desertfox

Marine américaine dans le futur.

Recommended Posts

Sans compter Guam... Je pense que l'on à déjà signaler qu'alors que 15 % des SNLE US était dans le Pacifique dans les années 1980, c'est désormais 60 % qui sont dans un océan qui risque ne pas rester pacifique  :rolleyes:

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

m'en commanderait bien un moi... :lol:

construction aux frais des US bien sûr, pour faire marcher leur économie...  :lol:

utilisation aux frais* des brillants ingénieurs en mathématique (mais c'est pas les seuls) qui se sont brulés les ailes en voulant faire mumuse avec l'économie mondiale...  :lol:

*par contre pas question qu'ils montent à bord... pas envie d'avoir un accident nucléaire... :lol:

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Cà veut surtout dire qu'ils doivent commencer à trouver des solutions aux défis techniques posés par les CVN 21

Catapultes electromagnétiques, nouveaux réacteurs, nouvelles électronique mise en oeuvre de drones, F 35...

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

http://www.defpro.com/news/details/5154/

Lexington Institute: DDG-1000 Destroyer Is Not Needed 

16:16 GMT, January 27, 2009

The U.S. Navy has a favorite mantra that concisely captures why maritime strategy matters: 70% of the world is covered by water, 80% of its people live close to the sea, and 90% of its trade travels by sea. Those facts by themselves explain why having a forward-deployed naval fleet is necessary.

But being there isn't enough. The Navy must have the right capabilities to influence events both at sea and ashore. The service has done a good job of thinking through how its aircraft carriers and submarines can contribute to near-shore, or "littoral" operations. And it doesn't take much imagination to see why the Marine Corps requirement for 33 modern amphibious-assault vessels is relevant to the fight ashore. But when it comes to surface combatants, the Navy has made some missteps.

Surface combatants come in three basic flavors -- frigates, destroyers and cruisers -- with the smaller frigates optimized for shallow-water operations and other, larger combatants operating further out to sea. The Navy's opening gambit for becoming more relevant ashore after the collapse of communism was a huge destroyer initially called DD-21, then DD(X), and now DDG-1000. In naval nomenclature, "DD" means destroyer and "G" means it carries guided missiles.

DDG-1000 was supposed to meet the Marine Corps need for high rates of fire ashore by carrying guns that could shoot precision rounds a hundred kilometers or more. However, the high cost of the warship -- well over $3 billion each -- made it too pricey to buy in quantity, and too valuable to deploy near enemy shores. The concept of operations was thus inherently flawed, because the guns can't hit much unless the warship is close to enemy territory.

Navy leaders began to have doubts about DDG-1000 two years ago. By that time they had made progress on a replacement for their cold-war frigates dubbed the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) that looked like a much better match for future military needs. The modular design of the LCS enabled it to perform a wide range of missions without becoming a multi-billion-dollar behemoth.

Meanwhile, threats had changed faster than expected in the Western Pacific and elsewhere, with China deploying very quiet diesel-electric submarines, sea-skimming anti-ship missiles, and ballistic missiles that might soon have the ability to hit U.S. carriers. So the Navy decided to pull the plug on the DDG-1000.

Last summer, the Navy told Congress it wanted to halt DDG-1000 production at three ships and instead build an improved version of its Aegis destroyers along with LCS. The reason why, it said, was that the firepower provided by DDG-1000 could be replaced using other weapons, but it desperately needed to enhance its anti-missile and anti-submarine warfare capabilities.

Aegis destroyers and cruisers are receiving upgrades to their combat systems, already considered the best in the world for intercepting hostile aircraft and missiles at sea. When combined with the anti-ship, anti-mine and anti-submarine capabilities of the LCS, these upgrades will assure fleet survivability for decades to come.

The Obama Administration should listen to what the Navy is saying. The sea services can harvest many of the technological advances developed for the DDG-1000 by redirecting contractors to work on other projects. Prime contractor Raytheon appears to have done a very good job on the ship's electronic combat system. But the ship itself isn't needed, and it doesn't make sense to reconfigure the vessel for missile defense when only three are likely to be built.

The Navy needs to focus scarce funding on the vessels that will provide the backbone of the surface fleet -- Aegis destroyers, Aegis cruisers, and Littoral Combat Ships -- while assuring a sufficient level of ship construction so that no adverse economic consequences are felt at the yards where surface combatants are built.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

toujours ce bon vieux principe, si c'est c'est cher, on en a peu et donc c'est précieux et si c'est précieux, on ne l'expose pas... Donc pas de soutien côtier au tir canon.

En même temps, 3Md le bâtiment c'était un peu du foutage de gueule.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

toujours ce bon vieux principe, si c'est c'est cher, on en a peu et donc c'est précieux et si c'est précieux, on ne l'expose pas... Donc pas de soutien côtier au tir canon.

En même temps, 3Md le bâtiment c'était un peu du foutage de gueule.

Benh, disons que ça fait le prix du projet de PA2 français pour chaque DDG1000 ;)

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

en même temps, un destroyer AEGIS (dont le cout de développement est amorti depuis longtemps à mon avis...) coute plus d'un milliard de $, il me semble.

Là, c'est des navires innovants, nécessitant beaucoup de recherche et développement (nouveaux canons, nouvelle coque, nouveaux lanceurs périphériques, nouveaux systèmes électroniques, forte automatisation (c'est une première pour l'US Navy à mon avis...), etc.).

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Gene Taylor sets out Navy shipbuilding plan :

Rep. Gene Taylor (D-MS), Chairman of the Seapower and Expeditionary Forces Subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee released the following statement on the future of Navy shipbuilding.

"For far too many years I have watched as the size of the Navy fleet has decreased. Each year the Navy changes its plan on how many ships will be built and delays the procurement of ships to future years. The Bush administration's failed strategy of trying to build 'transformational' ships, such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) and the DDG 1000 destroyer, has crippled the Navy shipbuilding budget and forced years of delays in providing needed capability to the Fleet.

"In particular, the failure of the LCS program to deliver on the promise of an affordable, capable, and reconfigurable warship only puts the exclamation point on a Bush administration's strategy that was neither well envisioned nor properly executed. As for the DDG 1000, we will not know the true cost of that program for a number of years but significant cost growth on that vessel will require diverting funding from other new construction projects to pay the over-run.

"Lacking the expectation of increased funding available for ship procurement, it is more important than ever to set the Navy on an affordable strategy for ship procurement. Continuing resistance from outgoing Bush administration officials to the common sense strategy of restarting the DDG 51 destroyer class is not helpful to the Navy and the nation. The shipbuilding plan needs less meddling, not more. In my opinion there is absolutely no value in spending even more precious shipbuilding funds to re-design the DDG 1000 as a ballistic missile capable platform when the affordable vessel already exists in the DDG 51 destroyer.

"I hope that the new officials within the Obama administration will reach out to the Congress for ideas and suggestions on shipbuilding programs before creating even more imbalance and uncertainty in the shipbuilding master plan. To achieve an affordable, stable shipbuilding plan I recommend the following to the new administration:

- Restructure the LCS program with common combat and propulsion systems between the two variants of ships. Divorce from the use of the defense firms as Lead Systems Integrators and bid a fixed price contract directly on a "build to print" basis with any shipyard that possesses the industrial capability to build the vessels.

- Truncate the DDG 1000 program. The ship is unaffordable.

- Restart the DDG 51 program. Not only is it the finest destroyer in the world but it possesses the capability for strategic missile defense, area air defense, and highly capable anti-submarine defense. Build these ships in quantity. If it improves efficiency to computerize the ship's design into a 3-D modern ship design tool, then Navy should request that non-recurring engineering funding.

- Build combatant amphibious assault vessels, vice the non-combatant versions of the proposed Maritime Pre-Positioning Force (Future) or MPF(F). Use the basic LPD or LHD hull form for any other future large ship, including the next generation cruiser, instead of designing a new hull.

- Build a frigate on the common hull of the Coast Guard National Security Cutter. This is an affordable ship (without Navy making wholesale changes in the design) which is exactly the type of vessel necessary for 80% of the Navy's core missions, including anti-piracy and homeland defense.

"I look forward to working with the administration and the Department of the Navy in discussing these issues and implementing the ones that provide the best capability for the Navy. In my opinion, the worst thing that the Department can do is continue the policy of the previous administration and not seek any guidance from the Congress prior to submitting shipbuilding plans that were unacceptable in cost and quantity."

Si Obama suite ces recommandations, on va avoir pas mal de suicide dans les bureaux d'études des programmes de la marine ! 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Invité

il me semble que Gene Taylor souhaite présenter au congrès des projets qui n'ont pas dépassé de + 25 % leurs coûts. tel que le programme DDG 1000.

pour cela le pentagone prépare

  • un projet de navire appelé FSC qui soit reprendra la carène du DDG1000 soit reprendra la carène du DDG 51

  • développe un navire ayant une carène commune aux Coast Guard National Security Cutter

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

je rappelle qu'il y a quand même 20 à 25 groupes aéronavals ou amphibies à protéger. Avec 2 à 3 DDG par groupe, ça grimpe vite...

Surtout que là ils ne parlent pas du remplacement des CG-47 par les CG-X, donc peut-être qu'ils envisagent aussi de les remplacer par des DDG-51 (ce qui pour moi n'est pas plus mal, les DDG-51 étant loin d'être des merdes...).

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

pour cela, va valoir changer de coque...

déjà que par manque de place (entre autres), les DDG-79 (batch IIA des DDG-51) n'emportent pas de Harpoon...

Même les CG-47 Tico n'ont pas plus de 126 cellules VLS et "seulement" 2 127 mm...

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

En mars 2008, un parlementaire américain considérait que le programme de nouveaux porte-avions (classe Ford) était très risqué. Une des principales nouvelles technologies dont il doit être équipé, le système de lancement électro-magnétique ou EMALS était encore en développement alors même que la construction du Ford avait déjà commencé.

Un an plus tard, le chantier Newport News, qui était chargé du développement, vient d’annoncer que l’EMALS est un échec. Actuellement, personne ne sait quoi faire. Modifier les plans du Ford pour remplacer l’EMALS par une catapulte à vapeur ? Investir encore plus d’argent dans EMALS pour le faire fonctionner ?

Pour la nouvelle administration Obama, il sera très simple d’abandonner la construction d’une nouvelle classe de porte-avions alors que son principal composant ne fonctionne pas.

http://www.corlobe.tk/article12786.html

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

En mars 2008, un parlementaire américain considérait que le programme de nouveaux porte-avions (classe Ford) était très risqué. Une des principales nouvelles technologies dont il doit être équipé, le système de lancement électro-magnétique ou EMALS était encore en développement alors même que la construction du Ford avait déjà commencé.

Un an plus tard, le chantier Newport News, qui était chargé du développement, vient d’annoncer que l’EMALS est un échec. Actuellement, personne ne sait quoi faire. Modifier les plans du Ford pour remplacer l’EMALS par une catapulte à vapeur ? Investir encore plus d’argent dans EMALS pour le faire fonctionner ?

Pour la nouvelle administration Obama, il sera très simple d’abandonner la construction d’une nouvelle classe de porte-avions alors que son principal composant ne fonctionne pas.

http://www.corlobe.tk/article12786.html

Le plus simple serait de reprendre les plans du dernier des PA de la classe "Nimitz" (le CVN "Georges Washington" qui sera livré à l'US Navy en avril) et d'en construire d'autres équipé de nouveaux senseurs, nouveaux systèmes de télécom, nouveau CMS, tout en gardant les bonnes vielles catapulyes à vapeur dont le bon fonctionnement est garanti.

Au moins il serait sûr de disposer rapidement (= d'ici 5 ans) de 2 nouveaux PA de 100 000 tonnes pleinement opérationnels ; cela n'empêcherait pas de poursuivre les recherches sur L'EMALS pour lancer la nouvelle classe "G.Ford" plus tard, vers 2018-2020 ...

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

http://www.defensetech.org/archives/004836.html

It's a downsized Navy that, save for pirate sniping, is having a hard time grabbing the limelight in a ground-intensive war (sorry, contingency operation) against Islamic extremists.

So, you've just got to be ready for the knife when the bean counters try to find money for jeeps and cannons and wonder why you're spending $2 billion on subs, right?

Well, when the budget finally shook out for 2010, the Navy didn't stand in terrible shape. A few airplanes cut here, a ship or two there, but in the end, the sea service's top line increased by about $10 billion over 2009 to more than $156 billion, with another kicker of $15.3 billion for "overseas contingency operations" as the new GWOT is called (and most of that money is for Marine Corps vehicles, ammo and personnel).

Navy procurement jumped $5.7 billion to $44.8 billion, while research and development funding slumped $400 after the VH-71 presidential helo was axed.

Winners: DDG-51 with a one ship build in 2010 that restarts the line; one SSN-774 and some advanced money kicked in to build 12 Virginia class subs; two TAKE transport ships and another Joint High Speed Vessel; two more STOVL JSFs for a total of 16 funded in '10; one more C-40A (the admirals will love that); and six P-8A multi-mission aircraft beginning the Lot 1 LRIP buy and 325 new Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System missles designed to compliment the Hellfire rotor wing missiles.

Losers: DDG1000 one ship killed; LPD-17 no ships in 2010; one Maritime Prepositioning Force (Aviation) ship cancelled for a zero buy in 2010; and one MPF Mobile Landing Platform ship deep sixed for a zero buy; cut in half the number of Super Hornets from 18 to nine purchased in 2010, three MH-60Rs cut to 24, one E-2D cut for two; two KC-130Js cut for a zero buy and four T-6A trainers cut for a 38 aircraft buy and one MQ-8B drone cut for a five Fire Scout buy to match LCS needs.

The Navy is devoting $495 million to a ballistic missile sub replacement program for the 2030 timeframe -- the money will be used for propulsion and missile compartment research, LCS gets $361 million, $572 million for the CH-53K and $1.7 billion in R&D funds for the JSF program.

The Corps is finally going to get more of its Growler Internally Transportable Vehicles with 48 purchased in 2010 and 52 new Humvees. The Corps gets the lion's share of OCO funding, buying 18 LW155s, 933 Humvees and -- drumroll please -- ZERO MRAPs.

Navy officials said a lot of this will of course be dependent on Congresses concerns and also the mulling over the next Quadrennial Defense Review.

We'll have a lot more detail in the coming days as we analyze deep into the numbers, but that's a quick wrap up of what's going to the Blue-Green team.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Vers le retour au nucléaire pour les futurs croiseurs CGX ?

http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=4226195&c=AME&s=TOP

A U.S. Navy draft study has concluded that operating a nuclear-powered cruiser could be cheaper than operating a non-nuclear ship, but the Government Accountability Office (GAO) is disputing that assessment.

The U.S. Navy is mulling a new cruiser propelled by nuclear power, as was the USS South Carolina. (U.S. Navy / PH1 Gregory Pinkley) In an Aug. 7 letter sent to Sens. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass., and Mel Martinez, R-Fla., GAO analyst Paul Francis said a yet-to-be-approved Navy draft cost analysis showed that nuclear cruisers would be cheaper if oil-price patterns of the past 35 years continue to hold.

But Francis wrote that the Navy didn't include several factors in its calculations -factors that would change the results to show that non-nuclear ships would be cheaper.

They include "present value analysis," a way to calculate the future value of money; alternative scenarios for the future price of oil; and an examination of how a less efficient conventional propulsion system would affect cost estimates.

By including those factors in its calculations and coming up with a different result, Francis wrote, his analysis "demonstrates the sensitivity of the cost estimates to different assumptions, underscoring the need for more rigorous analysis before reaching conclusions."

Francis wrote that although the Navy disagreed with several of GAO's underlying analyses, it agreed with the need to include the new factors in its calculations.

The Navy is considering nuclear power for the new CGX cruiser, which it could buy in 2017. Congress has directed that the ships be nuclear-propelled, but a 2007 Navy analysis reported a nuclear cruiser would cost $600 million to $800 million more than a non-nuke.

The Navy has not commissioned a nuclear-powered warship other than an aircraft carrier or submarine since 1980, and all its nuclear cruisers were taken out of service in the 1990s.

The GAO letter also provided rare confirmation of some of the broad details of the never-released Analysis of Alternatives (AoA) report for the CGX cruiser. The report, begun in 2005, was to have been completed in late 2007, but has been withheld for a variety of reasons as the Navy reviewed its plans for the ship.

Francis reports that the Navy identified six ship design concepts in the CGX AoA: two based on modified DDG 1000 Zumwalt-class destroyers; one on a modified DDG 51 Arleigh Burke-class destroyer; one new conventionally powered cruiser; and one nuclear-powered cruiser. The sixth concept wasn't identified in the letter.

The designs vary in capability, Francis wrote, including the sensitivity of the primary radar, the number of missile cells, and the propulsion system.

The power of the new radar, to be developed from a new Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR), is a key factor in the new ship's ability to meet its mission requirements. Final power needs for the new radar, which is in the earliest stages of development, are as yet unknown, but numerous Navy sources report that the power needs will best be met by providing the cruiser with a nuclear power plant.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

vu sur Assaut.fr :

Le programme Advanced SEAL Delivery System (ASDS), sous-marin de poche, conçu au profit des nageurs de combat américains, est définitivement enterré. On se souvient que son développement avait subi un coup d’arrêt en avril 2006 puis que le seul submersible opérationnel, l’ASDS-1, avait été victime d’un incendie le 9 novembre dernier. Dans un premier temps, le Naval Special Warfare Command avait soigneusement évité de communiquer sur l’ampleur de dégâts. C’est désormais chose faite : réparer l’engin tête de série coûterait 237 millions de dollars et presque trois ans de travaux ; or, les crédits affectés à l’ensemble du programme sont de seulement 57 millions de dollars. L’United States Special Operations Command a donc sagement décidé de jeter l’éponge. Reste que le besoin subsiste et que le Shallow Water Combat Submersible d’ores et déjà présenté dans le cadre de cette chronique n’est qu’un engin “humide” emportant six hommes alors que l’ASDS était un submersible étanche gardant 16 nageurs de combat au sec.

D’où le lancement du programme Joint Multi-Mission Submersible (JMMS) sur lequel les détails sont encore rares. On sait seulement que le nouvel engin profitera des technologies mises au point dans le cadre du développement de l’ASDS, qu’il sera lui-aussi un submersible “sec” et que les crédits indispensables à son développement pourraient être prélevés non seulement sur le budget de la Défense mais aussi sur celui de la communauté du renseignement. Dans l’immédiat, une demande a été faite qui se monte à 43,4 millions de dollars dans le cadre du budget sur l’année fiscale 2010.

A plus long terme, d’autres projets nettement plus futuristes sont dans les cartons, projets qui pourraient en particulier donner naissance au Super-fast Submerged Transport (SST, engin de transport en submersion super-rapide) également dénommé Underwater Express. La particularité de cet engin est de mettre à profit le phénomène de super-cavitation qui consiste à entourer le sous-marin d’un matelas de bulles, dispositif permettant de réduire la résistance à l’avancement opposée par l’élément liquide ; c’est la technologie mise en œuvre par la torpille (officiellement le missile sous-marin) russe Shkval. Ce phénomène bien connu permettrait au SST d’atteindre des vitesses subaquatiques de 100 nœuds (environ 185 km/h) au prix il est vrai de deux inconvénients majeurs : un manque de discrétion phénoménal d’une part et une faible maniabilité d’autre part. Lancé en 2005, le programme SST a fait l’objet de l’attribution à General Dynamics Electric Boat d’un contrat de 38 millions de dollars qui devrait aboutir à l’évaluation dans le courant du printemps 2010 d’une maquette inhabitée à l’échelle 1/4 capable de maintenir la vitesse de 100 nœuds pendant 10 minutes en submersion. Mais insistons sur le fait qu’il ne s’agit là que d’une expérimentation technologique car au vu de son manque de discrétion, de nombreux experts s’interrogent d’ores et déjà sur l’utilité d’un SST opérationnel. Une des solutions à son emploi pourrait être de couvrir le bruit qu’il fait au moyen d’un bâtiment rapide (hovercraft) d’accompagnement s’écartant dès que le danger devient trop grand.

Parallèlement, la Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency a lancé en octobre dernier le programme de développement du Submersible Aircraft (avion submersible), un engin ayant une autonomie suffisante pour le profil de mission suivant : insertion (huit personnes plus 906 kg de charge utile) sur 1 852 kilomètres de trajet aérien, sur 185 kilomètres en surface puis sur 22 kilomètres en plongée suivie d’une extraction sur 22 kilomètres en plongée et sur 185 kilomètres en surface, le tout en trois jours de mission tandis que l’insertion seule doit être réalisée en huit heures maximum. La DARPA prend bien soin de préciser que la capacité à plonger n’est requise que dans la mesure où elle assure à l’engin le degré de furtivité jugé indispensable ; il s’agit donc bel et bien d’un “avion submersible” et non d’un “sous-marin volant”. Cette notion est importante dans le sens où le Submersible Aircraft n’étant pas destiné à plonger très profond, ses structures n’auront pas besoin d’être résistantes donc lourdes afin d’encaisser de fortes pressions.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

ça me fait penser à une version de l'Ekranoplan russe (http://fr.video.search.yahoo.com/video/play?p=ekranoplan&n=21&ei=utf-8&js=1&fr=yfp-t-501&fr2=tab-web&tnr=20&vid=0001534768554) mais en plus petit, plus discret (moins bruyant j'espère !), plus furtif.  

à moins que la Navy veut remettre au gout du jour les hydravions ?  Un retour du PBY Catalina (http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/PBY_Catalina) ne serait pas idiot si on arrive à en faire une version furtive pour dépose de commandos.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Invité

Les boules...

Des petits français ont mis au point un drone avion/sous-marin. Par manque d'intérêt ou tout simplement de fond, le projet est mis en stand-by

projet russe

...

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPBImage IPB

еобитаемый подводный аппарат (НПА) предназначен для патрулирования локальных подводных районов и  первичного обследования  обнаруженных объектов.

          НПА имеет хорошо обтекаемый веретенообразный корпус с двумя движителями в виде винтов с возможностью управления циклическим и общим шагом. Один из  которых представляет из себя маршевый винт, ось которого расположена вдоль строительной горизонтали  НПА.  Второй движитель действует только при снижении скорости движения до очень малых скоростей или при полном отсутствии горизонтальной скорости НПА и представляет собой винт, ось вращения которого расположена перпендикулярно строительной горизонтали НПА. При движении с крейсерской скоростью этот винт неподвижен и представляет собой х-образную систему горизонтальных управляемых рулей.

Аппарат с одной стороны требует минимальных энергетических затрат для движения в крейсерских режимах, и с другой стороны остается высоко маневренным средством на малых скоростях движения в случае необходимости первичного обследования обнаруженных объектов. Конструкция корпуса позволяет размещение как исследовательского оборудования так и боевой части.

НПА управляется следующим образом. При движении с крейсерской скоростью винт с вертикальной осью вращения неподвижен и представляет собой х-образную систему горизонтальных управляемых рулей.  При этом на горизонтальных рулях генерируются силы компенсирующие реактивный момент от маршевого движителя и позволяющие управлять НПА. На режимах малого хода и отсутствия хода реактивный момент от вращающегося винта с вертикальной осью компенсируется маршевым винтом управляемым в режиме циклического шага, а необходимые для управления по крену и тангажу силы генерируются винтом с вертикальной осью, управляемым изменением циклического шага его лопастей. Изменение глубины при таких скоростях движения осуществляется изменением общего шага винта с вертикальной осью вращения.

В зависимости от класса задач такие НПА могут иметь различное водоизмещение, а также геометрические характеристики корпуса и движителей. Подбирая соответствующую геометрию корпуса и лопастей винтов, можно получить низкий уровень шума НПА, что позволит использовать его в качестве разведывательного комплекса или высокоманевренного снаряда.

un traduction approximative

eobitaemy sous l'appareil (PPA) est conçu pour patrouiller les zones locales, et sous enquête primaire objets détectés.

           CAE a un corps fusiforme et rationalisée avec les deux conducteurs en forme de vis avec la capacité de gérer et de commune mesure cyclique. Dont une marche à vis, qui est l'axe horizontal le long de la construction CAE. Le deuxième moteur est seulement à basse vitesse et très basse vitesse ou en l'absence de vitesse horizontale et de la CAE est une vis, l'axe de rotation qui est perpendiculaire à l'horizontale de construction CAE. Quand vous conduisez à une vitesse de croisière de cette vis est immobile et x-forme du système de contrôle horizontal gouvernails.

Personnel, d'une part, exige un minimum le coût de l'énergie pour la circulation des navires de croisière et, d'autre part demeure un véhicule très maniable à basse vitesse, si nécessaire, un premier examen des objets détectés. La construction de la coque permet le placement d'équipements de recherche et d'ogives.

PPA est administré comme suit. Quand vous conduisez à une vitesse de croisière de la vis avec l'axe vertical de rotation, immobile, et représente la forme de x-système de contrôle horizontal gouvernails. À l'horizontale rulyah compensation de puissance réactive produite par le temps mars du moteur et de faire de la PPA. Mode de la petite et l'absence de progrès au cours du temps de réaction sur l'hélice en rotation d'un axe vertical offset croisière hélice contrôlée dans un cycle aller, mais nécessaire pour l'administration de roulis et de tangage sont des forces générées par une hélice avec un axe vertical, le contrôle des changements cycliques dans ses lames. Les changements en profondeur à de telles vitesses s'effectue pas de changer l'ensemble de vis à axe vertical de rotation.

En fonction de la classe de problèmes tels PPA mai ont un autre déplacement, ainsi que la géométrie de la coque et le moteur. Sélection de la géométrie de la coque et les pales des hélices, il est possible d'obtenir un faible bruit PPA, qui l'utilisera comme une intelligence complexe et très maniable projectiles.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

La traduction qui tue.

en gros c'est quoi ce truc russe, une torpille volante ? un drone ? ça transporte quelqu'un ou c'est automatisé ?

On est en pleine science fiction.

Il semble que ce soit un drone sous marin fonctionnant comme un helico en l'air et comme un sous marin sous l'eau. La voilure principale devient fixe en croix de saint André et sert de barre de plongée. Le propulseur fonctionnant comme un rotor d'helico permet de pousser ou de tirer plus ou moins d'un coté ou de l'autre de l'helice servant de gouvernaille sous l'eau et de rotor anticouple en l'air.

La figure 2 c'est en vol, la figure 3 c'est sous l'eau.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Créer un compte ou se connecter pour commenter

Vous devez être membre afin de pouvoir déposer un commentaire

Créer un compte

Créez un compte sur notre communauté. C’est facile !

Créer un nouveau compte

Se connecter

Vous avez déjà un compte ? Connectez-vous ici.

Connectez-vous maintenant

  • Statistiques des membres

    5 289
    Total des membres
    1 132
    Maximum en ligne
    Georgette
    Membre le plus récent
    Georgette
    Inscription
  • Statistiques des forums

    20 438
    Total des sujets
    1 176 553
    Total des messages
  • Statistiques des blogs

    3
    Total des blogs
    2
    Total des billets