Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Le F-35


georgio
 Share

Recommended Posts

Ouverture d'un nouveau front contre le f-35 depuis la Chine. Celle-ci envisage de contrôler l'exportation des terres rares nécessaires à la fabrication du f-35. Article du financial times

"

https://www.ft.com/content/d3ed83f4-19bc-4d16-b510-415749c032c1

China is exploring limiting the export of rare earth minerals that are crucial for the manufacture of American F-35 fighter jets and other sophisticated weaponry, according to people involved in a government consultation. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology last month proposed draft controls on the production and export of 17 rare earth minerals in China, which controls about 80 per cent of global supply. Industry executives said government officials had asked them how badly companies in the US and Europe, including defence contractors, would be affected if China restricted rare earth exports during a bilateral dispute. “The government wants to know if the US may have trouble making F-35 fighter jets if China imposes an export ban,” said a Chinese government adviser who asked not to be identified. Industry executives added that Beijing wanted to better understand how quickly the US could secure alternative sources of rare earths and increase its own production capacity. China’s own rare earth security isn’t guaranteed. It can disappear when the US-China relationship deteriorates or Myanmar’s generals decide to shut the border David Zhang, Sublime China Information Fighter jets such as the F-35, a Lockheed Martin aircraft, rely heavily on rare earths for critical components such as electrical power systems and magnets. A Congressional Research Service report said that each F-35 required 417kg of rare-earth materials


The Chinese move follows deteriorating Sino-US relations and an emerging technology war between the two countries. The Trump administration tried to make it harder for Chinese companies to import sensitive US technology, such as high-end semiconductors. The Biden administration has signalled that it would also restrict certain exports but would work more closely with allies. Beijing’s control of rare earths threatens to become a new source of friction with Washington but some warn any aggressive moves by China could backfire by prompting rivals to develop their own production capacity. In a November report, Zhang Rui, an analyst at Antaike, a government-backed consultancy in Beijing, said that US weapons makers could be among the first companies targeted by any export restriction. China’s foreign ministry said last year it would sanction Lockheed Martin, Boeing and Raytheon for selling arms to Taiwan, the self-ruled island that Beijing claims as its sovereign territory. The proposed guidelines would require rare earth producers to follow export control laws that regulate shipments of materials that “help safeguard state security”. China’s State Council and Central Military Commission will have the final say on whether the list should include rare earths. Rare earth minerals are also central to the manufacture of products including smartphones, electric vehicles and wind turbines. The F-35 relies on rare earths for critical components such as electrical power systems © George Frey/Bloomberg Some executives and officials are, however, questioning the wisdom of formally including rare earths in the export control regime. They argue that it would motivate Beijing’s rivals to accelerate their own production capacities and undermine China’s dominance of the industry. “Export controls are a doubled-edged sword that should be applied very carefully,” said Zhang of Antaike. The Pentagon has become increasingly concerned about the US reliance on China for rare earths that are used in everything from precision-guided missiles to drones. Ellen Lord, the top defence official for acquisitions until last year, told Congress in October that the US needed to create stockpiles of certain rare earths and re-establish domestic processing. She said the US had a “real vulnerability” because China floods the market to destroy any competition any time nations are about to start mining or producing. In recent months, the Pentagon has signed contracts with American and Australian miners to boost their onshore refining capacity and reduce their reliance on Chinese refiners. The US National Security Council did not respond to a request for comment. Why China's control of rare earths matters Chinese rare earth miners themselves are worried about the enhanced power the regulations would give MIIT to control their output. China began setting rare earth production limits in 2007 to keep prices high and reduce pollution but the policy is not legally binding and many miners regularly exceed their output quota. The latest regulations would allow the government to impose steep fines for unapproved sales. “The new rule is not going to make China stronger in the global supply chain when local mines can’t operate at full capacity and an export ban is easier said than done,” said an executive, who asked not to be identified, at Guangdong Rare Earth Group, one of the nation’s largest rare earth groups. In a statement, MIIT said the new law would help “protect national interest and ensure the security of strategic resources”. According to government statistics, China’s demand for rare earths is so high that it has consistently exceeded domestic supply over the past five years, prompting a surge of Chinese imports from miners in the US and Myanmar. Recommended News in-depthThe Big Read US-China: Washington revives plans for its rare earths industry A wide range of industries are driving demand for the strategic resource, including China’s electric vehicle and wind power generation sectors. “China’s economic planners have failed to predict the surge in rare earth consumption,” said an executive at Gold Dragon Rare Earth Co in south-eastern Fujian Province. “China’s own rare earth security isn’t guaranteed,” said David Zhang, an analyst at Sublime China Information, a consultancy. “It can disappear when the US-China relationship deteriorates or Myanmar’s generals decide to shut the border.” While China’s dominance in rare earth mining is under threat, it maintains a near monopoly in the refining process that turns ores into materials ready for manufacturers. The country controls about four-fifths of global rare earth refining capacity. Ores mined in the US must be sent to China as the US has no refining capacity of its own yet. Industry executives, however, said China’s strength in refining had more to do with its higher tolerance for pollution than any technological edge.

"

https://www.ft.com/content/d3ed83f4-19bc-4d16-b510-415749c032c1

Edited by herciv
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 40 minutes, herciv a dit :

Mission commune 2 x f-35 et 2 x F-16. La patrouille de 4 F-35 n'est donc pas une obligation.

https://youtu.be/YB7O96_GbVM

La question demeurant : pourquoi donc se sont-ils donc sentis forcés d'en envoyer 4 en Suisse comme en Finlande ?

Il y a 14 heures, Picdelamirand-oil a dit :

Si j'étais à la place des américains je raffinerais les terres rares extraites du sol Américain  en Inde.

Idée curieuse pour le moins : le volume de vrac à exporter serait très important, ça altèrerait les écosystèmes US quand même (même si les "inconvénients" du raffinage seraient déportés en Inde), et question souveraineté, c'est quand même une solution bâtarde.

N'y a-t-il rien à exploiter dans la vaste Australie plutôt ? Ca permettrait pour partie de compenser la guerre commerciale menée par la Chine à l'Australie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 1 heure, Boule75 a dit :

La question demeurant : pourquoi donc se sont-ils donc sentis forcés d'en envoyer 4 en Suisse comme en Finlande ?

Mon interprétation: 2 en l'air pour les tests demandés, 1 au sol pour faire du  "partage de poste de pilotage" avec les testeurs faute de biplace, 1 en réserve pour palier à toute pb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 2 heures, Boule75 a dit :

La question demeurant : pourquoi donc se sont-ils donc sentis forcés d'en envoyer 4 en Suisse comme en Finlande ?

Idée curieuse pour le moins : le volume de vrac à exporter serait très important, ça altèrerait les écosystèmes US quand même (même si les "inconvénients" du raffinage seraient déportés en Inde), et question souveraineté, c'est quand même une solution bâtarde.

N'y a-t-il rien à exploiter dans la vaste Australie plutôt ? Ca permettrait pour partie de compenser la guerre commerciale menée par la Chine à l'Australie.

Non mais c'est juste parce que pour l'instant ils l'envoient en Chine.

Edited by Picdelamirand-oil
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 2 heures, Boule75 a dit :

La question demeurant : pourquoi donc se sont-ils donc sentis forcés d'en envoyer 4 en Suisse comme en Finlande ?

 

il y a 13 minutes, Pakal a dit :

Mon interprétation: 2 en l'air pour les tests demandés, 1 au sol pour faire du  "partage de poste de pilotage" avec les testeurs faute de biplace, 1 en réserve pour palier à toute pb

Mon interprétation est moins optimiste :

1 en l'air pour les tests demandés,

- 1 au sol pour "partage de poste de pilotage" pendant que les mécanos bossent à l'arrière pour essayer de le réparer ("faites comme si on n'était pas là")

- 2 en réserve pour être sûrs avoir plus de chance de pouvoir tenir les deux postes précédents

 

Sortir, moi :huh: ? Vous y tenez :tongue: ?

  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le ‎17‎/‎02‎/‎2021 à 11:17, Alexis a dit :

 

Mon interprétation est moins optimiste :

1 en l'air pour les tests demandés,

- 1 au sol pour "partage de poste de pilotage" pendant que les mécanos bossent à l'arrière pour essayer de le réparer ("faites comme si on n'était pas là")

- 2 en réserve pour être sûrs avoir plus de chance de pouvoir tenir les deux postes précédents

 

Sortir, moi :huh: ? Vous y tenez :tongue: ?

Peut être que les Us veulent présenter leur système de partage des tâches dans une patrouille de 4 appareils. :biggrin:

Edited by xekueins
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 7 heures, Lordtemplar a dit :

https://breakingdefense.com/2021/02/clean-sheet-f-16-replacement-in-the-cards-csaf-brown/

Lancement d'une etude pour le remplacement du F16 avec un "gen 4+" ou "gen 5-".  Avec le NGAD + ce nouveau low cost gen5-, on voit bien que le Pentagon veut vite remplacer le F35. 

Il y a un article sur le même sujet sur le site Defense News. Apparemment l'option de remplacer les F-16 anciens par des plus récents serait toujours dans la balance :

https://www.defensenews.com/air/2021/02/18/the-air-force-is-interested-in-buying-a-budget-conscious-clean-sheet-fighter-to-replace-the-f-16/

Citation

 

Brown said he is still yet to be convinced that the F-16 is the right option.

“I don’t know that it actually would be the F-16. Actually, I want to be able to build something new and different that’s not the F-16 — that has some of those capabilities, but gets there faster and features a digital approach,” he said. “I realize that folks have alluded that it will be a particular airplane. But I’m open to looking at other platforms to see what that right force mix is.”

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Deltafan
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 1 heure, Deltafan a dit :
Citation

Brown said he is still yet to be convinced that the F-16 is the right option.

“I don’t know that it actually would be the F-16. Actually, I want to be able to build something new and different that’s not the F-16 — that has some of those capabilities, but gets there faster and features a digital approach,” he said. “I realize that folks have alluded that it will be a particular airplane. But I’m open to looking at other platforms to see what that right force mix is.”

 

Avec le concept "century series" qui a partiellement aidé à sortir un proto NGAD en 1 an, et le fait que de nombreuses compagnies sont désormais, ou sont redevenues, aptes à produire des gros avions d'entraînement très capables, il y a vraiment matière à se demander pourquoi ils voudraient prendre une resucée de F-16 plutôt que miser sur un nouvel avion. Ou même pourquoi LM ne voudrait pas grandement moderniser le F-16 en proposant une version NGà la cellule fortement différente, prenant appui sur les nombreux concepts qui ont vu le jour autour du F-16, notamment le F-16 XL.

De plus, il n'y a pas que LM dans le business des avions de combat, et avec le paquet de merde qu'ils ont fait sur le F-35, j'ose espérer qu'ils ne seront plus considérés comme les meilleurs à l'avenir.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 11 minutes, Patrick a dit :

Avec le concept "century series" qui a partiellement aidé à sortir un proto NGAD en 1 an, et le fait que de nombreuses compagnies sont désormais, ou sont redevenues, aptes à produire des gros avions d'entraînement très capables, il y a vraiment matière à se demander pourquoi ils voudraient prendre une resucée de F-16 plutôt que miser sur un nouvel avion. Ou même pourquoi LM ne voudrait pas grandement moderniser le F-16 en proposant une version NGà la cellule fortement différente, prenant appui sur les nombreux concepts qui ont vu le jour autour du F-16, notamment le F-16 XL.

De plus, il n'y a pas que LM dans le business des avions de combat, et avec le paquet de merde qu'ils ont fait sur le F-35, j'ose espérer qu'ils ne seront plus considérés comme les meilleurs à l'avenir.

Peut-être que chez LM ils sont dans une impasse. S’ils développent une version trop différente du F-16 ce sera un énorme désaveu pour le F-35. Remarque, ce n’est peut-être qu’une question de temps et ils y viendront en douceur, en sifflotant, l’air de rien. Restera plus qu’à repenser la com.

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ils sont bloqués aussi avec leur concept de "générations" entre la 4G qui perdure, la 5G qui ne marche pas et la 6G qui arrive. Même quelqu'un qui ne connaît absolument pas le domaine se rend compte qu'il y a un problème logique gros comme un camion. Ça doit chauffer chez les communicants, qui vont devoir déconstruire leur narration pour en construire une nouvelle. J'ai hâte de voir ce qu'ils vont nous sortir.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 11 minutes, Surjoueur a dit :

Ils sont bloqués aussi avec leur concept de "générations" entre la 4G qui perdure, la 5G qui ne marche pas et la 6G qui arrive. Même quelqu'un qui ne connaît absolument pas le domaine se rend compte qu'il y a un problème logique gros comme un camion. Ça doit chauffer chez les communicants, qui vont devoir déconstruire leur narration pour en construire une nouvelle. J'ai hâte de voir ce qu'ils vont nous sortir.

C’est déjà fait, la solution date. 
ils vont changer la def de la 5 eme gen en fonction de ce qui les arrange. Au départ ça correspondait exactement au f22 puis lm change en fonction des points forts du f35. La super croisière et l’hypermoeuvrabilite ont ainsi disparu de la def. la furtivite du f117 ne l’a jamais empêché d’être classé en gen 4...

dernierment lm mais l’accent sur la mise en réseau et la fusion de données. Des domaines ou Saab et dassault ont une avance reconnue.

boieng a plus de mal mais tente quand même entre growler et b3 tueur de 5gen ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 46 minutes, FAFA a dit :

Peut-être que chez LM ils sont dans une impasse. S’ils développent une version trop différente du F-16 ce sera un énorme désaveu pour le F-35. Remarque, ce n’est peut-être qu’une question de temps et ils y viendront en douceur, en sifflotant, l’air de rien. Restera plus qu’à repenser la com.

Il est clair que le rôle supposé du F-35, celui d'avion à tout faire, et surtout à tout remplacer, lui colle à la peau.
Cependant la communication autour du F-16 Viper block 70 parle désormais de "technologies issues du F-35" qui y sont intégrées. Je pense que si LM arrivent à vendre le F-35 comme un node, un engin qui permet aux autres d'exister, un "mini-awacs" comme on pu le lire il y a des années, ça peut passer assez tranquillement auprès de la clientèle déjà acquise.

Cependant il leur faudra toujours continuer à vendre des avions. Donc oui, à moins de fournir un chasseur très léger, très simple, très rustique, pour les clients pauvres ou ceux qui ne peuvent faire autrement, ou ceux qui n'ayant pas assez de F-35 devront acquérir de la masse différemment, il n'y a pas vraiment de plus-value à réaliser un nouveau chasseur. Le F-16 peut-il être ce nouvel avion? En l'état non.

Une version modernisée du F-16, modifiée sera peut-être encore trop chère et trop capable.
Un sous-Gripen, entre le trainer et le petit jet de combat, à la manière du M-345 mais en plus performant sur tout le spectre, pourrait en revanche séduire pas mal de monde.

 

il y a 14 minutes, Surjoueur a dit :

Ils sont bloqués aussi avec leur concept de "générations" entre la 4G qui perdure, la 5G qui ne marche pas et la 6G qui arrive. Même quelqu'un qui ne connaît absolument pas le domaine se rend compte qu'il y a un problème logique gros comme un camion. Ça doit chauffer chez les communicants, qui vont devoir déconstruire leur narration pour en construire une nouvelle. J'ai hâte de voir ce qu'ils vont nous sortir.

Vu qu'on entend parler de génération "5-" ça risque d'être drôle en effet.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 6 heures, FAFA a dit :

Peut-être que chez LM ils sont dans une impasse. S’ils développent une version trop différente du F-16 ce sera un énorme désaveu pour le F-35. Remarque, ce n’est peut-être qu’une question de temps et ils y viendront en douceur, en sifflotant, l’air de rien. Restera plus qu’à repenser la com.

 

Apparemment si il y ades décisions de prise c'est l'année prochaine pour le budget Fy23.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bon comment vont réagir les différents clients non US maintenant ?

1  - Tout va très bien madame la marquise => ca a bien fonctionné jusqu'à maintenant donc pourquoi pas ! Mais tenir une posture défensive face à la Chine avec le f-35 va être plus compliqué maintenant.

2 - On stoppe les appros de f-35 on remet en place un programme de nouveau chasseur ?

3 - On stoppe les appros et on tente de faire vivre les anciennes solutions plus longtemps ?

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 8 heures, Surjoueur a dit :

Ils sont bloqués aussi avec leur concept de "générations" entre la 4G qui perdure, la 5G qui ne marche pas et la 6G qui arrive. Même quelqu'un qui ne connaît absolument pas le domaine se rend compte qu'il y a un problème logique gros comme un camion. Ça doit chauffer chez les communicants, qui vont devoir déconstruire leur narration pour en construire une nouvelle. J'ai hâte de voir ce qu'ils vont nous sortir.

Ils ont déjà sorti la 5G -  pour moins chère :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 5 heures, herciv a dit :

Bon comment vont réagir les différents clients non US maintenant ?

1  - Tout va très bien madame la marquise => ca a bien fonctionné jusqu'à maintenant donc pourquoi pas ! Mais tenir une posture défensive face à la Chine avec le f-35 va être plus compliqué maintenant.

2 - On stoppe les appros de f-35 on remet en place un programme de nouveau chasseur ?

3 - On stoppe les appros et on tente de faire vivre les anciennes solutions plus longtemps ?

1 pour les payeurs de pizzo qui ne font pas la guerre, ou seulement modérément.
2 pour les opérationnels US.
3 pour les pas encore clients qui pourront se rabattre sur des F-16/15/18.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,798
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    FredX
    Newest Member
    FredX
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.3k
    Total Topics
    1.5m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...