Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Marine Australienne: modernisations, acquisitions et exercices navals.


Philippe Top-Force
 Share

Recommended Posts

il y a 6 minutes, Nec temere a dit :

Il me semble que ça a été envisagé ou même réalisé par la Navy. Faut découper la coque toussa toussa. Quelque chose de très artisanal en somme.

Conclusion ça va couter une cou*lle...

Alors c’est pas prevu, il faut comprendre qu’il y a pas d’acces prevu. Apres decouper et recoller bonjour le perle. Enfin ca va couter mais ca va aussi demander des resources industriels que les usa n’ont peut etre pas. Un atm ca se prepare tres a l’avance et ca demande des installations 

Edited by wagdoox
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 11 minutes, wagdoox a dit :

Alors c’est pas prevu, il faut comprendre qu’il y a pas d’acces prevu. Apres decouper et recoller bonjour le perle. Enfin ca va couter mais ca va aussi demander des resources industriels que les usa n’ont peut etre pas. Un atm ca se prepare tres a l’avance et ca demande des installations 

On est bien d'accord là dessus. C'est pas très réaliste comme projet...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 44 minutes, wagdoox a dit :

Alors c’est pas prevu, il faut comprendre qu’il y a pas d’acces prevu. Apres decouper et recoller bonjour le perle. Enfin ca va couter mais ca va aussi demander des resources industriels que les usa n’ont peut etre pas. Un atm ca se prepare tres a l’avance et ca demande des installations 

en fait, les soums americains, c'est du consommable. quand les piles sont usées, tu jette le tout. :chirolp_iei:

 

  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

En attendant les sous-marins nucléaires, une resucée de sous-marins diesel-électriques ?

https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/submarine-taskforce-mulls-son-of-collins-before-nuclear-boats-arrive-20211116-p59995

Quote

While the nuclear-powered submarine taskforce is concentrating on acquiring submarines from the United States and Britain under the AUKUS arrangements, sources said the chief of the taskforce, Vice-Admiral Jonathan Mead, had a remit that also includes looking at interim submarine capability.

The government had initially floated leasing a British or American nuclear-powered submarine until the first of the new boats were delivered, but this is viewed as increasingly unlikely.

Admiral Mead told a budget estimates committee last month Defence wanted at least one nuclear submarine, and ideally more, before 2040 and was working to accelerate that timetable.

In the meantime, all six Collins-class submarines will have their lives extended for another 10 years, beginning in 2026 and two years thereafter. However, that means the first submarine is due to retire in 2038, cutting it fine if there are any delays with the nuclear program.

Navy chief Mike Noonan has left open the possibility of carrying out a second life extension to the Collins-class submarines, but sources said the price difference between refurbishing an ageing submarine and building a brand new diesel-electric boat based on the Collins but with more modern systems would be comparatively small.

ASC has conducted comprehensive studies on modernising the existing Collins-class submarines, which drawing upon the original design could form the basis a new boat.

“Building a new Collins-class submarine would give you more capability and keep the workforce together in Adelaide. And you are not trying to force a 40-year-old submarine to do stuff,” one source said.

The fresh consideration of interim submarine capabilities comes after Defence Department Secretary Greg Moriarty told Senate estimates last month the department had “not at the moment” provided advice to government on the matter.

“The focus of the Nuclear-Powered Submarine Task Force is to work closely with the UK and US over the next 18 months to identify the optimal pathway to deliver at least eight nuclear-powered submarines for Australia,” the department said in a statement.

“In parallel, the government is investing between $4.3 – 6.4 billion in the life-of-type extension of all six Collins class submarines. The Collins class submarine to this day remains one of the most capable conventional submarines in the world.”

Australian Strategic Policy Institute analyst Marcus Hellyer said building a “son of Collins” had problems, including that original component manufacturers were no longer around and the navy was reluctant to operate three classes of submarines, but nevertheless it could help mitigate risk.

“We’re in a bad situation. But it is definitely worth exploring in a serious way,” he said.

“You line up the schedule [for retirement of the Collins and delivery of the nuclear-powered submarines], and it doesn’t line up. If your delivery drumbeat for the nuclear-powered submarines is greater than two years, you are getting new boats slower than the old ones are retired.”

The Australian Industry and Defence Network said while a decision on an interim submarine was a matter for the government, such a program would benefit local defence contractors and preserve the capabilities created by the cancelled French submarine program

“It would allow an Australian workforce to be grown and prepared for the construction of the nuclear submarine. It would allow Australian Industry to efficiently and effectively establish itself for the coming task,” chief executive Brent Clark said.

 

Edited by Rivelo
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 11 heures, Rivelo a dit :

The Australian Industry and Defence Network said while a decision on an interim submarine was a matter for the government, such a program would benefit local defence contractors and preserve the capabilities created by the cancelled French submarine program

“It would allow an Australian workforce to be grown and prepared for the construction of the nuclear submarine. It would allow Australian Industry to efficiently and effectively establish itself for the coming task,” chief executive Brent Clark said.

Moralité : ils vont faire des soum moins capables que les Attacks, forcément très différents des Collins et avec un décalage de 2 à 3 ans minimum... et toujours en se basant sur la base industrielle locale qui manque de pratique en la matière.

Moralité c'est comme en 40 où on vire Gamelin pour faire venir Weygand qui mets du temps pour arriver de Syrie... et qui applique le plan Gamzlin.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 30 minutes, wagdoox a dit :

Et elle est de plus en plus drôle ...

Je pense que l'on s'achemine lentement (enfin non de mois en moins lentement) mais sûrement (de plus en plus) vers un pré-positionnement d'unités US en Australie comme au bon vieux temps du "Silent Service" de feu l'Admiral Lockwood ... et ce durant presque 20 ans ...

  • Upvote 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 58 minutes, wagdoox a dit :

Pour remplacer des conventionnelles taillé pour eux ils vont faire construire des SNA adapté, pour les calendes grecques et entre temps acheté de nouveaux conventionnelles mais probablement pas adapté ?

Mais à quel moment ça pourra passer au niveau des représentants élus ? 

C'est plus une blague c'est un sketch des guignols...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 30 minutes, Nec temere a dit :

Mais à quel moment ça pourra passer au niveau des représentants élus ? 

Pour l’instant ca passe parce que les parlementaires de son camps en ont besoin. Et ceux d’en face sont ravis de ne plus trainer un programme de plus de 100 milliards. 
des que le programme sera clair et detailler (surtout la facture), l’australie signera un truc pour avoir des soum chinois nec+ultra. Et que des les chinois presenteront la facture, l’australie demandra aux martiens un entreprise…

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Citation

Australia and Nuclear-Powered Submarines

By Norman Friedman November 2021

Proceedings Vol. 147/11/1,425

In September, the Australian government announced it would buy nuclear-powered rather than conventionally powered submarines to replace its six Collins-class diesel-electric boats. The announcement was surprising, because for years Australia had resisted the logic that the sheer size of the region in which its navy operates demands nuclear power. In fact, the country had steadfastly resisted any application of nuclear power, although it mines and exports uranium in considerable quantity.

The dramatic shift in submarine policy came as part of a trilateral security partnership known as AUKUS, intended to enhance the alliance among Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. The pact reflects the growing sense of urgency to confront Chinese aggressiveness and coercion. Not surprisingly, the Chinese government strongly de-nounced the submarine deal.

The deal meant canceling an order for 12 non-nuclear submarines that would have been built in collaboration with the French Naval Group. The French boats often were described as versions of the current French nuclear-powered attack submarine, but with a diesel-electric plant in place of the nuclear-powered one. The project would have doubled the size of Australia’s submarine force, but the Australians were already unhappy about the escalating price of the French project. Not surprisingly, the French were furious at its cancellation. But once the Australians had decided to adopt nuclear power, they preferred to buy the most advanced available technology, which is British and American. The Royal Australian Navy already uses a version of the current U.S. submarine command-and-control system and a version of the standard U.S. submarine torpedo.

For the United States, the decision to join with Australia in a nuclear submarine program is equally striking. Until now, only the Royal Navy has received U.S. nuclear technology, under a 1958 agreement that gives the United States a veto over Britain transferring it to another party. For a brief period during the late 1950s, U.S. policy encouraged allied navies to adopt nuclear-powered submarines. Canada considered doing so for about a year, and it appears so did Italy and the Netherlands. The possibility of transferring nuclear submarine technology did not arise again until 1986, when the Canadians considered buying either the British Trafalgar-class or the French Rubis-class submarines, opting for the former before abandoning the project in April 1989.

The U.S. partnership with the Royal Navy in submarine development has been very close. Although the United States provided the prototype British nuclear submarine powerplant, the British made important contributions to U.S. submarine design, such as the concept of rafting for silencing and initial types of pump-jets. The significance of AUKUS is that the Australians are gaining access to the full range of U.S. and British technology, because both nations consider it essential for their Pacific partner to be as capable as possible.

The USS Olympia (SSN-717) departs Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for the 2016 Rim of the Pacific exercise. Recently decommissioned Los Angeles–class submarines such as the Olympia could be transferred to Australia for training purposes before their nuclear-powered submarines come into service. Credit: U.S. Navy (Gabrielle Joyner)

For many years, the Royal Australian Navy has faced a difficult problem with its submarine operations. Submarines are a vital means of gathering intelligence. There are alternatives, but the targets of intelligence-gathering generally can tell when they—mainly aircraft and satellites—are in position. Only submarines are both effective and covert. Keeping a non-nuclear submarine on station far from home for protracted periods is challenging. As with the United States, Australian naval bases are far from areas of great interest.

Nuclear-powered boats, while more expensive than conventional submarines, can deploy great distances at high speed and achieve maximum time on station, while also providing better crew habitability. Because they spend considerably less time on passage to and from a distant area, they can do the same surveillance work as conventionally powered ones with fewer platforms. Nuclear-powered submarines also are likely to be far more survivable in the face of antisubmarine warfare measures. For example, they are often faster than surface ships hunting them.

Modern diesel-electric submarines do offer advantages. They are less expensive and inherently quiet, while nuclear-powered submarines take considerable effort to silence. Diesel-electric submarines also can safely sit on the sea floor to hide. But they cannot offer surplus power to operate sensors, and they are not fast enough (on a sustained basis) to get out of trouble if they reveal themselves. For example, many diesel-electric submarines are credited with maximum submerged speeds of about 20 knots that can be sustained for only 15 minutes to an hour. Some diesel-electric submarines have air-independent propulsion, which enables more protracted operations, but at low speed. Only nuclear powerplants have the energy density to achieve very high sustained performance.

China doubtless sees its growing fleet as a means to coerce other countries in the region. Anything that reduces the value of that fleet helps countries such as the Philippines and Malaysia resist Beijing’s maritime pressure campaign. More adversary nuclear-powered submarines operating in the region must be very high on that list.

For example, more nuclear-powered submarines place China’s new aircraft carriers at higher risk. At the very least, more nuclear-powered submarines in the region greatly increase the price China must pay to keep its fleet credible. Australia’s increased capability may well deepen its ties to countries in Southeast Asia that feel threatened by Chinese power.

Australia’s decision will add nuclear-powered submarines to a region that already has many. China operates a substantial nuclear-powered submarine fleet, which is likely to expand considerably in the near future. India already has a nuclear-powered ballistic-missile submarine, using Russian reactor technology, and has leased (and recently returned) a Russian nuclear-powered attack submarine. There is a serious Indian Navy proposal to build six nuclear-powered attack submarines, to replace its aging diesel submarine fleet. And to the extent that Russia is an Asian power, it has a large regional nuclear-powered submarine fleet.

For France, the loss of the large Australian submarine contract may be a hint that it should offer its own nuclear submarine technology to prospective buyers. In recent years, the French Naval Group has been successful in selling conventionally powered attack submarines, but that market may be nearly saturated. France is not under any legal constraint in selling its own type of nuclear-powered submarine; the only problem may be the cost of its nuclear technology.

For Australia, the United States probably could lend or transfer existing U.S. nuclear-powered submarines. Many Los Angeles–class boats were laid up instead of being refueled; some still exist. They could be refueled, modernized, and brought back to operational status. Australian crews could be trained to operate them. Experience with these submarines would allow Australian submariners to learn to operate nuclear-powered submarines before Australia has to man its own.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/26/2021 at 4:41 PM, pascal said:

Australia and Nuclear-Powered Submarines

By Norman Friedman November 2021

Proceedings Vol. 147/11/1,425

In September, the Australian government announced it would buy nuclear-powered rather than conventionally ...

La source (ou en tous cas une source, mais pas gratuite)

Et une traduction (maintenant que je peux à nouveau utiliser DeepL :biggrin:

Spoiler

L'Australie et les sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire

Par Norman Friedman, Novemrbre 2021

En septembre, le gouvernement australien a annoncé qu'il achèterait des sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire plutôt que conventionnelle pour remplacer ses six bateaux diesel-électriques de la classe Collins. Cette annonce a été surprenante, car pendant des années, l'Australie a résisté à la logique selon laquelle la taille même de la région dans laquelle opère sa marine exigeait l'utilisation de l'énergie nucléaire. En fait, le pays s'est fermement opposé à toute application de l'énergie nucléaire, bien qu'il exploite et exporte de l'uranium en quantité considérable.

Le changement radical de la politique en matière de sous-marins s'inscrit dans le cadre d'un partenariat de sécurité trilatéral connu sous le nom d'AUKUS, destiné à renforcer l'alliance entre l'Australie, les États-Unis et le Royaume-Uni. Le pacte reflète le sentiment croissant d'urgence à faire face à l'agressivité et à la coercition de la Chine. Il n'est pas surprenant que le gouvernement chinois ait fermement dénoncé l'accord sur les sous-marins.

L'accord impliquait l'annulation d'une commande de 12 sous-marins non nucléaires qui auraient été construits en collaboration avec le groupe naval français. Les bateaux français ont souvent été décrits comme des versions de l'actuel sous-marin d'attaque à propulsion nucléaire français, mais avec un moteur diesel-électrique à la place du moteur nucléaire. Ce projet aurait permis de doubler la taille de la force sous-marine australienne, mais les Australiens étaient déjà mécontents de l'escalade des prix du projet français. Il n'est donc pas surprenant que les Français soient furieux de l'annulation du projet. Mais une fois que les Australiens ont décidé d'adopter l'énergie nucléaire, ils ont préféré acheter la technologie disponible la plus avancée, c'est-à-dire britannique et américaine. La Royal Australian Navy utilise déjà une version du système actuel de commande et de contrôle des sous-marins américains et une version de la torpille standard des sous-marins américains.

Pour les États-Unis, la décision de s'associer à l'Australie dans un programme de sous-marins nucléaires est tout aussi frappante. Jusqu'à présent, seule la Royal Navy a reçu la technologie nucléaire américaine, en vertu d'un accord de 1958 qui donne aux États-Unis un droit de veto sur le transfert par la Grande-Bretagne de cette technologie à une autre partie. Pendant une brève période à la fin des années 1950, la politique américaine a encouragé les marines alliées à adopter des sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire. Le Canada a envisagé de le faire pendant environ un an, et il semble que l'Italie et les Pays-Bas aient fait de même. La possibilité de transférer la technologie des sous-marins nucléaires ne s'est pas présentée de nouveau avant 1986, lorsque les Canadiens ont envisagé d'acheter soit les sous-marins britanniques de classe Trafalgar, soit les sous-marins français de classe Rubis, optant pour les premiers avant d'abandonner le projet en avril 1989.

Le partenariat entre les États-Unis et la Royal Navy en matière de développement de sous-marins a été très étroit. Bien que les États-Unis aient fourni le prototype de la centrale nucléaire britannique pour les sous-marins, les Britanniques ont apporté d'importantes contributions à la conception des sous-marins américains, comme le concept de rafting pour le silencieux et les premiers types de pump-jets. La signification de l'AUKUS est que les Australiens ont accès à toute la gamme des technologies américaines et britanniques, car les deux nations considèrent qu'il est essentiel que leur partenaire du Pacifique soit aussi performant que possible.

L'USS Olympia (SSN-717) quitte Pearl Harbor, à Hawaï, pour l'exercice 2016 Rim of the Pacific. Les sous-marins de classe Los Angeles récemment mis hors service, tels que l'Olympia, pourraient être transférés en Australie à des fins de formation avant l'entrée en service de leurs sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire. Crédit : U.S. Navy (Gabrielle Joyner)

Depuis de nombreuses années, la Royal Australian Navy est confrontée à un problème difficile concernant ses opérations sous-marines. Les sous-marins sont un moyen essentiel de collecte de renseignements. Il existe des alternatives, mais les cibles de la collecte de renseignements peuvent généralement savoir quand elles sont en position, principalement les avions et les satellites. Seuls les sous-marins sont à la fois efficaces et discrets. Maintenir un sous-marin non nucléaire en station loin de chez soi pendant de longues périodes est un défi. Comme aux États-Unis, les bases navales australiennes sont éloignées des zones d'intérêt stratégiques.

Les bateaux à propulsion nucléaire, bien que plus coûteux que les sous-marins conventionnels, peuvent se déployer sur de grandes distances à grande vitesse et atteindre un temps maximal en station, tout en offrant une meilleure habitabilité à l'équipage. Comme ils passent beaucoup moins de temps à se rendre dans une zone éloignée et à en revenir, ils peuvent effectuer le même travail de surveillance que les sous-marins à propulsion conventionnelle avec moins de plates-formes. Les sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire sont également susceptibles d'avoir une bien meilleure capacité de survie face aux mesures de lutte anti-sous-marine. Par exemple, ils sont souvent plus rapides que les navires de surface qui les chassent.

Les sous-marins diesel-électriques modernes présentent des avantages. Ils sont moins chers et intrinsèquement silencieux, alors que les sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire nécessitent des efforts considérables pour les rendre silencieux. Les sous-marins diesel-électriques peuvent également se cacher en toute sécurité au fond de la mer. Mais ils ne peuvent pas offrir un surplus de puissance pour faire fonctionner les capteurs, et ils ne sont pas assez rapides (sur une base soutenue) pour se tirer d'affaire s'ils se révèlent. Par exemple, de nombreux sous-marins diesel-électriques sont crédités de vitesses submergées maximales d'environ 20 nœuds qui ne peuvent être maintenues que pendant 15 minutes à une heure. Certains sous-marins diesel-électriques ont une propulsion indépendante de l'air, ce qui permet des opérations plus longues, mais à faible vitesse. Seules les centrales nucléaires ont la densité énergétique nécessaire pour atteindre des performances soutenues très élevées.

La Chine considère sans aucun doute sa flotte croissante comme un moyen de contraindre les autres pays de la région. Tout ce qui peut réduire la valeur de cette flotte aide des pays comme les Philippines et la Malaisie à résister à la campagne de pression maritime de Pékin. L'augmentation du nombre de sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire adverses opérant dans la région doit figurer en tête de cette liste.

Par exemple, un plus grand nombre de sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire fait courir un risque plus élevé aux nouveaux porte-avions chinois. À tout le moins, l'augmentation du nombre de sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire dans la région accroît considérablement le prix que la Chine doit payer pour maintenir la crédibilité de sa flotte. La capacité accrue de l'Australie pourrait bien renforcer ses liens avec les pays d'Asie du Sud-Est qui se sentent menacés par la puissance chinoise.

La décision de l'Australie ajoutera des sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire à une région qui en compte déjà beaucoup. La Chine exploite une importante flotte de sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire, qui est susceptible de s'étendre considérablement dans un avenir proche. L'Inde possède déjà un sous-marin nucléaire lanceur d'engins, qui utilise la technologie des réacteurs russes, et a loué (et récemment rendu) un sous-marin d'attaque russe à propulsion nucléaire. La marine indienne propose sérieusement de construire six sous-marins d'attaque à propulsion nucléaire pour remplacer sa flotte vieillissante de sous-marins diesel. Et dans la mesure où la Russie est une puissance asiatique, elle dispose d'une importante flotte régionale de sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire.

Pour la France, la perte de l'important contrat de sous-marins australiens peut être un signe qu'elle devrait proposer sa propre technologie de sous-marins nucléaires aux acheteurs potentiels. Ces dernières années, le groupe naval français a réussi à vendre des sous-marins d'attaque à propulsion conventionnelle, mais ce marché est peut-être presque saturé. La France n'est soumise à aucune contrainte juridique pour vendre son propre type de sous-marin à propulsion nucléaire ; le seul problème pourrait être le coût de sa technologie nucléaire.

Pour l'Australie, les États-Unis pourraient probablement prêter ou transférer des sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire américains existants. De nombreux bateaux de la classe Los Angeles ont été désarmés au lieu d'être ravitaillés ; certains existent encore. Ils pourraient être ravitaillés, modernisés et remis en état de fonctionnement. Des équipages australiens pourraient être formés pour les faire fonctionner. L'expérience de ces sous-marins permettrait aux sous-mariniers australiens d'apprendre à faire fonctionner des sous-marins à propulsion nucléaire avant que l'Australie ne doive faire fonctionner les siens.

Le monsieur semble assez porté sur le sujet, analyste de défense et spécialiste de l'histoire militaire (une partie en tous cas, apparemment centré sur l'USN) pour l'US Naval Institute : 
https://www.usni.org/people/norman-friedman
Ce qui me surprend est qu'il n'est pas Australien mais bien citoyen étatsunien.
Je suis assez curieux à propos d'une de ses publications justement : https://nsc.crawford.anu.edu.au/publication/15176/strategic-submarines-and-strategic-stability-looking-towards-2030s , mais j'y jetterai un oeil plus tard.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Je ne savais pas où placer cette info....

US Holds Joint Exercises ANNUALEX 2021 with Major Global Powers Aimed at Deterring Aggression

On Nov. 30, naval forces from the United States, Australia, Germany, Japan, and Canada concluded ANNUALEX 2021, a nine-day multilateral, multinational annual joint military exercise held in the Philippine Sea. 

The five participating navies included the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), Royal Canadian Navy (RCN), German Navy (GMN), Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), and the U.S. Navy. Thirty-five ships and dozens of fighter jets joined the exercise. 

Germany joined the exercise for the first time in 20 years

It appears as though China’s provocative actions toward its neighbors have only drawn the allies closer. Besides the increased collaboration between allied countries demonstrated by AUKUS, America’s security partnership with the UK and Australia, other countries have also joined the league.

Germany’s frigate FGS Bayern (F 217) participated in the exercises in the Philippine Sea. Later, Tulsa had an opportunity to host Bayern crew members for ship tours while moored at the Naval Base in Guam.

https://www.visiontimes.com/2021/12/03/us-holds-joint-exercises-annualex-2021-with-major-global-powers-aimed-at-deterring-ccp-aggression.html

  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Je repense a froid à cette décision australienne.

Soit ils sont très cons, et on ne peut complètement écarter cette solution, sinon il était assez évident qu'ils n'auraient de nouveaux SNA que dans 15 ans au mieux.  Ils auraient pu couper la poire en deux et prendre 4 à 6 SF Barracuda (avec montage industriel comme au Brésil) puis négocier et acheter du SNA en complément, ensuite.

Perso vu les couts en jeu, je pense qu'ils n'auront pas 8 SNA, mais 5 ou 6 au plus.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 30 minutes, Bon Plan a dit :

Soit ils sont très cons, et on ne peut complètement écarter cette solution, sinon il était assez évident qu'ils n'auraient de nouveaux SNA que dans 15 ans au mieux.

Pas besoins d'être cons. Comme l'a expliqué Pascal plus haut, quand le contexte se tend brusquement ou du moins plus rapidement qu'on ne l'aurait imaginé, on peut parfois être pris par le vertige de la situation. Mais les gouvernants australiens peuvent également avoir estimé de manière réfléchie que s'associer aux USA constitue le meilleur moyen d'assurer la protection de leurs intérêts nationaux, quitte à ce que leur sous-marinade soit peu effective pendant quelques longues années.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 7 minutes, herciv a dit :

Et si on en croit ce rapport de l'ASPI le coût du programme sera au bas mot 50% plus cher.

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/implementing-australias-nuclear-submarine-program/

Donc au mieux 120 Mds de dollars ? Et 50% c'est pas tant que ça au regard du bordel.

J'ai encore du mal à me dire qu'ils ont fait ce choix dans leur intérêt...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,665
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    Godefroy de Bouillon
    Newest Member
    Godefroy de Bouillon
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.3k
    Total Topics
    1.5m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...