

  • JY-26, UHF, l'Institut 14 du groupe CETC indique que la version PLA de ce radar (2 fois plus de T/R et 2 fois plus de puissance W) déployée à Shandong a déjà détecté et tracé le F-22 en mouvement dans la péninsule de Corée

Je suis sur téléphone je ne peux pas mesurer précisément mais cela fait au moins 600 km de portée nan ? :ohmy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 48 minutes, clem200 a dit :

Je suis sur téléphone je ne peux pas mesurer précisément mais cela fait au moins 600 km de portée nan ? :ohmy:

400 à 500 minimum, de mémoire.

Henri K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le plus fort est qu'ils savent que c'était un F-22 et qu'il volait sans sa lentille de Lüneberg. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 6 heures, DEFA550 a dit :

Le plus fort est qu'ils savent que c'était un F-22 et qu'il volait sans sa lentille de Lüneberg. 

Trop facile ! Zéro défi !!

Ils regardent la même zone avec leur super-radar anti furtif, et en même temps avec un radar plus classique à grande portée.

Si le radar classique voit un truc, ce n'est pas furtif ou bien ça porte un dispositif augmenteur de SER.

Si le radar classique ne voit rien, mais que le super-radar voit un truc, alors c'est nécessairement un avion furtif sans augmenteur de SER, donc un F-22 puisqu'il n'y a plus de F-117 et que le F-35 n'est pas furtif.

Ou alors, c'est un artefact de mesure. Mince !

 

Bon, on va dire que le super-radar a détecté un truc, et que les renseignements humains ont indiqué des mouvements de F-22 sur des plates-formes aéroportuaires correspondantes. Voila. Le truc détecté en vol c'est forcément ces F-22. Communiqué de presse, petits fours et tout le tremblement, ça marche aussi.

 

Oh, eh puis sinon, ils ont juste dit qu'ils avaient détecté et tracé le F-22. Mais peut-être à pleine SER avec augmenteur, finalement. C'est quand même vachement plus facile comme ça, et puis on n'est pas obligé de donner tous les détails qui n'arrangent pas le tableau. Mince, c'est de la propagande, quand même ! Juste une forme de caricature à visée politique et diplomatique.

 

(Je devrai arrêter de me faire l'avocat du diable quand DEFA fait de l'ironie, sinon je vais finir par me prendre une rafale)

Edited by FATac
orthographe et grammaire
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Provocation ... pas opérationnel, c'est aussi jouable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Air et Cosmos a mis en ligne son dossier paru dans son numéro du 17 avril dernier (le lien est au bas de l'article sur leur site web). 

https://www.air-cosmos.com/article/dfense-la-nouvelle-menace-des-radars-de-surveillance-trs-longue-porte-23136

Au programme : 

1/ Les radars Large Phase Area Radar (LPAR) :

-Voronej russes antibalistiques de 4000-8000 km de portée

-3D Nevo-UE et Nevo SVU mobiles VHF russes jusqu'à 400 km de portée

-JY-26 (2D) et JY-27A (3D) chinois (il n'est pas précisé si les installations de Huanan, Yinuan, ou encore Hangzhou disposent du/des même/s matériel/s)

-Kasta 2E2 russes et radar 3D mobile Matla Ul Fajr en Iran.

 

2/Les Radars Over the Horizon (OTH) :

-radar australien OTH-B de Jindalee (avec rénovation britannique BAE Systems pour le C2 et allemande Rhodes & Schwarz pour les récepteurs) de plusieurs milliers de km de portée

-radar Nostradamus français de l'ONERA sur la base 105 de Dreux, depuis 1998 de 3000 km de portée (de nouvelles configurations bistatiques récemment sous tests à l’Onera en auraient élargi de manière significative les performances).

-Deux radars OTHB chinois.

-radar OTH russe 29B6 Kontayner, susceptible de suivre plus de 5 000 cibles à 3 000 km simultanément, selon une couverture de 240 degrés et qui, pourrait évoluer à terme.


3/Les radars à ondes de surface :

-Français Onera et Diginext en 2006. Une nouvelle génération encore plus performante et compacte, basée notamment sur des antennes à métamatériaux et des technologies numériques, serait en cours d’étude à l’Onera. 

-5 radars russes NIIDAR Sun Flower « Podsolnukh E ». Sa portée pour l’exportation serait limitéeà 300 km, alors que le modèle russe porte lui à 450 km. Les cibles aériennes évoluant entre 3 à 200 m seraient détectées à 150 km, entre 200 à 5 000 m, à 200 km et, au-delà de 7 000 m, à 300 km (100 cibles simultanées seraient traitées, y compris furtives…). 

-les Chinois auraient acquis au moins quatre NIIDAR Sun Flower « Podsolnukh E » russes, pour les déployer face à Taïwan.


4/ Les radars Circulary Disposed Antenna Array (CDAA) :

-les soviétiques qui construisirent un réseau de plus de 30 de ces récepteurs, connus sous la codification Otan KRUG. S’il est difficile d’établir ceux qui en Russie disposent encore d’une activité opérationnelle, le Japon, l’Allemagne et le Canada ont également maintenu une telle capacité. Comme du reste les Etats-Unis, qui ont récemment développé l’AX-16 Pusher.

-en Russie, 3 nouveaux sites « KRUG 2 » ont fait leur apparition.

-Les Chinois ont également investi dans ces antennes de localisation portant à plusieurs milliers de kilomètres tout le long de leur frontière méridionale. D’autant que certains îlots artificiels pourraient accueillir de tels dispositifs pour repousser davantage encore les bulles d’interdictions.

-En 2018, les Iraniens aurait mis en opération 1 radar CDAA Sepher « Cosmos »,  particuliérement adapté à la détection des cibles balistiques et spatiales. 


5/Les radars « RESONANCE » :

-Depuis 2015, Moscou aurait déployé au moins cinq radars de ce type (version N améliorée, réservée à la Russie) qui seraient opérationnels sur le territoire russe. Deux autres devraient entrer en service opérationnel en 2020 .Ce sont des radars de surveillance 3D cognitifs (donc à évasion de fréquences et aux formes d’ondes facilement reprogrammables).  De 1 100 km pour les objets balistiques à 600 km pour les aéronefs (missiles de croisière, drones) en version export, et 350 km pour les avions furtifs… et ce sur 200 pistes simultanées. Plusieurs tests sur le minidrone en composite Orlan 3 auraient été menés avec succès. L’ensemble de sa structure est transportable, et son coût d’achat ne serait que de 15 M$.  Il serait doté d’une capacité de lutte contre les missiles antiradars, de calcul du point d'impact, et d'un fonctionnement en double fréquence pour échapper aux systèmes de brouillage adverses.

-L’Iran a procédé à l’acquisition de quatre exemplaires pour couvrir tout son premier cercle.

-Idem pour l’Egypte, qui dispose de deux Resonance NE.

-l’Algérie elle-même dispose d’un exemplaire qui rayonnerait du détroit de Gibraltar jusqu’à la Tunisie, en passant par le sud de la France.

-Une liste de clients qui serait susceptible de s’allonger grâce à Pékin.


"Par cette rupture, Moscou, en mettant en réseau ses clients étrangers, pourrait à court terme couvrir une grande partie des détroits stratégiques."

 

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Je reprends des remarques que j'avais faites sur C6 :

Citation

C'est quoi un LPAR (Large Phase Area Radar) ?

Edit : a priori l'auteur s'est viandé en voulant écrire Large Phased-Array Radar, soit "gros radar à antenne électronique" (alors que son gloubi-boulga aurait voulu dire "radar de zone à grosse phase").

Donc un gros radar, quoi.

Voronezh-m-radar-lekhtusi.jpg

"les Etats-Unis, qui ont récemment développé l’AX-16 Pusher", euh, il était en service il y a 26 ans ce truc : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a283263.pdf. Bon ca ne change pas la démonstration, passons.

Par contre, à ce que je comprends, le CDAA est une antenne réceptrice, un système de ROEM, donc parler de "radar CDAA" me semble abusif. A moins qu'il soit utilisé comme l'élément récepteur d'un radar, mais ça l'article ne le dit pas. Et ses "cibles balistiques et spatiales", elles émettent souvent en ondes radio ?

Et sinon, même en relisant, je ne comprends pas les principes spécifiques à un radar Resonance et ce qui est de ses simples descriptions techniques...

L'effet de résonance, il est différent de la réflexion normale pour les autres radars qui travaillent dans ces mêmes fréquences ? On dit qu'il est "hybride", mais dans la description technique je ne comprend pas en quoi. Le brevet de Dassault Electronique, il couvre quoi ?

Edit : l'intro de l'article dit qu'on va parler des radars en basses fréquence sur 30-300 MHz mais on nous sort (dans la partie des OTH) des trucs qui sont en-dessous.

Edited by Rob1
  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 1 heure, Rob1 a dit :

L'effet de résonance, il est différent de la réflexion normale pour les autres radars qui travaillent dans ces mêmes fréquences ? On dit qu'il est "hybride", mais dans la description technique je ne comprend pas en quoi. Le brevet de Dassault Electronique, il couvre quoi ?

J'imagine que c'est ce brevet :
https://bases-brevets.inpi.fr/fr/document/FR2706624.html?s=1590695661984&p=5&cHash=512a73f2445986e67a4bdc924ff9ba80

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 22 heures, Rob1 a dit :

L'effet de résonance, il est différent de la réflexion normale pour les autres radars qui travaillent dans ces mêmes fréquences ? On dit qu'il est "hybride", mais dans la description technique je ne comprend pas en quoi

Je crois que le Rezonans travaille à une fréquence plus basse que les Nebo qui sont dans la bande des 2m, le Rezonans serait plutôt dans les 6-10m, ce qui permet de faire entrer en résonnance des structures de 3-5m. Mais à part la bande de fréquence il a pas l'air d'avoir grand chose de spécial, la physique est la même pour tout le monde.

Pour les CDAA effectivement ils n'ont rien à foutre là, c'est du SIGINT pur. Pareil les radars "LPAR" c'est des radars d'alerte avancée balistique, c'est un rôle complètement  différent des radars OTH (même si il parait qu'on peut détecter des tirs balistiques avec Nostradamus...)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
Il y a 23 heures, Phacochère a dit :

@deltafan, je me permets de poster le lien pdf de l'article car parfois, on s'arrête au lien A&C de l'article. Tout ça pour dire que je n'y comprends rien mais que ça vaut le coup. (merci) 

https://www.air-cosmos.com/media/14435/download

Merci, tu as bien fait. Je n'avais pas réussi à mettre le lien direct. 

Je n'y comprends pas grand chose non plus... Parmi les radars mentionnés, le seul que je connaissais (depuis un bon moment), c'était Nostradamus. Mais quant à expliquer précisément son fonctionnement...

En fait, quand je poste ce genre de message sur un certain nombre de sujets (furtivité, armes hypersoniques, radars quantiques, …), outre avoir un minimum de références sur lesquelles m'appuyer pour me faire mon propre avis, c'est aussi pour lire les commentaires de ceux qui maîtrisent le sujet. Ca me permet (d'essayer) de me faire une meilleure idée de la réalité, ou pas, de ce que disent certains pays (en particulier celui de Vlad l'empaleur ou celui de Xixi Imperator) sur leurs maîtrises des ces techniques...

Edited by Deltafan
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
Il y a 22 heures, clem200 a dit :

Effectivement, ca correspond bien.

Reste que je n'arrive pas à voir sa particularité. Je le comprends (mais il est possible que je rate des trucs, d'ailleurs je cale dès qu'on parle des signaux somme et différence) comme un simple radar de surveillance, sauf qu'il est à antenne à balayage électronique et modulaire pour être compact et peu coûteux.

Il y a 2 heures, hadriel a dit :

Je crois que le Rezonans travaille à une fréquence plus basse que les Nebo qui sont dans la bande des 2m, le Rezonans serait plutôt dans les 6-10m, ce qui permet de faire entrer en résonnance des structures de 3-5m. Mais à part la bande de fréquence il a pas l'air d'avoir grand chose de spécial, la physique est la même pour tout le monde.

Donc un radar basse fréquence, comme un bon vieux P-15. Avec une antenne à balayage électronique et une architecture modulable. Des fonctions d'évasion de fréquences et de formes d'ondes comme ECCM. L'histoire de la polarisation m'échappe. Je ne vois toujours pas son aspect "hybride" et son histoire de détection en-deça du premier rebond sur l'ionosphère.

Il y a 2 heures, hadriel a dit :

Pour les CDAA effectivement ils n'ont rien à foutre là, c'est du SIGINT pur. Pareil les radars "LPAR" c'est des radars d'alerte avancée balistique, c'est un rôle complètement  différent des radars OTH (même si il parait qu'on peut détecter des tirs balistiques avec Nostradamus...)

Le thème étant "les nouvelles capacités de surveillance à très longue portée", je ne trouve pas la présence des LPAR complètement déconnante. Mais effectivement, la différence de rôles n'est pas bien mise en valeur.

En fait, l'intro nous embrouille. On était parti sur la "surveillance à très longue portée", mais on embraie dans l'intro sur les radars spécifiquement, et on nous focalise sur les mesures anti-furtivité.

- LPAR, OTH, ondes de surface, ça fait trois catégories de radars longue portée, on est dans le thème.

- Les CDAA peuvent entrer dans le sujet si on ne se limite pas aux radars, mais le sous-titre "les radars CDAA" laisse penser que les auteurs ne savent pas de quoi ils parlent (cela dit, le contenu est mieux que ce que le sous-titre laisse penser : il parle bien de "radiogoniomètre").

- les radars Resonnance (ou plutôt Rezonans si on transcrit le russe), si je n'ai pas raté un truc fondamental, ne serait pas une catégorie justifiée par un principe de fonctionnement particulier mais d'un modèle récent alliant quelques bonnes idées.

Bref, l'article manque d'un thème clairement défini et respecté. A se demander si A&C avait sous la main des paragraphes rédigés, mais que l'ensemble a dû être assemblé à l'arrache par le stagiaire.

Edited by Rob1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 9 minutes, Rob1 a dit :

Donc un radar basse fréquence, comme un bon vieux P-15. Avec une antenne à balayage électronique et une architecture modulable. Des fonctions d'évasion de fréquences et de formes d'ondes comme ECCM. L'histoire de la polarisation m'échappe. Je ne vois toujours pas son aspect "hybride" et son histoire de détection en-deça du premier rebond sur l'ionosphère.

Je pense que Rezonans a une petite particularité, c'est d'illuminer tout l'espace en permanence avec une antenne d'émission à faible gain, et c'est l'antenne séparée de réception qui crée la directivité en créant par calcul plein de faisceaux de réception séparés. Ca permet de balayer tout l'espace et de rafraichir la position de tous les mobiles à chaque pulse. C'est pas hyper utile pour le tracking vu qu'avec un balayage électronique intelligent on peut le faire bien plus souvent que la détection, mais ça peut avoir un sens en détection. Ou alors c'est juste moins cher vu que les composants en réception ne sont pas des composants de puissance et donc n'ont pas de problème de dissipation thermique et autres.

Mais souvent quand on lit des journalistes sur Rezonans ils sont babas devant la portée annoncée de 1100km et font des cartes avec des gros cercles sur tout le moyen-orient, alors que c'est juste la portée en mode balistique, ça a rien d'exceptionnel, un SMART-L arrive à 2000km sans pousser. Comme tous les radars non OTH ils est limité par l'horizon et donc à 300km pour les avions, et la portée de 600km en mode surveillance aérienne est juste l'horizon radar contre un missile hypersonique qui se balade à 40km d'altitude.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Member Statistics

    5,501
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    tomduri
    Newest Member
    tomduri
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    20,879
    Total Topics
    1,312,233
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    3
    Total Blogs
    2
    Total Entries