Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Guerre Russie-Ukraine 2022+ : Opérations militaires


Recommended Posts

il y a 6 minutes, Colstudent a dit :

Il reste quoi aux Russes que les Ukrainiens peuvent craindre à ce jour ? 

Avec du temps et si on laisse faire les mecs intelligents, que Poutine sélectionne correctement ses généraux leur fait confiance, organise rigoureusement la production des équipements d'infanterie et d'artillerie, que les soldats sont entraînés, tournent au front, même avec de lourdes pertes l'armée russe conventionnelle peut encore obtenir un résultat opérationnel et reste à mon avis la pire menace pour la capacité militaire Ukrainienne.

Le reste c'est crade mais pas décisif militairement.

Mais l'industrie militaire russe affronte celle de tout l'occident. Qui fournit généreusement les Ukrainiens. Pour l'instant on a vidé les stocks, et le redémarrage est lent, mais à priori si ça dure à terme les occidentaux ont de tels moyens qu'il faudra au russe se réinventer industriellement et doctrinalement. Ce qui a commencé d'ailleurs. "L'armée russe" est en voie de réorganisation (et de fragmentation au sens redistribution du travail). Un peu beaucoup par darwinisme, et c'est brutal, mais cela correspond mieux aux exigences du conflit que ce qui a été fait en mars, puis d'avril à juin, puis l'impasse de cet été.

  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Un article de Pavel Luzin dans the Insider sur, selon lui, l'échec prévisible de la  mobilisation https://theins.ru/en/opinion/pavel-luzin/255501

Où on apprend que les mobilisés sont contraints de signer des contrats , pour passer du statut de mobilisé à 'volontaire'.

Citation

All-out death throes. Five reasons why mobilization is doomed to failure

28 September 2022

Pavel Luzin

Читать на русском языке

The announcement of partial mobilization without openly documented numbers and timeline marked the Kremlin's transition to an escalation scenario - something we talked about back in late spring, and its likelihood has only increased since then as Russia has weakened on the battlefield. Interestingly, the 1997 law on mobilization training and mobilization, an atavism of the Soviet era, clearly states:

“The President <...> in cases of aggression against the Russian Federation or an imminent threat of aggression, the emergence of armed conflicts directed against the Russian Federation, shall declare general or partial mobilization with immediate notification thereof to the Federation Council and the State Duma.”

Of course, the aggression is carried out by the Russian Federation itself. This means that the mobilization is intended if not to implement the Kremlin's plan - in the form of the destruction of Ukraine as a state and Ukrainian culture (it’s not possible) - then at least to improve the foreign policy position of Russia in the current critical situation. Here, too, the Kremlin may attempt to squeeze acceptable cease-fire terms out of Kiev and its allies, followed by multilateral negotiations – while continuing the war, trying to save the defeated Russian troops, and even involving NATO countries in the war.

Continuation of the war, mobilization, and escalation are an attempt to squeeze acceptable ceasefire terms out of Kiev and its allies

Nevertheless, the mobilization raises a whole range of problems that inspire confidence in its failure and inability to seriously affect anything.

First, a “rubber mobilization” without deadlines or clear parameters inevitably undermines the credibility of the Russian authorities, even among those who pay lip service to the war. In other words, mobilization delegitimizes the Kremlin.

Second, in Russia, with its authoritarian rule, the republican type of mobilization that we see in Ukraine and that we have seen before in history, such as during the French Revolution or the American Civil War, is simply not possible. This type of mobilization is based on mutual trust between the authorities (at all levels) and civil society. In addition, it needs civil society itself, with its horizontal ties and consolidation, on which, among other things, the supply of a republican army relies.

In an authoritarian system, all this is impossible. Only forced mobilization is possible, as we saw with Lenin and Trotsky, with Stalin, Hitler, Mao, Ho Chi Minh, and Pol Pot. Moreover, to succeed, this type of mobilization needs a huge rural population, which constitutes a resource for mobilization waves. At the same time, such population must be sufficiently scattered across the country to prevent it from organizing resistance to the authorities as much as possible.

“Rubber mobilization” without deadlines and clear parameters inevitably undermines the credibility of the Russian authorities, even among those who pay lip service to the war

Russia has moved away from the agrarian society, so the impossibility of successful forced mass mobilization, and, moreover, its being unnecessary and even harmful for success in modern war became obvious to the Soviet command in the 1980s. A little later, during perestroika, the natural problem of the amorality of such mobilization, with its fundamentally inhumane and anticultural character, was discussed. Nevertheless, Russia proved unable to create the armed forces of a democratic republic or the republic itself.

As a result, it will have to carry out a forced mobilization in a reality unsuitable for mass coercion with impunity. Russian citizens, who had been holding on to the crumbling remnants of their former lives throughout the months of war and who were caught off guard by the mobilization, will increasingly resist. And above all, this resistance will grow within a developed culture of sabotage rather than open protest. And the growth of violence will inevitably begin to generate retaliatory violence: this vector was confirmed last weekend in Dagestan.

Resistance will primarily grow within the framework of a developed culture of sabotage

There is, however, one crucial, but somehow overlooked contradiction. The authorities force the mobilized citizens to sign a contract - which de jure means their “self-mobilization” - through psychological pressure, threats, and the use of legal illiteracy (at the same time, according to Article 421 of the Civil Code on freedom of contract, signing such a contract is an a priori voluntary matter). This is how the Kremlin is trying to leave itself a loophole: “Boy, we did not force you to go to this war, you signed the contract yourself.” This removes the question of the paragraph of the law on mobilization which conditions it on the existence of aggression or a threat of aggression against Russia. In addition, neither the already serving nor freshly “mobilized contract servicemen” in the conditions of even partial mobilization are able to terminate their contract. So what we end up with is not even a mobilization army in the style of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but a kind of “military servitude.”

In essence, by this step, the Kremlin is shifting its responsibility for the war onto the mobilized citizens. Apparently, it is trying to forestall the threat of politicization for the formerly apolitical Russians, since their noses can be always rubbed in the fact that they are contract servicemen. And what's more, it is trying to build a defensive line in advance in case of a future international tribunal: “Not only we, the specific leaders, are to blame, but the many thousands of Russian citizens who signed the contract for the murder of the Ukrainians - by and large, the entire Russian people.”

The Kremlin shifts its responsibility for the war onto the mobilized citizens

Third, the 2009-2012 military reforms in Russia disbanded the cadre units that were supposed to be deployed in the event of mobilization at the expense of mobilized citizens. Thus, the question arises: where to send the mobilized today? The only answer is: to those units that suffered losses in Ukraine and were withdrawn from the battlefield to be re-staffed. However, this means that not only privates have been lost, but also sergeants, warrant officers, and officers, i.e. precisely those who must command the mobilized. Accordingly, further growth of confusion and organizational chaos in the troops are inevitable.

Fourth, the current “partial mobilization” is focused on the mobilization of soldiers and does not imply the introduction of martial law. And it is already obvious that the Russian economy, and the authorities, are simply not ready for such a turnaround. Roughly speaking, a factory that used to work a standard eight-hour workday producing some kind of missiles cannot be switched to a 24/7 operation. There is neither enough equipment, nor enough employees, nor appropriate capabilities of suppliers and subcontractors for that. The same can be said about the authorities: it is impossible to send people to kill Ukrainians and try to fight their resistance and the growing imbalances from 8:00 to 17:00 with a lunch break five days a week. Thus, a transition to martial law and full mobilization is extremely likely - and these, according to the same law on mobilization training, will enable the mobilization of authorities and enterprises.

As a consequence, authoritarian forced mobilization inevitably leads to an attempt to reanimate the planned economy. It is clear, however, that only an idiot can believe in the success of such a model, and the command-administrative system itself will only exacerbate the ongoing self-destruction of the Kremlin and Russia as a whole.

Fifth, the choice of the Kremlin, which is becoming weaker and has lost a significant part of its army, in favor of escalation generally aggravates the isolation of Russia and finally sets it against the rest of the world. In this situation, mobilization only prolongs the agony of the regime and increases the moral and material price that the Russian people will have to pay at the end of this war. One might recall that Germany, for example, did not complete reparation payments for World War I until 2010, 92 years after its defeat.

Today, unlike on February 24, 2022 or even last spring, Russia's very statehood is in question. And even if the country survives this war and can be re-established in one form or another, we will still be paying the bills in the XXII century.

 

 

Edited by Valy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 2 heures, Scarabé a dit :

Et le mec à decouvert ils sont deux en postion couché idéal pour faire un bon tir.Il se prend deux rafales et repart tranquille. Nomalement le guss il y reste:mechantc: 

Les gars sont sans doute désorientés par la gre' -sans doute offensive, ce qui expliquerait du coup aussi leur relative intégrité physique- qu'ils viennent d'encaisser.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 3 heures, bubzy a dit :

Y'a que moi que ça choque de voir des mecs se faire dézinguer à la grenade ? Ils doivent pas être en bon état les pauvres...

Grenade offensive , autrement dit un gros pétard . a utilisé en combat urbain à l'intérieur de bâtiment.

mais en pleine air ...alors à part un manque de bol de se taper un bout d'enveloppe ou l ou le bouchon ...

par contre , il se peut que ça siffle un temps  ou niveau tympan ...

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Une série de podcasts de War on the Rocks avec Mike Kofman et Lawrence Freedman sur l'armée russe post soviétique depuis la  première guerre de Tchétchénie jusqu'à la guerre en Ukraine. D'autres épisodes à venir. Je recommande pour mieux comprendre l'armée russe et le contexte de cette guerre.

Les deux premiers épisodes:

https://warontherocks.com/2022/09/the-kremlin-in-command-part-i-the-chechen-wars-and-georgia/

https://warontherocks.libsyn.com/the-kremlin-in-command-part-ii-syria-and-the-first-assault-on-ukraine

Edited by Valy
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, bubzy said:

J'ai cherché j'ai pas trouvé. ça me parait tellement irréaliste que j'aimerai bien voir la vidéo. 

Elle ressort cette video de 7 secondes , aujourd'hui sur le compte de  "J.comme Jéjé" . C'est vrai que le gars est pénard fumant sa clope, tapant la discute avec ces nouveaux arrivants

Selon la traduction fournie  "He is smoking and saying smth “first time see troops here” our guys answer “we are as well, but we are banderovtsyi

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 12 minutes, Fusilier a dit :

Justement: ont-ils le temps...?  Convient de temps les mecs coincés rive droite, du côté de Kherson, peuvent tenir. 

Pour l'instant ça tient, et j'ai même vu passer pas mal de vidéos d'assauts ukrainiens repoussés avec des pertes sensibles. Je ne serais pas surpris d'apprendre qu'en dépit de la destruction des ponts, les russes arrivent à faire passer rive droite suffisamment de ravitaillement pour maintenir un dispositif défensif pérenne.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 18 minutes, Fusilier a dit :

Justement: ont-ils le temps...?  Convient de temps les mecs coincés rive droite, du côté de Kherson, peuvent tenir. 

Je pense que Gally a raison quand il nous dit de nous mettre dans les bottes des (élites) Russes. l'Ukraine atlantiste est pour eux une menace existentielle. Humiliées jusqu'à la moelle par la chute de l'URSS, l'obsession de rétablir l'empire, de lui redonner une force militaire digne de ce nom (une "asabiya" si on utilise la pensée de l'historien Ibn khaldun, une partie de la société spécialisée dans l'exercice de la violence, une partie des élites croient être cette asabiya, avec les peuples non russes qui en seraient les auxiliaires). Dans leur rationalité mettre en jeu l'existence même de leur pays  n'a rien d'excessif, ils savent que nous sommes nous des épiciers, que pourrions nous contre leur mystique de la mère patrie séculaire dont l'extension de l'empire n'a été arrêté que par nos interventions répétées et pas toujours bienveillante ?

Bien sûr que la Russie est en train de perdre la guerre là maintenant. Je serai Poutine je lâcherai l'affaire pour préparer les rounds suivants. Mais ces gens là veulent écrire l'histoire, pas faire des comptes d'épicerie. Ils feront tuer du monde si il faut, ils pensent Empire, respirent Empire, et ont peut-être aussi du mal à voir que leur propre société n'est pas entièrement engagée dans ce trip là.

Édit : Cherson c'est littéralement une guerre de siège. On verra pas de changement avant encore 1 ou 2 mois.

Edited by Berezech
  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Un florilège de vidéos filmées par des conscrits russes selon Meduza, ou la misère de la conscription russe du moment :

NB : pour ceux qui ne savent pas : un 'tourniquet' est un garrot. On demande aux conscrits de venir avec leurs propres garrots!

 

Edited by Valy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 10 minutes, Berezech a dit :

Je pense que Gally a raison quand il nous dit de nous mettre dans les bottes des (élites) Russes. l'Ukraine atlantiste est pour eux une menace existentielle. Humiliées jusqu'à la moelle par la chute de l'URSS, l'obsession de rétablir l'empire, de lui redonner une force militaire digne de ce nom (une "asabiya" si on utilise la pensée de l'historien Ibn khaldun, une partie de la société spécialisée dans l'exercice de la violence, une partie des élites croient être cette asabiya, avec les peuples non russes qui en seraient les auxiliaires). Dans leur rationalité mettre en jeu l'existence même de leur pays  n'a rien d'excessif, ils savent que nous sommes nous des épiciers, que pourrions nous contre leur mystique de la mère patrie séculaire dont l'extension de l'empire n'a été arrêté que par nos interventions répétées et pas toujours bienveillante ?

Bien sûr que la Russie est en train de perdre la guerre là maintenant. Je serai Poutine je lâcherai l'affaire pour préparer les rounds suivants. Mais ces gens là veulent écrire l'histoire, pas faire des comptes d'épicerie. Ils feront tuer du monde si il faut, ils pensent Empire, respirent Empire, et ont peut-être aussi du mal à voir que leur propre société n'est pas entièrement engagée dans ce trip là.

Édit : Cherson c'est littéralement une guerre de siège. On verra pas de changement avant encore 1 ou 2 mois.

Je pense pour ma part que le Japon de 1945 avait une vénération de l'ordre militaire ,et une cohésion sociale (notamment autour de l'empereur) bien supérieure à la russie de Poutine autour de son projet impérial. La défaite militaire japonaise (et quelques décennies de patronnage bienveillant américain)  leur a quand même fait drastiquement virer leur cutie pour un modèle démocratique et assez pacifiste. C'est donc peut-être aux dernières lueurs du panslavisme auxquelles nous sommes en train d'assister, si jamais 'escalade de Poutine conduit à une défaite militaire russe. Car je suis bien d'accord que la société russe n'est pas entièrement engagée dans ce trip. 300000 personnes viennet de voter avec leur pieds pour dire le contraire. Cela ouvre néanmoins la boite de Pandore, la fédération de russie pourrait ne pas y resister. La disparition d'un empire peut engendrer bien des soubressauts.... Mais nous n'y sommes pas encore. Simplement Poutine s'est mis en situation de tout mettre sur le tapis et de jouer à quitte ou double.

  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 15 minutes, Amnésia a dit :

Réveil naturel

 

Juste pour remettre une pièce sur l'AK russe toute rouillée...;)

Faite pause et regardez l'état de cette AK 74 UK particulièrement le tube d emprunt des gaz et le canon... c est pas bcp mieux 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 3 heures, FATac a dit :

Ben... ils partent sur leurs deux jambes, et chargés comme ils sont, ils paraissent bien mobiles.

Je dirais qu'à part une surdité probable et peut-être quelques traumas légers, ils ont probablement eu une chance assez inouie (possiblement couchés sous le cône de dispersion des éclats si c'est une grenade défensive - bien résistants à la surpression de l'explosion proche si c'est une grenade offensive).

Un pilote une fois m'a montré une vidéo de bgl 250kg balancée d'un diesel sur des afghans. J'ai été étonné de les voir tous détaller comme des lapins après. 

Il m'a expliqué que la vidéo est coupé mais qu'ils font pas 50m. Le blast a liquéfié une parti de leurs organes internes, ils sont déjà morts sans le savoir, c'est l'adrénaline qui les maintien tres temporairement en vie. 

Bon là c'est qu'une grenade, et ils sont repartis aussi. Doivent quand même pas être très frais. 

il y a une heure, Tetsuo a dit :

Grenade offensive , autrement dit un gros pétard . a utilisé en combat urbain à l'intérieur de bâtiment.

mais en pleine air ...alors à part un manque de bol de se taper un bout d'enveloppe ou l ou le bouchon ...

par contre , il se peut que ça siffle un temps  ou niveau tympan ...

Ça sert juste à sonner ?

  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 25 minutes, 2020 a dit :

Juste pour remettre une pièce sur l'AK russe toute rouillée...;)

Faite pause et regardez l'état de cette AK 74 UK particulièrement le tube d emprunt des gaz et le canon... c est pas bcp mieux 

La plupart des 74 commencent à dater quand tu vois l'état des famas f1 qu'on utilise encore dans certaines unités le rinçage ne m'étonne pas de base mais une couche de rouille intérieur, extérieur dans des armes concervées en arsenal ( normalement graissées et bunkerisées ... et puis à comparer à des armes avec des mois de guerre dans les pattes c'est comparer ce qui n'est pas comparable.

 

 

En parlant de fusil d'assaut 

 

 

 

Je constate de plus en plus d'ukrainiens avec des M4 ou M4A1 et ceux des images ne sont pas leurs copies locales mais bien les modèles standards américains ( après je ne sais pas si ce sont les derniers modèles de M4A1 aux normed PIP ou du M4 plus basique c'est dure à dire de l'extérieur.)

 

Edited by Connorfra
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 19 minutes, bubzy a dit :

Ça sert juste à sonner ?

Non, mais imagine un énorme pétard que tu balances dans une pièce fermée que tu comptes prendre d'assaut. 

Une grenade défensive (une frag) aurait une chance sur deux de ne rien faire parce que l'ennemi serait planqué derrière un abri préparé. Alors qu'une grenade offensive va lui vriller les tympans, l'aveugler, le désorienter complètement et te permettre de forcer l'entrée sans qu'il t'accueille avec une rafale en pleine poire.

  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 24 minutes, bubzy a dit :

Ça sert juste à sonner ?

La même grenade dans une pièce , un blocos ou par exemple dans un char fera bien plus mal .

Oui ça va sonner très fort . Et plus c est confiné, plus ça fait mal . Pour les dégâts ..suis pas médecin.

 

Edited by Tetsuo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,805
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    FLOMED
    Newest Member
    FLOMED
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.4k
    Total Topics
    1.6m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...