Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

L'Inde


Blacksheep
 Share

Recommended Posts

https://eurasiantimes.com/dassault-rafale-m-for-indian-navy-modi-meets-macronwhy-france/

 

Rafale Jets For Indian Navy! Why France Should Be Confident Of Winning Another Fighter Deal From Modi Govt.

EUROPEEXPERT REVIEWS

ByPrakash Nanda

November 30, 2022

Along with the technological prowess of the Rafale fighter jets, France would like India to take into consideration the factor of it being the most dependable Western ally while choosing the fighter aircraft for the Indian Navy’s aircraft carriers.

The two aircraft in the race include American Boeing’s Super Hornet or F/A-18 jets and French Dassault Aviation’s Rafale Marine.

The French strategy to cultivate India has seen a series of high-profile visits of French officials and ministers to the Indian capital and an impressive number of military exercises the French security forces have had with their Indian counterparts in the last few months.

And all this followed “the highly successful meeting “between Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and French President Emmanuel Macron in May this year.

As French Ambassador to India Emmanuel Lenain says, France wants to be India’s “best partner” in boosting its defense manufacturing and has decided to share the best technologies and equipment in sync with the growing “trust” between the two sides.

Incidentally,  French Minister for the Armed Forces Sebastien Lecornu has just concluded his three-day visit to India (November 26-28). Along with Indian Defence Minister Rajnath Singh, he co-chaired the 4th India-France annual defense dialogue in New Delhi on November 28. The two discussed various bilateral, regional, and defense industrial cooperation issues.

Calling the discussions with the French minister of armed forces “warm and fruitful,” Rajnath Singh, in a tweet, said, “Had warm and fruitful discussions with the Defence Minister of France, Sebastien Lecornu during the fourth India-France Annual Defence Dialogue in New Delhi today. A wide range of bilateral, regional & defense industrial cooperation issues was discussed during the dialogue.”

Ambassador Emmanuel Lenain said in a tweet that Rajnath Singh and Sebastien Lecornu discussed various issues, including Indo-Pacific, “Make in India” projects, and joint drills.

Lenain stressed that the two sides agreed to strengthen the defense ties between India and France and tackle common challenges and “to strengthen our defense coop in all areas crucial for strategic autonomy & tackling our common challenges.”

France is said to have committed to India for jointly developing aircraft engines, aircraft, submarines, and missiles under the “Aatmanirbhar Bharat” (self-reliant) route with Indian private sector participation.

 

It is ready to jointly develop and manufacture higher-thrust aircraft engines with Safran as a lead partner. It has also agreed to help India in the joint design, development, and manufacture of long-range submarines and missiles.

Lecornu also met with India’s National Security Advisor, Ajit Doval. Both shared close assessments of global and regional security concerns and agreed to intensify counter-terrorism cooperations in the Indo-Pacific.

This meeting was considered important as a precursor to the visit of Emmanuel Bonne, diplomatic advisor to French President Macron, for a “strategic dialogue” meeting with Doval that is expected in the first week of January 2023.

By the way, Lecornu’s India visit followed his colleague and the French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna’s three-day trip to India (September 13-15). She had met Prime Minister Modi, External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar, and NSA Ajit Doval and discussed bilateral, regional, and international issues of mutual interest. She had also traveled to Mumbai for engagements with industry leaders.

It is important to note that Lecornu’s sojourn to India included his visit to India’s first indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant in Kochi. In a tweet, Ambassador Lenain revealed, “In #Kochi, French Min @SebLecornu visits #IACVikrant.

He praised India for joining the club of nations capable of building aircraft carriers & highlighted the central role of naval cooperation in France’s strategy for the #IndoPacific.” On the INS Vikrant, Lecornu said, “France and India are united in their resolve to defend their maritime sovereignty and guarantee freedom of navigation in the Indo-Pacific region.”

The latest manifestation of the Indo-French resolve to safeguard maritime security was seen early this month (November 9-11) when the two countries had intensified their strategic engagement, with Indian Navy’s Boeing P8I and French Navy’s Falcon 50 conducting joint surveillance and ocean mapping of the Mozambique Channel, Mauritius, and South-West Indian Ocean.

The joint surveillance aimed to combat piracy, drug trafficking, arms smuggling, and the presence of extraneous powers on the eastern seaboard of Africa.

It is to be noted that joint exercises between the defense forces of France and India have been an important feature of the deepening security cooperation between the two countries.

Prime Minister Modi and President Macron noted in their May 2022 joint statement the importance of such joint exercises as Shakti, Varuna, Pegase, Desert Knight, and Garuda). These are “efforts towards better integration and interoperability wherever possible,” they had said.

 

The two countries had held their joint air force exercise involving 16 days from October 26 to November 12. The Garuda VII exercise was held in Jodhpur, in the western Indian state of Rajasthan. The Garuda series, it may be noted, had begun in India in 2003. It is being held alternatively in France and India.

This time, it involved the participation of a contingent of 220 personnel from France, with four Rafale fighter aircraft and one A-330 Multi Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) aircraft. The Indian side was said to have included the participation of Su-30 MKI, Rafale, LCA Tejas, Jaguar fighter aircraft, the Light Combat Helicopter (LCH), and Mi-17 helicopters.

 

Indian defense ministry’s press release also mentioned India, including combat-enabling assets like airborne refueling aircraft, AWACS, and AEW&C.

The Garuda VII Exercise followed the 20th edition of the India-France naval VARUNA exercise conducted in the Arabian Sea in March-April 2022. These exercises have been conducted since 1993.

According to the Indian Navy, the goal of the VARUNA has been “to enhance and hone their operational skills in maritime theatre, augment inter-operability to undertake maritime security operations and demonstrate their commitment to promote peace, security, and stability in the region as an integrated force.”

In yet another manifestation of the close naval interactions, Indian and French navies had undertaken a Maritime Partnership Exercise (MPX) in July in the North Atlantic Ocean.

They engaged in a replenishment at sea operations, followed by a joint air operation involving the “maritime surveillance aircraft Falcon 50 participating in multiple simulated missile engagements and air defense drills.”

Besides, in August, a contingent of the French Air and Space Force (FASF), including three Rafale fighter aircraft, made a strategically important halt at the IAF’s Sulur base in Tamil Nadu to a major military exercise, Exercise Pitch Black 2022 in Australia.

This was done per the mutual logistics support agreement signed by the two countries in 2018 to strengthen military cooperation.

Incidentally, in one of the most candid speeches focusing on the French view of India, French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna  has outlined various dimensions, of which three  are particularly noteworthy:

One, France, like India, is an Indo-Pacific nation with overseas territories in the two oceans (La Réunion, Mayotte, les îles Eparses in the Indian Ocean, New Caledonia, French Polynesia, and Wallis et Futuna in the Pacific, not to mention territories in Antarctica).

 

They account for 93% of France’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ), the second largest in the world. Around 2 million French citizens are living in the Indo-Pacific. Besides, France maintains a permanent military presence, with more than 7,000 personnel stationed in its overseas territories, Djibouti and the UAE.

India and France have a shared vision of international relations, the rule of law, and multilateralism. And both are committed to retaining their “strategic autonomy” at the highest level. If India is at the forefront of the strategic evolutions of the Indo-Pacific, so is France.

Three, the Indo-French strategic partnership is based on four “pillars”:  strategy: security and defense; economy and connectivity; multilateralism and the rule of law; climate change, biodiversity, and sustainable management of the oceans.

It is noteworthy that France’s steadfastness as a military ally contrasts strongly with that of the United States, which does not have a good record of being a reliable supplier of military items and technologies not only to India but also to its traditional allies during crises.

The US, in the past, had also vetoed or slowed components for LCA Tejas that India is developing. It had otherwise imposed an arms embargo on India following its nuclear tests in 1998.

Though things have improved of late, the US still has reservations about the technology transfer, particularly if India is engaged in a war with some country because there are US laws that prohibit deliveries of weapons and spares during wars.

On the other hand, there have been no such restrictions from France. Of course, all these strong features in its relations with France do not necessarily guarantee that India will eventually prefer Rafale to F/A-18 jets.

But France has a strong case.

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 1 heure, Blackbird a dit :

Rafale Jets For Indian Navy! Why France Should Be Confident Of Winning Another Fighter Deal From Modi Govt.

EUROPEEXPERT REVIEWS

"Il convient de noter que la fermeté de la France en tant qu’allié militaire contraste fortement avec celle des États-Unis, qui n’ont pas un bon bilan en tant que fournisseur fiable d’articles et de technologies militaires non seulement pour l’Inde mais aussi pour ses alliés traditionnels pendant les crises.

Les États-Unis, dans le passé, avaient également opposé leur veto ou ralenti les composants de l’ACV Tejas que l’Inde est en train de développer. Il avait par ailleurs imposé un embargo sur les armes à l’Inde à la suite de ses essais nucléaires en 1998.

Bien que les choses se soient améliorées ces derniers temps, les États-Unis ont encore des réserves sur le transfert de technologie, en particulier si l’Inde est engagée dans une guerre avec un pays parce qu’il existe des lois américaines qui interdisent les livraisons d’armes et de pièces de rechange pendant les guerres.

En revanche, il n’y a pas eu de telles restrictions de la part de la France. Bien sûr, tous ces atouts dans ses relations avec la France ne garantissent pas nécessairement que l’Inde finira par préférer le Rafale aux avions F/A-18."

Il convient de noter que çà ressemble à un avertissement de la partie indienne à la France et aux USA concernant son indépendance d'appréciation. 

  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 01/12/2022 à 01:53, Blackbird a dit :

Je discute régulièrement avec des officiers de l'IAF qui me rappellent quasi systématiquement deux points:

1. La France fournit des avions de combat à l'Inde depuis 70 ans (l'Ouragan) sans aucune restriction d'utilisation et avec une disponibilité opérationnelle excellente.

2. La France a montré un soutien indéfectible, efficace et déterminant à l'Inde lors de la guerre de Kargil en 1999. 

Le capital de sympathie dont bénéficie la France auprès de l'IAF et l'IA est important et s'accompagne d'un élément essentiel, la confiance.

Concernant l'IN, mes infos sont plus parcellaires mais néanmoins rassurantes sur l'avenir de notre coopération.

Dans quel cadre tu discutes avec des officiels de l'IAF ? Suis curieux. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

L'ASTRA va être intégré sur le Rafale !

https://idrw.org/indian-rafale-fleet-will-start-getting-astra-bvraams-post-2025/

 

et 

la comparaison rafale / F/A-18 est terminé

https://defenceforumindia.com/threads/know-your-rafale.32861/page-1049#lg=attachment184953&slide=0

mais pas forcément à l'avantage du rafale :

https://idrw.org/dassault-on-backfoot-on-indian-navy-deal-offers-more-upgrades/

Lecornu a probablement baissé les prix.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 41 minutes, Blackbird a dit :

Dans le cadre professionnel, en dégustant café et viennoiseries, en général ...

Tu sais que tu réponds pas vraiment à la question ... :dry:

Aller, réponds ! 

Bon... Du coup, c'est quoi le cadre professionnel ? Dans quel domaine tu travailles ? Peut être que les autres sont au courant mais pas moi:blush:

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 3 heures, bubzy a dit :

Tu sais que tu réponds pas vraiment à la question ... :dry:

Aller, réponds ! 

Bon... Du coup, c'est quoi le cadre professionnel ? Dans quel domaine tu travailles ? Peut être que les autres sont au courant mais pas moi:blush:

Moi je m'en fou juste

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.opex360.com/2022/12/06/la-marine-indienne-envisage-de-renoncer-a-son-projet-de-porte-avions-dote-de-catapultes/

 

La marine indienne envisage de renoncer à son projet de porte-avions doté de catapultes

PAR LAURENT LAGNEAU · 6 DÉCEMBRE 2022

L’été dernier, le porte-avions indien INS Vikramaditya, acquis auprès de la Russie, a été rejoint par l’INS Vikrant, un navire construit par l’industrie locale selon la même configuration STOBAR [Short Take-Off But Arrested Recovery], c’est dire qu’il est doté d’un plan incliné et de brins d’arrêt pour faire décoller et récuperer ses avions embarqués, en l’occurence des MiG-29K.

Selon les plans de New Delhi, l’Indian Navy devrait posséder un troisième porte-avions, appelé INS Vishal [Indigenous Aircraft Carrier 2 ou IAC-2]. Mais à la différence des deux premiers, celui-ci devrait être équipé de catapultes et de brins d’arrêt [configuration CATOBAR], à l’image de ceux en service au sein de la Marine nationale et de l’US Navy [et, bientôt, de la composante navale de l’Armée populaire de libération].

D’où, d’ailleurs, le programme MRCBF [Multi Role Carrier Borne Fighters], lequel prévoit l’acquisition chasseurs embarqués pouvant être mis en oeuvre depuis un porte-avions doté d’un plan d’incliné ou de catapultes. Au départ, l’Indian Navy voulait se procurer 57 appareils… Mais cette cible a depuis été revue à seulement 26. Pour rappel, le Rafale Marine de Dassault Aviation et le F/A-18 Super Hornet de Boeing se disputent ce marché.

Cela étant, comme il est question de construire un porte-avions de plus de 60’000 tonnes, pour un coût deux fois plus élevé que celui de l’INS Vikrant, soit plus de cinq milliards d’euros, le projet IAC-2 attire les critiques… certains estimant que les investissements qu’il exige seraient mieux employés s’ils étaient destinés à renforcer la flotte de sous-marins ou à acquérir des missiles de croisière supplémentaires.

Tel est ainsi le cas de l’Air Marshal M Matheswara, un ancien responsable militaire indien désormais à la tête de la Pininsula Foundation, un groupe de réflexions spécialisé dans les relations internationales. « Certains membres du gouvernement considèrent le troisième porte-avions comme un ‘éléphant blanc’ terriblement cher. Ils soutiennent que l’Inde peut difficilement se permettre de telles dépenses sur une seule plate-forme alors que de nombreuses autres exigences exigent une attention immédiate », avait-il fait valoir, en octobre 2020. Et de faire observer que la construction de cet IAC-2 prendrait beaucoup trop de temps…

Cependant, l’Indian Navy estime qu’elle a besoin de trois porte-avions, afin de pouvoir disposer de deux groupes aéronavals prêts à appareiller à tout moment. Il s’agirait ainsi de pouvoir répondre aux activités des forces navales pakistanaises et chinoises dans les environs de l’Inde et de prendre en compte l’importance sans cesse croissante des enjeux maritimes.

Sur ce point, à l’occasion d’une conférence de presse donnée à la veille de la journée de la marine, la semaine passée, le chef d’état-major de l’Indian Navy, l’amiral R. Hari Kumar, a affirmé qu’il y avait en permanence entre quatre et six navires militaires de l’APL nois dans la région de l’océan Indien, sans compter « quelques navires de recherche » et un « grand nombre de bateaux de pêche » chinois, qui ne font pas toujours qu’appâter le poisson.

« Notre travail consiste à veiller à ce que les intérêts de l’Inde dans le domaine maritime soient protégés. Et à cet égard, nous les surveillons et les suivons de près », a souligné l’amiral Kumar.

En tout cas, il n’est pas question pour l’Indian Navy de faire une croix sur son troisième porte-avions… En revanche, elle va réduire sans ambitions. S’agissant de l’IAC-2, « nous travaillons toujours sur sa taille et ses capacités », a répondu l’amiral Kumar à une question sur ce sujet. Mais « pour l’instant, nous l’avons suspendu car nous venons de mettre en service l’INS Vikrant, dont nous sommes assez satisfaits », a-t-il ajouté.

Aussi, a conclu le chef de l’Indian Navy, « nous regardons si nous devrions pas envisager la commande d’un autre IAC-1 », c’est à dire d’un porte-avions similaire à l’INS Vikrant. Cependant, aucune décision n’a été prise pour le moment, a-t-il dit, après avoir souligné que la construction de l’INS Vikrant avait permis d’acquérir « beaucoup de savoir-faire » et conduit à la « création d’un grand nombre de moyennes entreprises ».

Quant au programme MRCBF, l’amiral Kumar a indiqué que les rapports établis à la suite des évaluations du Rafale Marine et du F/A-18 Super Hornet étaient toujours en cours d’examen. Mais pour lui, « l’avenir de l’aviation navale indienne est le TEDBF [Twin Engine Deck Based Fighter], un chasseur embarqué en cours de développement chez Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd [HAL]. « Un prototype est attendu d’ici 2026-27 et la production devrait commencer vers 2032 », a-t-il avancé.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 19 minutes, Blackbird a dit :

il n’est pas question pour l’Indian Navy de faire une croix sur son troisième porte-avions  ... nous regardons si nous devrions pas envisager la commande d’un autre IAC-1 

Ce serait raisonnable côté indien. Cela n'enlève pas l'intérêt de remplacer les Mig-29 ... TEDBF : il faut bien que l'Inde rêve à son indépendance technologique... En attendant  ! Rafale M garde ses chances

Link to comment
Share on other sites

France’s Rafale jets are frontrunner in race for Indian Navy contract

Les avions à réaction français Rafale sont en tête de la course pour le contrat de la marine indienne.

L'avancée de la marine indienne signifie que la proposition d'acquérir davantage de jets Rafale pour l'IAF devrait également s'accélérer.

Le Rafale-M de l'avionneur français Dassault Aviation s'est imposé comme le favori pour décrocher un méga contrat de 27 chasseurs auprès de la marine indienne, a appris ThePrint, laissant derrière lui le F/A-18 Super Hornet de l'américain Boeing.

Selon des sources de l'establishment de la défense et de la sécurité, la marine a soumis un rapport détaillé au ministère de la défense sur les performances des Super Hornet et du Rafale-M, qui est la version marine de l'avion de combat déjà utilisé par l'Indian Air Force, au cours de deux séries de démonstrations.

La société américaine Boeing et le constructeur français Dassault Aviation ont effectué des démonstrations opérationnelles des Super Hornets et du Rafale-M respectivement, en présentant des sauts à ski - une capacité de décollage cruciale - depuis l'installation d'essai à terre de l'INS Hansa à Goa, afin de démontrer leur capacité à opérer à partir des porte-avions indiens.

Refusant d'entrer dans les détails, des sources ont déclaré que le rapport du quartier général de la marine au ministère de la défense ne mentionne que les "points positifs", et que le Rafale-M remplit tous les critères.

Le rapport au ministère de la défense a été envoyé après une analyse détaillée par le quartier général de la marine sur les performances des deux avions. Ceux qui ont entrepris les tests ont préparé un "rapport d'essai" qui a été envoyé au quartier général de la marine pour une analyse détaillée des performances et la sélection des avions.

À la question de savoir si la taille du porte-avions indien INS Vikrant serait un problème, les sources ont répondu que les deux avions devaient être soulevés et abaissés selon un certain angle.

Bien que les ailes des Super Hornets se replient - contrairement au Rafale - elles doivent toujours être soulevées et abaissées selon un certain angle. Les deux avions disposent également d'un processus distinct au cours duquel les ailes se replient.

La conception et l'espace de la taille de l'appareil ont posé problème car il est entendu qu'il a été conçu en tenant compte du MiG 29K et de la version navale de l'avion Tejas.

La marine exploite actuellement l'avion russe MiG 29K depuis l'INS Vikramaditya. Mais avec la mise en service de l'INS Vikrant, la force a cherché à obtenir davantage d'avions de combat.

Le nouveau contrat est censé être un arrangement provisoire car la marine mise sur son avion de combat indigène. Le chef de la marine, l'amiral Hari Kumar, a déclaré samedi que l'avenir de l'aéronavale indienne était le chasseur indigène Twin Engine Deck Based Fighter (TEDBF), dont le prototype est attendu pour 2026-27 et dont la production devrait commencer vers 2032.

Il a également déclaré que le chasseur naval existant, le MiG 29K, était en nombre limité et que les fournitures de rechange russes n'étaient "pas non plus très nombreuses".

Des chasseurs pour l'IAF

Des sources ont déclaré que la balle était maintenant dans le camp du ministère de la défense qui décidera de la suite des opérations. Elles ont ajouté que le contrat est susceptible d'être un accord de gouvernement à gouvernement tout comme la commande précédente pour les jets Rafale de l'IAF.

On apprend que les Français ont proposé de transférer certains avions de leur propre flotte navale afin que la marine indienne puisse les utiliser plus rapidement. Cependant, tous les chasseurs seront probablement achetés sur étagère.

Des sources ont expliqué que l'avancée de la marine indienne signifierait que la proposition d'acquérir davantage de jets Rafale pour l'IAF est également susceptible de s'accélérer. Cela s'explique par le fait qu'il serait plus prudent, d'un point de vue financier, de disposer d'un plus grand nombre d'avions, ce qui permettrait de réduire les coûts.

Comme l'a rapporté ThePrint précédemment, le gouvernement envisage de diviser le méga marché de 114 avions de combat multirôles (MRFA) pour l'IAF. Au lieu d'acquérir 114 chasseurs en une seule fois, comme cela était prévu auparavant, le gouvernement envisage de passer une commande initiale de 54 appareils pour l'IAF.

Cela impliquerait que 18 avions soient achetés sur étagère auprès d'un fabricant d'équipement d'origine (OEM) étranger et que 36 soient construits en Inde par le biais d'une coentreprise dans le cadre du programme "Make In India".

Il s'agit d'une commande qui sera passée directement auprès de l'équipementier étranger. Une commande subséquente sera passée à la coentreprise et cet accord sera conclu en monnaie indienne.
 

Edited by Picdelamirand-oil
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 7 minutes, Picdelamirand-oil a dit :

Cela impliquerait que 18 avions soient achetés sur étagère auprès d'un fabricant d'équipement d'origine (OEM) étranger et que 36 soient construits en Inde par le biais d'une coentreprise dans le cadre du programme "Make In India".

Il rêvent humide là...

Néanmoins, il n'y a que le GIE Rafale qui pourrait s'engager à produire du Make In India dans ces conditions... S'ils acceptent...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 4 minutes, bubzy a dit :

Il rêvent humide là...

Néanmoins, il n'y a que le GIE Rafale qui pourrait s'engager à produire du Make In India dans ces conditions... S'ils acceptent...

Ils accepteront parce qu'ils savent bien que tous les programmes en cours indigènes prendront des siècles pour se concrétiser et que l'Inde n'aura d'autre possibilité sérieuse que de prolonger la production locale pour ne pas se retrouver à poil.

En plus ça permet d'avoir une deuxième chaîne d'assemblage pour le cas où l'Arabie Saoudite ou tout autre client nous commanderait 200 Rafale.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 5 minutes, Picdelamirand-oil a dit :

Ils accepteront parce qu'ils savent bien que tous les programmes en cours indigènes prendront des siècles pour se concrétiser et que l'Inde n'aura d'autre possibilité sérieuse que de prolonger la production locale pour ne pas se retrouver à poil.

En plus ça permet d'avoir une deuxième chaîne d'assemblage pour le cas où l'Arabie Saoudite ou tout autre client nous commanderait 200 Rafale.

Oui m'enfin... ils sont tellement long qu'ils seraient capable de nous faire investir des centaines de million en pure perte, car quand les prochaines commandes seront passées, le Rafale ne sera plus produit. 

Je rappelle à toute fin utile que le MMRCA a été initié en 2001

Que l'Alphajet avait été sélectionné - trop tard et qu'il ont pris des Hawk

Que le Mirage 2000 aussi aurait dû être commandé à des centaines d'exemplaires si on suit les rumeurs de l'époque, et que rien n'avait été fait. 

Le Make In India a été initié, on a mis un pieds dans la porte et c'est bien. Mais un pieds prudent. S'il faut mettre une chaîne d'assemblage final c'est bon pour la com. ça représente que 5% de la valeur de l'avion mais ça vent super bien. C'est comme un meuble Ikea que tu pense avoir construit tout seul, alors que t'as pas coupé un seul arbre, t'as pas découpé une seule planche, t'as pas été cherché le métal qui sert à faire les vis, t'as rien peint, t'as juste suivi un plan en montant trois vis et tu te congratule avec deux bières. 

C'est à la France de leur faire comprendre que plus leur engagement sera important, plus les retours industriels seront important. A l'inverse, ils auront des partenariats corrects, mais pas plus. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 29 minutes, Picdelamirand-oil a dit :

France’s Rafale jets are frontrunner in race for Indian Navy contract

 

Les avions à réaction français Rafale sont en tête de la course pour le contrat de la marine indienne.

L'avancée de la marine indienne signifie que la proposition d'acquérir davantage de jets Rafale pour l'IAF devrait également s'accélérer.

Le Rafale-M de l'avionneur français Dassault Aviation s'est imposé comme le favori pour décrocher un méga contrat de 27 chasseurs auprès de la marine indienne, a appris ThePrint, laissant derrière lui le F/A-18 Super Hornet de l'américain Boeing.

Selon des sources de l'establishment de la défense et de la sécurité, la marine a soumis un rapport détaillé au ministère de la défense sur les performances des Super Hornet et du Rafale-M, qui est la version marine de l'avion de combat déjà utilisé par l'Indian Air Force, au cours de deux séries de démonstrations.

La société américaine Boeing et le constructeur français Dassault Aviation ont effectué des démonstrations opérationnelles des Super Hornets et du Rafale-M respectivement, en présentant des sauts à ski - une capacité de décollage cruciale - depuis l'installation d'essai à terre de l'INS Hansa à Goa, afin de démontrer leur capacité à opérer à partir des porte-avions indiens.

Refusant d'entrer dans les détails, des sources ont déclaré que le rapport du quartier général de la marine au ministère de la défense ne mentionne que les "points positifs", et que le Rafale-M remplit tous les critères.

Le rapport au ministère de la défense a été envoyé après une analyse détaillée par le quartier général de la marine sur les performances des deux avions. Ceux qui ont entrepris les tests ont préparé un "rapport d'essai" qui a été envoyé au quartier général de la marine pour une analyse détaillée des performances et la sélection des avions.

À la question de savoir si la taille du porte-avions indien INS Vikrant serait un problème, les sources ont répondu que les deux avions devaient être soulevés et abaissés selon un certain angle.

Bien que les ailes des Super Hornets se replient - contrairement au Rafale - elles doivent toujours être soulevées et abaissées selon un certain angle. Les deux avions disposent également d'un processus distinct au cours duquel les ailes se replient.

La conception et l'espace de la taille de l'appareil ont posé problème car il est entendu qu'il a été conçu en tenant compte du MiG 29K et de la version navale de l'avion Tejas.

La marine exploite actuellement l'avion russe MiG 29K depuis l'INS Vikramaditya. Mais avec la mise en service de l'INS Vikrant, la force a cherché à obtenir davantage d'avions de combat.

Le nouveau contrat est censé être un arrangement provisoire car la marine mise sur son avion de combat indigène. Le chef de la marine, l'amiral Hari Kumar, a déclaré samedi que l'avenir de l'aéronavale indienne était le chasseur indigène Twin Engine Deck Based Fighter (TEDBF), dont le prototype est attendu pour 2026-27 et dont la production devrait commencer vers 2032.

Il a également déclaré que le chasseur naval existant, le MiG 29K, était en nombre limité et que les fournitures de rechange russes n'étaient "pas non plus très nombreuses".

Des chasseurs pour l'IAF

Des sources ont déclaré que la balle était maintenant dans le camp du ministère de la défense qui décidera de la suite des opérations. Elles ont ajouté que le contrat est susceptible d'être un accord de gouvernement à gouvernement tout comme la commande précédente pour les jets Rafale de l'IAF.

On apprend que les Français ont proposé de transférer certains avions de leur propre flotte navale afin que la marine indienne puisse les utiliser plus rapidement. Cependant, tous les chasseurs seront probablement achetés sur étagère.

Des sources ont expliqué que l'avancée de la marine indienne signifierait que la proposition d'acquérir davantage de jets Rafale pour l'IAF est également susceptible de s'accélérer. Cela s'explique par le fait qu'il serait plus prudent, d'un point de vue financier, de disposer d'un plus grand nombre d'avions, ce qui permettrait de réduire les coûts.

Comme l'a rapporté ThePrint précédemment, le gouvernement envisage de diviser le méga marché de 114 avions de combat multirôles (MRFA) pour l'IAF. Au lieu d'acquérir 114 chasseurs en une seule fois, comme cela était prévu auparavant, le gouvernement envisage de passer une commande initiale de 54 appareils pour l'IAF.

Cela impliquerait que 18 avions soient achetés sur étagère auprès d'un fabricant d'équipement d'origine (OEM) étranger et que 36 soient construits en Inde par le biais d'une coentreprise dans le cadre du programme "Make In India".

Il s'agit d'une commande qui sera passée directement auprès de l'équipementier étranger. Une commande subséquente sera passée à la coentreprise et cet accord sera conclu en monnaie indienne.
 

Merci.

Tu as le lien vers l'article ?

il y a 4 minutes, bubzy a dit :

Que le Mirage 2000 aussi aurait dû être commandé à des centaines d'exemplaires si on suit les rumeurs de l'époque, et que rien n'avait été fait. 

C'est justement cette occasion ratée qui fait que les indiens ne vont pas en rester à 36 Rafale dans l'IAF.   Les trop petites flottes, ils connaissent, et s'en mordent un peu les doigts.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,981
    Total Members
    1,749
    Most Online
    Personne
    Newest Member
    Personne
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.5k
    Total Topics
    1.7m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...