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Skynet 5A/B/C:

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MoD announces "ground-breaking" satellite

Mar 7 2007 5:00PM

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) confirmed it is launching a ground-breaking communications satellite.

Skynet 5A Satellite is scheduled to be fired off from French Guyana at the weekend and is designed to handle the long-haul communications requirements of Britain's armed forces, reports thepfi.net.

The next-generation innovation is expected to usher in a new era of satellite communications for use in military operations and the cutting-edge technology will provide the MoD with secure means of contact in all terrain.

Manufactured and managed by a division of Astrium Services, Skynet 5A will be set off from an Ariane launch transporter at the European Space Port and will be followed in later months by the 5B model and an orbiting spare 5C scheduled for space next year.

"The best armed forces in the world deserve the best communications service. And that is what we will provide with Skynet 5," commented Malcolm Peto, managing director of Astrium subsidiary Paradigm Secure Communications.

He added that the satellite will enable the MoD to deliver critical communications faster and more efficiently.

International company Astrium also supplies advanced technology military communication satellites to the ministry of defence in France as part of its framework deal with the French government.

Link: Skynet

Astrium UK, part d'un projet international:

Citation

Astrium launches Mercury probe build

Published: 28 February 2007 12:00 PM

ESA’s Science Programme Committee (SPC), has awarded EADS Astrium a €330m contract to build the Mercury probe BepiColombo, which is scheduled to begin its journey to Mercury in 2013.

BepiColombo will consist of three modules: a European orbiter, a Japanese orbiter and a transfer module carrying the two spacecraft to Mercury. The complete unit will have a height of approximately five metres and a mass of about three tonnes, of which about 50 per cent is propellant.

The European Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will be equipped with eleven sophisticated scientific instruments. Flying in a polar orbit, it will study Mercury for at least a year, imaging the planet’s surface, generating height profiles, and collecting data on Mercury’s composition and atmosphere.

The Japanese Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) will investigate the planet’s magnetic field with its five on-board instruments.

Astrium in Germany as prime contractor is responsible for the entire three-section spacecraft, leading an industrial core-team including Astrium in the UK and Alcatel Alenia Space in Italy. Attitude and orbit control design and development is also under German responsibility and the integration of the engineering model will also take place in Germany.

In the UK, Astrium is responsible for the electrical and chemical propulsion system as well as the complete MPO spacecraft structure. Alcatel Alenia Space will develop the MPO electrical power, thermal control and communications systems and is responsible for the integration and test activities. Astrium in France will develop the on-board software building on experienced gained on Rosetta, Mars Express and Venus Express.

One of the greatest challenges facing Astrium engineers is preparing BepiColombo for the extreme temperatures it will encounter. Close to Mercury, solar radiation is up to ten times stronger than on Earth, with temperatures of up to 470oC on the planet’s surface.

Experts at Astrium and at Alcatel Alenia Space will use a variety of techniques to protect the electronics and scientific instruments from the extreme heat including a newly designed insulating multi-layer blanket whose top layer is likely to be made using ceramic-fibres. A radiator will release the heat from the probe’s interior into space, whose design makes it less sensitive to the thermal infrared radiation emitted by the planet’s surface. In addition the spacecraft will use special solar arrays capable of supplying power even when temperatures reach 250oC.

The combination of a conventional chemical propulsion system with an innovative ion propulsion system will provide the required thrust on BepiColombo’s long journey. Several swing-by manoeuvres are planned to reach Mercury. During these manoeuvres, BepiColombo will be accelerated using the gravity fields of the Moon, Earth and Venus. BepiColombo is scheduled to reach its destination in 2019 and enter into a polar orbit after two further swing-by manoeuvres at Mercury.

Scheduled to explore Mercury for at least 12 months, the spacecraft’s mission may be extended by a further year. To date, planetary researchers know very little about the hottest planet in our solar system. Most of the detailed data comes from NASA’s Mariner 10 spacecraft which performed three flybys in the seventies and was able to image part of the planet.

Link: Astrium UK, part d'un projet international

Deuxieme satellite du SSTL pour Galileo:

Citation

ESA award SSTL contract to build a second GIOVE-A

5th March 2007

Today, the European Space Agency (ESA) awarded a contract to Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) to build a second satellite for the Galileo satellite navigation system. Named GIOVE-A2, the new satellite will be based on the company’s proven GIOVE-A medium Earth orbit satellite technology.

GIOVE-A2 will help maintain the critical International Telecommunications Union (ITU) frequency filing secured by its predecessor for a further 27 months and facilitate further development of ground equipment. SSTL’s Executive Chairman, Sir Martin Sweeting, commented, “With GIOVE-A, SSTL was able to provide ESA with a vital part of the Galileo system exactly when it was needed. GIOVE-A has performed well in orbit and we are very pleased to be working with ESA again on a second GIOVE satellite”.

Environmental monitoring is also an important ongoing mission objective for the new satellite. GIOVE-A was the first European satellite to be launched into medium Earth orbit (MEO) and it carries two environmental monitors. These units have been operated almost continuously since launch and are gathering vital data to characterise the Galileo orbit environment that will help in the design of the full constellation.

The new satellite will carry some enhancements over GIOVE-A that will allow additional signals to be generated and received on the ground. The aim will be to provide early in-orbit experimentation on the common baseline L1 open service signals recently recommended by the EU and US. In the future, these open service signals will provide free of charge position and timing competitive with other GNSS systems to users.

GIOVE-A was designed to broadcast Galileo signals from space so that Europe could claim the frequencies filed for Galileo with the ITU. Following a rapid development programme that started in the second half of 2003, the satellite was designed, built, tested and launched before the end of 2005. At 17:25 GMT on the 12th January 2006, the first Galileo signals were transmitted from the satellite. In March, ESA was able to confirm that it had brought the Galileo-related frequency filings into use, three months ahead of the official ITU deadline.

In addition to the frequency filing activity, GIOVE-A was required to broadcast navigation signals that have allowed testing of Galileo ground equipment during its ongoing 27-month mission, which is an essential activity to encourage uptake of Galileo in the user communities.

GIOVE-A also assisted ESA’s clock characterisation experiments. A highly accurate model was built from tracking the position of GIOVE-A that enabled ESA to test the performance of the satellite’s state-of-the-art onboard Rubidium atomic frequency clock. Initial results demonstrated the clocks to be highly accurate, proving technology that will be integral to all future Galileo satellites including GIOVE-A2.

The Royal Institute of Navigation recognised the contribution that GIOVE-A had made to navigation with the Harold Spencer Award, presented to SSTL by HRH Duke of Edinburgh in October of last year. Achievements in GIOVE-A also earned SSTL a “Times Higher Education Supplement’s Outstanding Contribution to Innovation & Technology” award.

Link: SSTL

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Où en est le projet d'exploration lunaire par les scientifiques de sa gracieuse majesté ? Les Allemands ont des projets ambitieux aussi en ce qui concerbe l'astre celeste (cf - le fil de discussion concernant l'allemagne sur cette même section), y-a-t-il une coopération possible entre vous ou l'agence spatiale britannique considère-t-elle comme son homologue allemande de mener ces projets en national pour ensuite essayer de prendre le lead sur un éventuel projet de l'ESA ?

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Où en est le projet d'exploration lunaire par les scientifiques de sa gracieuse majesté ? Les Allemands ont des projets ambitieux aussi en ce qui concerbe l'astre celeste (cf - le fil de discussion concernant l'allemagne sur cette même section), y-a-t-il une coopération possible entre vous ou l'agence spatiale britannique considère-t-elle comme son homologue allemande de mener ces projets en national pour ensuite essayer de prendre le lead sur un éventuel projet de l'ESA ?

On parle avec les USA pour une cooperation dans un projet d'exploration lunaire mais il y a aussi deux projets propose par SSTL. Ici, plus d'information:

Britain plans first Moon mission

By Pallab Ghosh

BBC science correspondent

Penetrator mission (SSTL)

The UK could soon have its first mission to the Moon - an orbiting spacecraft that would fire instruments into the lunar surface.

The "penetrators" would yield new information about the rocky interior.

The venture has been considered by Britain's astronomy funding agency, PParc, and has been presented to European partners.

The concept is the work of a consortium of space interests, including Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL).

SSTL's founder and chief executive, Professor Sir Martin Sweeting, says the costs of space exploration have fallen sufficiently for the UK to think about leading such a mission, which could be at the Moon by 2010.

Inside the Moon

The consortium proposed two lunar options.

Dr Andrew Coates, Mullard Space Science Lab

The first, named Moonlight, would despatch four suitcase-sized darts on to the lunar surface from orbit. The darts would be sent into craters across a wide area.

They would hit the ground at a high velocity (300m/s) and penetrate to a depth of 2m (6ft).

The darts could carry a small suite of instruments, such as seismometers to listen for "Moonquakes". Analysing these tremors would give scientists new insight into the make-up of the lunar interior.

According to Dr Andrew Coates, of the Mullard Space Science Lab and who has contributed to the concept study, the impactors would represent the first time there had been a detailed study of the Moon's sub-surface.

"There have been 12 astronauts on the Moon and more than 40 unmanned probes and yet we know surprisingly little about our nearest neighbour," he said.

"Previous missions have focussed on the side of the Moon that faces the Earth. Our plan with Moonlight is for the first time is to explore the mysterious far side of the Moon as well."

As well as Moonlight, the consortium proposed another mission called Moonraker. This is designed to land on the lunar surface.

Its scientific goal would be to study the lunar surface, perhaps at the poles or in the giant impact crater that resides on the far side of the Moon. It might also provide useful information for space agencies searching for suitable sites for eventual human habitation.

Economic gain

Britain's involvement in space has been as a partner in co-operation with Nasa and the European Space Agency (Esa); and that is unlikely to change. But Sir Martin feels the time is now right for the UK to try to push its ideas to the fore; it should try to lead these types of missions.

"For the first time, it's now affordable," he told BBC News. "Current small missions to the Moon cost about 500 million euros. With advances in small satellites, we could probably cut the cost to at least a fifth."

The missions would give UK scientists more opportunities to study the Moon; but, Sir Martin believes, they also present British industry with an incredible opportunity.

The Americans intend to set up a lunar colony; and the European, Indian and Chinese space agencies all have designs on the Moon.

Sir Martin thinks a UK-led "Moonshot" could provide the focus for British space companies to develop support technologies for what is rapidly turning into a 21st-Century space race.

"In the UK, we have tremendous expertise in this area. A UK Moon programme would enable us to get a foothold in what could turn out to be an economically important area for a relatively low cost," he argued.

Sir Martin thinks such a programme should be funded by industry and government.

He says that with sufficient support, a British conceived probe could be at the Moon by the decade's end.

Link: SSTL/UK possible moon mission

Nasa moon mission could include UK astronaut

James Randerson, science correspondent

Wednesday April 26, 2006

The Guardian

UK scientists are in talks with Nasa about joining the US space agency's plans to return to the moon. The mission could include a British crew member who would land on the surface.

The last mission to land on the moon was Apollo 17 in 1972, but no British astronaut has walked on the surface. Andrew Ball, a space scientist at the Open University, said the UK could provide a field geologist to go to the moon on a new mission: "That would bring the UK huge scientific benefits."

Dr Ball is part of a UK scientific delegation at Nasa's exploration strategy workshop this week, where Nasa officials are outlining US plans to return to the moon in 2018. David Parker, another delegate, from the British National Space Centre, the UK's space agency, said: "We have an open mind to see whether there are benefits from their programme. We want to be at least involved in the discussions at an early stage."

Dr Ball said the UK could offer expertise in analysis of extra-terrestrial rock samples, designing portable equipment to carry out analysis on the moon's surface, and building micro-satellites for relaying communications to the other side of the moon. In return for a significant contribution, the UK could claim a crew place on the mission. "If the UK is providing help in other ways it would be a fair exchange." Current government policy is for the UK not to take part in manned space missions, but Dr Ball said there would be huge scientific benefits.

Last year a report from the Royal Astronomical Society came to the same conclusion. Ken Pounds of the University of Leicester, one of the report's authors, said the moon, without an atmosphere or geological activity, would have evidence of the solar system's history. The moon is scattered with particles from the solar wind and ancient comets as well as rocks thrown up from the early Earth by meteorite collisions.

"We were very impressed by arguments that the moon is a great museum of everything that's been going on in the solar system," Prof Pounds said, adding: "We were persuaded that, for the time being, the only way to do this deep drilling was with humans with hard hats. It could be very depressing if most of the developed countries in the world were involved in a project and we were standing on the sidelines."

There would also be huge educational benefits. "Space projects involving humans are something that is very attractive to kids and can be a valuable hook to get kids interested in science."

Link: UK might join NASA in manned mission to the moon
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Le premier projet ressemble beaucoup au projet mené par la DLR (l'agence spatiale allemande). Ces projets rapportent beaucoup en terme d'images et de reconnaissance technique outre leur principal trait scientifique qui en fait leur intérêt. So good luck.

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SSTL-built satellite launched for the US Government

9th March 2007

British satellite engineering company, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL), in partnership with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the United States, has today, March 9th, launched the Cibola Flight Experiment Satellite (CFESat) from Cape Canaveral.

The satellite will conduct ionospheric and lightning studies by detecting and measuring impulsive events that occur in a complex background. The mission will also validate the on-orbit use of commercial, reconfigurable field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology, utilizing several different single-event upset mitigation schemes.

SSTL provided the CFESat platform based upon the avionics from the company’s current generation of enhanced microsatellites and previously used on missions such as the Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC) and TopSat. The structure is new and the high power demands of the payload have been satisfied by the provision of deployed solar panels employing triple junction GaAs cells mounted onto carbon fibre. Other new technologies accommodated on the spacecraft are deployable booms, a new type of launch-vehicle separation system and three inflatable antennas - one on the Earth-facing deck and one each on the two deployed booms.

CFESat was one of four satellites mounted on the DoD Space Test Program Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) using the EELV’s Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA). The ESPA allows up to six satellites to ‘piggy back’ on the launcher main payload, which for this launch was DARPA’s Orbital Express.

Following confirmation of separation of the launch vehicle, the ground station established contact with CFESat on the first visible pass. Commissioning of the satellite has progressed rapidly with no anomalies to report.

In order to fit into the allowable launch volume, the satellite body measures just 61 by 61 by 96 cm and weighs 160 kg. The satellite will be placed into an orbit with an altitude of 560 km (350 miles) and an orbital inclination that will allow observation of land areas as far north as the central United States and as far south as the tip of Africa.

Since contract award in February 2004, SSTL delivered a fully environmentally tested spacecraft bus to New Mexico in May 2006, ready to accept Los Alamos’s CFE payload, which is a reconfigurable processor that will survey portions of the VHF and UHF radio spectra. The experiment uses networks of reprogrammable FPGAs to process the received signals for ionospheric and lightning studies

A period of commissioning the spacecraft will now be undertaken at the Mission Control Centre (MCC) at LANL in New Mexico. The MCC was also supplied by SSTL at the same time as the satellite and commissioned last summer with SSTL engineers working with LANL in the US.

This latest success for SSTL follows the signing of contracts for an additional Disaster Monitoring Constellation satellite for Spanish company Deimos, and a high capability LEO Earth observation satellite for Nigeria’s National Space Research and Development Agency. Both contracts involve the provision of satellite platforms, imaging payloads and ground segment facilities.

Guildford-based SSTL already has considerable in-orbit experience with successful launches of 25 LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites that include the TopSat high resolution Earth observation satellite for the UK government, and the hugely successful international Disaster Monitoring Constellation satellites built by SSTL for the UK, Chinese, Algerian, Nigerian and Turkish governments. Today’s launch will further extend SSTL’s expertise in LEO missions.

From start to finish there has been less than three years from Cibola's selection for the STP-1 launch to the delivery of an advanced, fully space-qualified satellite to the launch site, which is a significant achievement.

Link: http://www.sstl.co.uk/index.php?loc=6
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  • 4 weeks later...

Russia places order with SSTL for satellite platform equipment

27th March 2007

World leading small satellite manufacturer Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has signed an order with the Federal State Unitary Enterprise - The Russian Research and Production Enterprise Pan-Russian Research Institute for Electromechanics (FSUE NPP VNIIEM) and Radioexport of Russia for the supply of satellite platform equipment and services for the KANOPUS Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Earth observation spacecraft.

The first satellite, KANOPUS-B, will be ready for launch in 2008. It will monitor the Earth's surface and will support the monitoring of disasters, agricultural planning and the management of water and coastal resources. Under the contract SSTL will supply FSUE NPP VNIIEM with the platform avionics equipment and software, and support their spacecraft assembly and integration activities in Russia.

The multimillion pound contract marks the beginning of a longer-term relationship between the companies, with at least two further projects on the agenda.

An FSUE NPP VNIIEM spokesperson commented: "It was essential for our company to select a partner with a proven track record in delivering flight-proven systems within extremely demanding schedules to ensure that we will be flight-ready in time for launch."

SSTL Executive Chairman, Sir Martin Sweeting, commented: "FSUE NPP VNIIEM's selection of SSTL reflects on our track record of consistently delivering successful small satellite missions, within fixed budgets and on schedule. This contract is a unique opportunity for FSUE NPP VNIIEM and SSTL to further develop its cooperation on future Russian small satellite projects".

Commercial Space Technologies (CST), based in London and Moscow, acted as SSTL's local representative in Russia to assist negotiations with NPP VNIIEM and Radioexport.

This success follows recent contract awards for two high capability Earth observation satellites: NigeriaSat-2 for Nigeria's National Space Research and Development Agency and an additional DMC satellite for Spanish company Deimos. Last month ESA awarded SSTL a follow-on contract for the supply of a second navigation satellite, GIOVE-A2. SSTL now has 12 new satellites under construction and test at its facilities in Guilford, England for customers in Europe, North America and Africa.

Earlier this month, SSTL's latest satellite, CFESat, a research satellite for the US Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory, was launched on an EELV from the Kennedy Space Centre.

Link:

Link de SSTL

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  • 3 weeks later...

UK looks to closer ties with Nasa

Image IPB

The UK already plays significant roles on some US-led missions

UK scientists and engineers look set for more and bigger roles in US space agency (Nasa) missions.

It follows the signing of a document of understanding between the Americans and the British National Space Centre, which coordinates UK space efforts.

A joint team will be established to examine the prospects for collaborative lunar robotic projects.

The next few years are likely to see a rush of missions going to the Moon to test technologies to take to Mars.

British researchers have already been studying a number of ideas that could contribute to this new wave of exploration.

These include small robotic orbiters and landers, and even dart technology that would allow instruments to be shot into the lunar soil as a spacecraft flew overhead.

Aspects of these mission architectures may now have more chance of flying.

New wave

The UK has a long history of successful collaboration on Nasa missions. The Americans' Stereo mission, recently launched to study the Sun, incorporates British camera-detector technology and a key instrument to follow ejections of solar material.

And for the Nasa Swift mission that detects gamma-ray bursts, the UK provided core telescope components and a data analysis centre.

Image IPB

Researchers have looked at dart technology to deploy instruments

Britain plans Moon mission

UK tests lunar technology

Space policy hits its stride

The hope will be that the new agreement signed in Washington on Thursday will lead to many more such collaborations.

"The agreement comes at a very good time," commented Dr Andrew Coates, a leading planetary scientist at University College London and a co-investigator on the current Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn.

"We're just in the process of planning the next great phase of missions. This is particularly true in Europe where we are busy writing proposals at the moment for missions that would run from 2015 to 2025.

"We would hope from this agreement that we would get to fly more instruments on more US missions - to the Moon, to Mars and beyond; as well as working with our usual partners within the European Space Agency," he told BBC News.

Moon network

The agreement was signed by Nasa Administrator Dr Mike Griffin and Sir Keith O'Nions, director-general of Science and Innovation at the Department of Trade and Industry.

The document talks of the mutual desire for detailed discussions on specific areas of potential collaboration involving lunar science and explorations.

"These cooperative efforts may range from the exchange of information related to research and development to actual contributions for particular missions," it reads.

BNSC receives most of its funding from the new Science and Technology Facilities Council.

The council's chief executive officer, Professor Keith Mason, said: "Nasa is committed to a long-term lunar exploration programme leading to a scientific research outpost, likely near the lunar South Pole, by 2020.

"In advance of this, permanent robotic communications and navigation infrastructure will need to be installed in lunar orbit in parallel with scientific reconnaissance of the surface. And this is where UK industry and academia could play a vital part.

"We have unique expertise in small satellites and miniaturised instruments which could provide a low-cost lunar telecoms capability, whilst simultaneously deploying probes to the Moon's surface in order to characterise the surface and interior."

Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6575627.stm
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A British-made rover nicknamed Bridget is on target for a 2013 launch to Mars.

Confirmation of the European Space Agency's support for the UK team behind the golf-cart sized craft came with a contract worth £2.56 million.

The award, made to the Stevenage-based British arm of the European space manufacturing company EADS Astrium, will pay for the next stage of the rover's development. Bridget will be part of Europe's ExoMars mission.

The rover will be dropped on to the planet from an orbiting mothership. It is designed to drill into rocks and carry instruments that can look for signs of past or present life.

Bridget has already been put through its paces on a volcanic desert on the Spanish island of Tenerife, chosen because it resembles the surface of Mars.

On Mars the rover will have to navigate itself across inhospitable terrain strewn with rocks and sand dunes.

Dr Mike Healy, director of Earth observation, navigation and science at Astrium UK, said: "We welcome the reaffirmation of the UK's support ... for the ExoMars mission and the commitment of Europe to return to Mars. The latest decision now enables a clear focus for the development of the project up to its planned launch in 2013. We have a mission that promises to deliver world-class science, provided through its suite of cutting-edge analytical instruments."

Bridget will give British scientists a second chance after the Beagle 2 disaster of 2003. The British-made lander, part of the European Mars Express mission, vanished on Christmas Day as it prepared to descend to the planet's surface. Like the new rover, it had been equipped to search for signs of life.

Bridget will follow up the work conducted by the American space agency Nasa's rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, which have gathered geological data and looked for evidence of water on Mars. The European machine will take samples from beneath the Martian surface and analyse them for fossilised microbes and chemical biomarkers of life.

British scientists and engineers have also received new investment of almost £2 million from the Science and Technology Facilities Research Council (STFC) for ongoing research and technology development dedicated to ExoMars.

Link:

http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/science_technology/new+mars+rover+set+for+2013+launch/558302

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  • 5 months later...

La premiere satellite du DMC, construit par SSTL pour l'Algerie, etait en l'orbit pour cinq ans maintenant. Aujourd'hui il y a cinq satellites de DMC en l'orbit et SSTL construit troi nouveaux satellites.

Five years in orbit for first DMC satellite AlSAT-1

28th November 2007

Today, Algeria celebrates the 5th anniversary of its first satellite, AlSAT-1 which marked the beginning of the country’s national space programme. Five years on, the African nation not only benefits from improved cartography, pollution monitoring and petrology information, but also makes a significant contribution to international disaster response.

AlSAT-1 was launched on 28th November 2002 following the creation of the Algerian Space Agency (ASAL) by presidential decree on the 16th January 2002. British company SSTL built AlSAT-1 and provided training for engineers from the Centre National des Techniques Spatiales (CNTS) as part of a development and training programme that helped the country take its first steps into space.

AlSAT-1 was the first satellite in the 5-satellite Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC). Under the coordination of SSTL’s subsidiary, DMCii Ltd, DMC satellite owners share image data and the infrastructure required to operate their satellite.

In just 5 years, Algeria has developed a national space programme that takes full advantage of their satellite and DMC partnership for the benefit of the Algerian people. CNTS distributes satellite image data to Algerian institutions for cartography, pollution monitoring and petrology applications. This summer, AlSAT-1 was used to assess the damage of devastating forest fires in areas such as Djebel Belezma and Beni Fedhla, supplemented with additional data from the DMC.

AlSAT-1 also makes a valuable contribution to the DMC and assists international disaster response through the International Charter: Space and Major Disasters. Dr Azzedine Oussedik, Director General, Algerian Space Agency, explained: “We are proud of our national space programme and of our role in establishing the DMC. As a member of the DMC Consortium, we are effectively extending the reach of our capability by sharing the significant space asset that a constellation affords – a benefit enjoyed by all the DMC partners... We also earn a financial return on our investment by supplying images to DMCii for commercial purposes such as precision agriculture.”

AlSAT-1 was built with a 5 year design life but is expected to continue operations for the foreseeable future. Like the other satellites in the DMC, AlSAT-1 was built by SSTL with a 32m optical imaging payload capable of imaging areas as large as 640 x 560km very rapidly. The next generation of DMC satellites currently under manufacture at SSTL, namely NigeriaSat-2 (Nigeria), UK-DMC2 (UK) and Deimos-1 (Spain) will offer increased resolution for more detailed Earth observation.

Algeria is keen to further develop its own space industry with particular interest in Earth observation and telecommunications and in 2006, the UK Minister for Science and Technology, on behalf of the British National Space Centre, signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Algerian Space Agency (ASAL).

SSTL va developer une "orbiter" pour une mission de lune.

 

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SSTL to develop low cost lunar orbiter for NASA

13 August 2007

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has been awarded a contract for the study phase of a potential joint US-UK lunar orbiter mission to be called Magnolia.

This first phase of the contract will run for 9-months, culminating in a preliminary mission design. The contract includes a package of training by SSTL and the University of Surrey that will allow Mississippi State University (MSU) and NASA Stennis Space Center staff to benefit from the know-how accrued by SSTL over the last 25 years, across 27 small satellite missions.

Commenting on the contract award, MSU’s David Shaw stated: “MSU is committed to developing a small satellite capability in Mississippi and believes that SSTL is the best partner with whom to achieve that aim”. SSTL’s founder and Group Executive Chairman, Sir Martin Sweeting, added: “We are delighted to be working with our US partners on this programme and look forward to the exciting possibility of a joint US-UK lunar mission. SSTL is committed to driving down the cost of space missions in Earth orbit and beyond.”

In 2006, SSTL performed a lunar exploration design study for the UK government’s Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (the newly created Science & Technology Facilities Council). The study was supported by a group of UK scientists and showed the feasibility of a pair of low cost missions known as MoonLITE and MoonRaker.

SSTL has already developed equipment for interplanetary missions such as the Rosetta comet chaser and recently delivered a payload processor for a US radar to fly onboard the 2008 Indian lunar mission, Chandrayaan-1. Looking deeper into space, SSTL has performed a European Space Agency feasibility study for a low cost mission to Venus and has studied potential missions to near-Earth asteroids and Earth re-entry for the future return of samples from Mars. Magnolia marks SSTL’s next step beyond low Earth Orbit.

The next phase of the Magnolia mission is planned to start in 2008 and could lead to the launch of the mission in 2010.

The contract, between MSU and SSTL follows the signing of a Joint Statement of Intent between NASA and the UK’s BNSC in April this year.

www.sstl.co.uk

Astrium a gagne une contrat de l'entreprise Inmarsat pour un grand satellite. La contrat est value a 500 million euro. Le satellite va dessiner par Astrium UK.

Development agencies £36 million cash boost launches European space project...

(27th November 2007)

A €500 million European space satellite programme that will improve communications for people across the globe was today awarded to the United Kingdom’s Inmarsat plc by the European Space Agency (ESA).

Essential funding of £36 million from the three Greater South East Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) meant that Inmarsat’s proposal for the most technically advanced civilian satellite in the world was given the green light by the member states of ESA.

Inmarsat’s proposal means that the Alphabus satellite will have its payload developed and built in the UK by EADS Astrium. Crucial to this win was financial support for the public/private finance bid from the East of England Development Agency (EEDA), London Development Agency (LDA) and South East England Development Agency (SEEDA). The UK funding will be matched at a ratio of around 1:10 with investment from the European Space Agency (made up of European and Canadian publicly funded Space organisations).

The programme will specifically bring a number of benefits to the East of England economy. The Inmarsat XL satellite will be designed at Astrium’s Stevenage site, securing more than 125 high skilled jobs in the region for the first three years of the programme. Consequently, about €60 million of funds from the programme will be channelled through the Astrium site in Stevenage, which will have a positive impact on the local and regional economy.

Wider benefits include improved communications for the whole region as the additional coverage provided by the new satellite will enable even the most remote and disadvantaged parts of the East of England to communicate more effectively.

EEDA chief executive, David Marlow, said: "This announcement is particularly exciting news for the East of England, the UK's ideas region. It not only demonstrates how the regional development agencies of the Greater South East (GSE) can work together to make a real difference for UK plc, but also strengthens our position as a leading edge, world-class technology and innovation region.

“In the East of England about €60 million of programme funds will be channelled through Astrium’s headquarters at Stevenage, helping to secure more than 125 high skilled jobs and generate many more over the next few years. It will also give Astrium the competitive edge for future satellite programmes.”

The satellite:

The new satellite, Alphasat I-XL will be the most technically advanced satellite in the world for civilian applications. It will have a next generation digital processor and solar array drive mechanism developed by Astrium UK with support from the British National Space Centre (BNSC) which co-ordinates the UK’s civil space programme. The satellite will support a new generation of mobile technologies and enable communications across Europe and Africa – creating new business opportunities for UK companies.

The I-XL will enable:

• robust communications in crisis and disaster emergencies.

• telecommunications connection of houses, schools and businesses in remote locations, via Inmarsat BGAN portable data terminals.

• governments to connect with dispersed populations

• essential voice and data communications for a wide range of industry sectors such as media, maritime, oil and gas.

Benefits for the UK:

Securing the project will bring significant economic and social benefits to the UK and retain over 500 high technology jobs within the Greater South East region during the development and operation of the satellite. It will further maintain and develop a high level of skilled labour in the region and generate revenues for London-based Inmarsat, through subscriptions to satellite services. The projected flow of revenue into the region as a result of this win is £250 million.

The project will also ensure the UK Space Industry maintains its competitive edge and sustains and grows its current global market share by placing the country at the forefront of new mobile technology and communications.

The bid:

Bidding was managed by the European Space Agency (ESA), which awarded the contract to Inmarsat over the competing French company Eutelsat. ESA regulations required a public contribution to the project. SEEDA, EEDA and LDA are each investing £12 million in the project over three years.

“Inmarsat thanks Government Ministers and the Regional Development Agencies for their support in winning the Alphasat opportunity for the United Kingdom,” said Andrew Sukawaty, Chairman and CEO of Inmarsat. “Without their timely action this significant European project, with its high tech jobs and leading technology, would have been lost to the country. We look forward to bringing Alphasat I-XL to completion and to increase the communications and safety services we can offer to Europe and beyond.”

SEEDA chairman, Jim Brathwaite CBE said: “The Alphasat project is a great coup for the Greater South East, building upon the region’s growth in the UK and making our country a bigger player within the global space industry. Most importantly, however, is that the successful bid puts the region at a distinct advantage against new rising economic powers.

“This collaboration between the three RDAs of the Greater South East shows just how effective we can be in generating investment, business jobs and success for UK plc. I am confident that this will be the first of many such ventures.”

LDA chief executive Manny Lewis said: “This decision is good news for London. The London Development Agency has backed this project as it will help place London and the UK at the forefront of the communications technology space race. It will safeguard jobs and provide over £600m of inward investment for a London-based company.”

The BNSC, through €8.67 million of UK investment in the European Space Agency’s ARTES programme funded Astrium UK to carry out the development work on the next generation digital processor and Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) and early stage conceptual studies. This enabled Inmarsat to bid and successfully win the Alphasat contract which has been announced today.

Link.

http://www.hertfordshire.com/pages/news/show-news.asp?id=780

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Vive l'ESA.

Franchement on se donne pas les moyens pour reussir.

C'est quand qu'on monte notre programme pour la lune comme ca bientôt on aurat 27 programmes differents c'est cool l'europe non ?

Je prefere rien dire sur la colaboration R-U/Nasa, je connais pas assez le sujet mais sa sent trop le "déjà vu".

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Le gouvernement va presenter leur nouveaux "Space Strategy 2007-2010" en les prochaines mois.

Ici un petit presentation de l'industrie britannique d'espace.

Entreprises avec un presence au Royaume-Uni en le secteur d'espace.

  • BNSC (British National Space Council)
- l'organisation principal pour le Royaume-Uni en ESA etc...

  • Astrium - plus de 2200 personnes
- a develope et produit les Skynet 5 satellites pour le MoD

- va developer en cooperation les satellites du Galileo et va produire les premiers 4

- developer et produire des radars d'espace

- developer et produire les "payloads" pour presque tout satellites d'Astrium

- partnaire principal pour des projets d'ESA comme "Lisa Pathfinder", "Aeolus", "Alphasat", "Beagle 2", "Bridget", etc...

  • SSTL (Surrey Satellite Technology Limited) - environ 230 personnes
- a develope et produit le GIOVE-A pour Galileo, produit aussi le GIOVE-A1 pour Galileo

- "leader" en petit et micro satellites

- developer, produire et operer le "Disaster Monitoring Constellation" avec 5 satellites et 3 sous construction

- a develope et produit le Topsat "spy satellite" pour le MoD

  • Inmarsat plc
- operation en moment 10 satellites

- donner des services de communication etc... avec ces satellites

  • Starchaser
- developement et construction des, en moment, petits lanceurs

- developement de plus grand lanceurs en les prochaines annees

  • Virgin Galactic
- operation des vols d'espace

Les a mon avis 10 projets le plus important pour le Royaume-Uni et le part principal que le Royaume-Uni fait.

1. Galileo - construction de quelques satellites civil

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2. Skynet 5 - construction des satellites militaire

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3. Disaster Monitoring Constellation - construction et operation des satellites civil

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4. Alphabus - nouvel satellite d'Astrium - construction du satellite

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5. Beagle 2 et Bridget - construction des vehicles d'espace

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6. Lisa Pathfinder - construction du vehicle

7. "Magnolia" - SSTL moon missions - en development - peut-etre une mission a la lune

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8. Possible retourne aux lanceurs - developement et construction - photo d'un lanceur du Starchaser

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9. "MoonTwins" - Astrium UK moon missions - peut-etre une mission a la lune

10. Virgin Galactic - vols d'espace - opportunite pour astronauts britanniques

Links.

http://www.bnsc.gov.uk/assets//channels/resources/publications/pdfs/BNSC%20SpaceActivities_2007.pdf

http://www.eads.com/800/en/eads_uk/What/EADS_Astrium.html

http://www.sstl.co.uk/index.php?loc=21

http://www.inmarsat.com/About/?language=EN&textonly=False

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A noter que l'UK ne fabriquera que la charge utilise du satellite, pas le satellite en entier, qui est d'ailleurs est une Plateforme Française ou italienne, pareil pour Skynet.

Et pour le retour aux lanceurs, il faudrait déjà que le Royaume-Uni dispose d'un passé dans ce domaine ce qui n'est pas le cas. Sans compter le budget trop faible du RU dans ce domaine pour avoir des prétentions suffisantes. Actuellement la plupart de emplois sont en grande partie du aux entreprises européenne et aux pays leader européen dans ce domaine ( France,Italie,Allemagne).

C'est d'ailleurs le Gouvernement Anglais qui a essayer de limiter le plus possible le programme Galileo, pour eviter de poser des problèmes aux USA...

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A noter que l'UK ne fabriquera que la charge utilise du satellite, pas le satellite en entier, qui est d'ailleurs est une Plateforme Française ou italienne, pareil pour Skynet.

Peut-etre tu peut poster des informations et liens, mes informations disent une choose totallement different. 

Astrium UK develope et produit la "structure and subsystems" pour tous "Eurostar communications satellites." Ca n'est pas le satellite entier, mais pour l'Eurostar le Royaume-Uni develope et produit le plateforme, pas le charge. La meme est vrai pour Inmarsat 4 par exemple.

Skynet 4 etait deja tout britannique. Skynet 5 etait produit par des travailleurs britanniques quand mes informations sont correct.

SSTL develope et produire des satellites en entier aussi.

Links.

http://www.astrium.eads.net/company/Locations/stevenage

Et pour le retour aux lanceurs, il faudrait déjà que le Royaume-Uni dispose d'un passé dans ce domaine ce qui n'est pas le cas.

Encore une fois, faux, c'est si j'ai compri vraiment.  ;) Le Royaume-Uni a deja fait un lanceur. Le Black Arrow. Il est vrai que le Royaume-Uni n'a pas beaucoup de capabilites dans ce secteur, mais Starchaser Industries sont une entreprise innovative et ils ont un lanceur qui peux probablement voler les 130 kms qui sont officiel "espace". Un premier tir est vu pour 2008 je pense.

Sans compter le budget trop faible du RU dans ce domaine pour avoir des prétentions suffisantes. Actuellement la plupart de emplois sont en grande partie du aux entreprises européenne et aux pays leader européen dans ce domaine ( France,Italie,Allemagne).

Il est vrai que le gouvernement ne paye pas assez (a mon avis), mais le gouvernement n'est pas la seule source. Mais on besoin dire aussi que l'argent est la pour des satellites (et pas pour des satellites et lanceurs) et c'est la raison pourquoi l'industrie est forte en le secteur des satellites. Mais en tout cas, l'industrie d'espace britannique est plus grand que l'industrie italien.

Turnover britannique: 725 million de livres, ce sont environ 1073 millions d'euros (sans services/downstream)

Turnover italien: 980 millions d'euros (sans services/downstream)

Il est important de dire que l'industrie britannique avec "downstream" est encore une fois plus plus grand que l'industrie italien. Une raison sont des entreprises comme Inmarsat qui fait l'operation des beaucoups de satellites.

Links.

UK space industry

Italian space industry

C'est d'ailleurs le Gouvernement Anglais qui a essayer de limiter le plus possible le programme Galileo, pour eviter de poser des problèmes aux USA...

Le Royaume-Uni voulait un process qui donne le meilleur le travail pour faire des "savings" et pas le system communist qui est normal en ESA.

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Peut-etre tu peut poster des informations et liens, mes informations disent une choose totallement different. 

La Plateforme Alphabus a était réalisé par la France et l'Italie, c'est une plateforme de satellite. Aprèes tu peux y mettre ce que tu souhaite dessus, avec différents niveau de puissance. Je n'ai pas ma doc sous la main, mais Skynet est également basé sur une plateforme Italienne ou Francaise (ou les deux), car ce sont les deux seul pays ( il me semble ) a avoir investit lourdement sur les plateforme satellites de grosse puissance. Aprèes rien n'empeche d'assembler tout ça au ROyaume-Uni vue que la ligne de fabrication anglaise et faite pour ça.

Encore une fois, faux, c'est si j'ai compri vraiment.  Wink Le Royaume-Uni a deja fait un lanceur. Le Black Arrow.

Avec seulement 4 lancement dont 3 echec et un satellite mis en orbite. Le tout en 1965. Bref ce n'est pas une expérience significative.

Il est vrai que le Royaume-Uni n'a pas beaucoup de capabilites dans ce secteur

Indirectement vous l'avez avec Ariane mais c'est vrai qu'un plus grand investissement du RU serait bénéfique pour tout le monde en Europe.

mais Starchaser Industries sont une entreprise innovative et ils ont un lanceur qui peux probablement voler les 130 kms qui sont officiel "espace". Un premier tir est vu pour 2008 je pense.

Ca ne s'appel pas un lanceur. Tu ne peux rien envoyer dans l'espace. Pour ça il faut atteindre au minimum 400km et la c'est beaucoup plus difficille.

Il est important de dire que l'industrie britannique avec "downstream" est encore une fois plus plus grand que l'industrie italien. Une raison sont des entreprises comme Inmarsat qui fait l'operation des beaucoups de satellites.

Mais l'industrie italienne est capable de developper des lanceurs et sattelites de façon autonome. Elle est d'ailleurs leader du programme Vega. C'est au final ce qui me parait le plus important.

Le Royaume-Uni voulait un process qui donne le meilleur le travail pour faire des "savings" et pas le system communist qui est normal en ESA.

En refusant l'utilisation militaire de Galileo ?
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La Plateforme Alphabus a était réalisé par la France et l'Italie, c'est une plateforme de satellite. Aprèes tu peux y mettre ce que tu souhaite dessus, avec différents niveau de puissance. Je n'ai pas ma doc sous la main, mais Skynet est également basé sur une plateforme Italienne ou Francaise (ou les deux), car ce sont les deux seul pays ( il me semble ) a avoir investit lourdement sur les plateforme satellites de grosse puissance. Aprèes rien n'empeche d'assembler tout ça au ROyaume-Uni vue que la ligne de fabrication anglaise et faite pour ça.

Encore une fois, il est faux que le Royaume-Uni n'a pas develope des grands platformes de satellites. J'ai deja poste que le Skynet 5 est basee sur le Eurostar 3000, ou Astrium UK fait "the structure and subsystems", c'est le plateforme, le Skynet 5 est produit en la majorite (probablement tout, mais je n'ai pas un lien pour ca) en le Royaume-Uni. Parce que les six Skynet 4s etaient produit deja totallement en le Royaume-Uni il est probable que tout etait produit en le Royaume-Uni aussi pour le Skynet 5, mais en tout cas le plateforme prinicipal et la charge utile.

structure and subsystem design and build for all Eurostar communications satellites

Link.

http://www.astrium.eads.net/company/Locations/stevenage

Avec seulement 4 lancement dont 3 echec et un satellite mis en orbite. Le tout en 1965. Bref ce n'est pas une expérience significative.

Et? Ou j'ai dit une autre choose? Mais Starchase est la, et a mon avis il est une choose important. Et Black Arrow etait en 1971.

Ca ne s'appel pas un lanceur. Tu ne peux rien envoyer dans l'espace. Pour ça il faut atteindre au minimum 400km et la c'est beaucoup plus difficille.

L'espace est 100+ kms. C'est la definition du X-Prize.

Mais l'industrie italienne est capable de developper deslanceurs et sattelites de façon autonome. Elle est d'ailleurs leader du programme Vega. C'est au final ce qui me parait le plus important.

C'est drole, l'Italie n'a pas developper le Vega tout en seul. Je pense qu'il est tres dommage qu'il me semble que tu ne lit pas mes posts. Tu n'as pas lit quoi j'ai dit sur SSTL, tu n'as pas lit quoi j'ai poste sur Astrium UK. Dommage.

SSTL - "world leader" en nano, mini et micro sattelites

Bespoke 4 lancee

Minisat - 400 -> 400kgs, 1 lancee

Microsat - 100 -> 130kgs, 4 lancee

Microsat - 70 ->70kgs , 15 lancee

SNAP -> 12kgs, 1 lancee

2 autres "microsats" lancee aussi.

Des sattelites sous contrats qui ne sont pas lancee en moment: Environ 12 sattelites en moment.

Deimos-1 pour l'Espagne

NigeriaSat-2 pour le Nigeria

NX pour le Nigeria

Cinq RapidEye pour le Canada

UKDMC-2 pour le Royaume-Uni

GMP pour l'ESA et le BNSC

Giove-A2 pour l'Europe

VNIIEM pour la Russie

Links.

http://zenit.sstl.co.uk/index.php?loc=5

http://zenit.sstl.co.uk/documents/SSU7.pdf

http://zenit.sstl.co.uk/documents/SN6WEB_SSTL.pdf

Astrium UK - pas seulement la charge utile mais ils pouvent faire aussi des plateforms

Inmarsat 4 sattelites

The giant communications satellites such as Inmarsat-4 designed and built in the UK.

Envisat et Polarplatform

The prime contractor for development of the Polar Platform is Matra Marconi Space (more precisely, the company's establishment at Bristol, formerly British Aerospace Space Systems), and the value of the contract is 502 million ECU (1988 prices), corresponding to about 675 million ECU at today's prices.

Aeolus

The UK will lead the development of the world's first ever satellite to study the Earth's wind patterns from space. The European Space Agency (ESA) today awarded the prime contract to EADS Astrium (UK), to build the Aeolus satellite.

Eurostar 3000

Eutelsat W3A ist der erste Satellit auf Basis der Eurostar E3000-Plattform. Seine Nutzlast und mechanische Struktur stammen aus Großbritannien, die Elektronik aus Frankreich, seine Sonnensegel kommen aus Deutschland und einige seiner Antennen

aus Spanien.

Eurostar workshare:

UK - Satellite platform ("mechanische Struktur") and payload ("Nutzlast")

France - Electronics ("Elektronik")

Germany - solar panels ("Sonnensegel")

Spain - some antennas ("einige Antennen")

Eurostar 3000: Masse de environ 5000kgs

Eurostar 2000: Masse de environ 2000kgs

Eurostar 1000: Masse de environ 1400kgs

Links.

http://www.bnsc.gov.uk/assets//channels/resources/publications/pdfs/BNSC%20SpaceActivities_2007.pdf

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/Pr_15_1995_i_EN.html

http://www.planet-aerospace.com/pas/content/OF00000200000056/2/34/200005342.pdf

En sattelites le Royaume-Uni est tres forts, et a mon avis plus forts que l'Italie et au meme niveau comme la France ou l'Allemagne.

En des "scientific missions" et "landers" comme LISA Pathfinder, Beagle 2, Bridget etc... le Royaume-Uni est tres fort.

En lanceurs le Royaume-Uni est faible, c'est aussi claire.

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La platforme E3000 pour satellite lourd a été développée par Matra-Marconi Space (aujourd'hui EADS Astrium) qui contenait des entreprises britanique (Marconi space et British Aerospace).

L'espace est 100+ kms. C'est la definition du X-Prize.

C'est effectivement la délimitation de l'espace d'après la Fédération aéronautique internationnale mais ça ne permet pas de mettre sur orbite un satellite. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_space#Milestones_on_the_way_to_space
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C'est effectivement la délimitation de l'espace d'après la Fédération aéronautique internationnale mais ça ne permet pas de mettre sur orbite un satellite.

Oui, bien sur, mais j'ai parle d'un lanceur du Starchaser Industries qui est pour des personnes en le X-Prize et qu'ils vont developer pour des personnes. Je suis desolee quand j'ai fait l'impression que cette lanceur est pour des sattelites en moment.

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Oui, bien sur, mais j'ai parle d'un lanceur du Starchaser Industries qui est pour des personnes en le X-Prize et qu'ils vont developer pour des personnes. Je suis desolee quand j'ai fait l'impression que cette lanceur est pour des sattelites en moment.

Ce que j'essaye de t'expliquer, c'est qu'a 100km d'altitude il n'y a pas de difficultés particulière a envoyer une fusée. Les contraintes sont très faibles. C'est pour ca que ce genre de fusée n'a aucun interet particulier au niveau technique. L'interet c'est atteindre au minimum 400km pour pouvoir mettre en orbite des satellites, ou envoyer des des gens en orbite. Et c'est a cette altitude qu'il y a de grosse difficultés, qui nécessitent des investissement et des connaissances lourdes. De ce coté seul l'Italie, la France et l'Allemagne ont de les connaissances nécessaires que n'a pas le Royaume-Uni.

C'est drole, l'Italie n'a pas developper le Vega tout en seul. Je pense qu'il est tres dommage qu'il me semble que tu ne lit pas mes posts. Tu n'as pas lit quoi j'ai dit sur SSTL, tu n'as pas lit quoi j'ai poste sur Astrium UK. Dommage.

Elle ne l'a pas développe toute seule mais est maître d'oeuvre du lanceur et dispose de la totalité des connaissances techniques pour le développer seul. L'italie s'investit énormément en R&D et dans tout les programme hautement technologique. Elle travaille énormement sur les projet de lanceurs réutilisable, sur la propulsion spatiale. Bref si elle n'atteint pas les budget Allemands et Français elle fait partie des 3 Pays qui forme le noyaux dur pour les futur developpement de lanceurs en Europe.

En sattelites le Royaume-Uni est tres forts, et a mon avis plus forts que l'Italie et au meme niveau comme la France ou l'Allemagne.

Le leader mondiale au niveau satellite en 2006 c'est Thales Alenia Space qui est franco/italien. Avec pour 2006 8 satelites GEO vendu, et 48 satellites Globalstar.

Arrive ensuite Eads Astrium, franco-allemand avec 7 sattelites commerciaux + 2 sattelites de l'ESA.

Bref la France est clairement leader Européen, suivi par l'allemagne l'italie, et au final le RU.

Le budget spatiale italien est environ le double (800 millions € ) du budget spatial du RU ( 550m€). Je ne parle même pas de la France et de l'Allemagne.

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Le leader mondiale au niveau satellite en 2006 c'est Thales Alenia Space qui est franco/italien. Avec pour 2006 8 satelites GEO vendu, et 48 satellites Globalstar.

Le contrat du Globalstar etait une grande contrat, peut-etre tu peut choisit une annee moins selectif. :lol: Par sattelite Globalstar le cout est seulement 14 million euros.

Arrive ensuite Eads Astrium, franco-allemand avec 7 sattelites commerciaux + 2 sattelites de l'ESA.

Presque tous sattelites d'Astrium ont un grand part britannique. Thales Alenia Space a moins des personnes en l'Italie que Astrium en le Royaume-Uni. Thales Alenia Space a environ 2300 personnes en l'Italie et Astrium UK a environ 2500 personnes en le Royaume-Uni. Et il y a aussi SSTL en le Royaume-Uni avec 230 personnes. Il me semble que des entreprises pour la contruction des sattelites ont plus des personnes en le Royaume-Uni  (2730 en moment) que en l'Italie avec 2300.

Links.

http://www.scitech.ac.uk/PMC/PRel/STFC/Mars2Earth.aspx?pf=1

http://www.thalesonline.com/space/About-us/Article-Detail.html?link=6c397233-4a2d-1842-2230-5c5c381b7434:central&locale=EN-gb&Title=Italian+component+of+Thales+Alenia+Space&dis=1

Le budget spatiale italien est environ le double (800 millions € ) du budget spatial du RU ( 550m€). Je ne parle même pas de la France et de l'Allemagne.

Encore une fois, l'industrie britannique spatiale est plus grand que l'industrie italien et j'ai deja  poste un lien pour preuve ca.

Des nouvelles, NASA a donne leur "support" au mission a la lune "MoonLite" du SSTL.

Link.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7143197.stm

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  • 3 weeks later...

Star Trek-style ion engine to fuel Mercury craft

By Nic Fleming, Science Correspondent

Last Updated: 3:01pm GMT 18/01/2008

British scientists have been given the go ahead to begin creating the most fuel efficient engine ever to leave the ground for a spaceship bound for Mercury.

Image IPB

BepiColumbo will follow in the footsteps of Nasa's recent Messenger mission to Mercury

The Star Trek-style ion engine powering the BepiColumbo spacecraft on its six-year journey to the solar system's innermost planet will achieve the equivalent of 17.8 million miles to the gallon.

Representatives of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Astrium, Europe's largest space company, have signed a contract which gives the £500 million mission the green light to launch in 2013.

Mercury, which can reach temperatures of up to 878F (470C) on its surface, has puzzled planetary scientists for a long time because it is very dense despite its position as the closest planet to the sun.

BepiColumbo will consist of two spacecraft which will separate as they approach their destination.

ESA's Mercury planetary orbiter will investigate the planet's surface and internal composition, while a Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency oribiter will study its magnetic field.

Uncovering Mercury's secrets will provide fundamental clues to understanding the history and formation of all of the inner planets including Earth.

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Prof Keith Mason, chief executive of the Science and Technology Facilities Council, said "BepiColombo will make the most detailed study of Mercury ever, revealing the secrets of the planet closest to the Sun - what it is formed of, how the Sun affects it and what we can learn about the other planets by comparison.

"A mission of this complexity reveals the ingenuity of our scientists and engineers."

Dr Ralph Cordey, Head of Science and Exploration at Astrium UK, said: "Mercury is an anomalous planet.

"Previous observations have raised more questions than they have answered. It has about the same density as the Earth, which confuses scientists because they would expect it to be lighter."

BepiColumbo will travel 4.3 billion miles and use the gravity of the Moon, Earth, Venus and Mercury itself to steer its path to the planet.

The large amount of energy required to break against the Sun's gravity will be provided primarily by the ion propulsion engine.

This will produce a continuous stream of charged atoms with a thrust equivalent to force produced by the weight of a third of a kiwi fruit on Earth.

Because the ions are being steadily released over a long period, the force will allow the spacecrafts to slow down enough to enter orbit around the planet safely in 2019.

Scientists and engineers with Astrium in the UK will be responsible for the structure of the spacecraft and the chemical and ion propulsion systems.

Dr Howard Gray, electro-propulsion expert at Astrium, said: "Ion propulsion will be a key technology for a series of future long distance exploration missions.

"Today's agreement puts British scientists and engineers in a strong position in Europe to take a lead role in adopting these systems for future spacecraft."

Link.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/earth/2008/01/18/scimerc118.xml

Astrium and ESA sign contract for Mercury probe

EADS Astrium

January 18, 2008

Astrium and ESA sign contract for Mercury probe © EADS Astrium

    * BepiColombo to head for the innermost planet in 2013

    * Extreme temperatures – a challenge for the engineers

    * Astrium continues its successful series of planetary probes

Friedrichshafen, 18 January 2008 – Astrium is set to build the Mercury probe BepiColombo on behalf of the European Space Agency, ESA. In Friedrichshafen today, representatives of ESA and of Astrium, Europe’s largest space company, signed the main industrial contract for the mission to the innermost planet of the solar system. The contract is worth 350.9 million euros. BepiColombo is scheduled to begin its journey to Mercury in 2013, and is considered to be the most sophisticated scientific mission in the history of European space exploration to date.

BepiColombo will consist of three modules: a European orbiter, a Japanese orbiter and a transfer module carrying the two spacecraft to Mercury. The complete unit will have a height of approximately five metres and a mass of about three tonnes, of which about 50% is propellant.

The European “Mercury Planetary Orbiter” (MPO) will be equipped with eleven scientific instruments. Flying in a polar orbit, it will study Mercury for at least a year, imaging the planet’s surface, generating height profiles, and collecting data on Mercury’s composition and atmosphere. The Japanese “Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter” (MMO) will investigate the planet’s magnetic field with its five on-board instruments.

Astrium in Germany leads an industrial team whose core members include Astrium Ltd in the UK and Thales Alenia Space in Italy. Astrium in Friedrichshafen is responsible for the entire “three-section” spacecraft, Including attitude and orbit control design and development. The integration of the engineering model of BepiColombo will take place in Friedrichshafen. Astrium in the UK is responsible for the structure of the entire spacecraft including the launch vehicle adapter, the complex mission analysis that will require numerous swing-bys of the Earth, the moon, and Venus in its six year flight plan, and also the two chemical propulsion systems and the ion propulsion system. Astrium in France will develop the on-board software, building on experience gained from the Rosetta, Mars Express and Venus Express probes which are already in space.

One of the greatest challenges facing Astrium engineers is that of preparing BepiColombo for the extreme temperatures it will encounter – close to Mercury, solar radiation is up to ten times stronger than on Earth, with temperatures of up to 470 degrees Celsius on the planet’s surface.

Experts at Astrium will use a variety of techniques to protect the electronics and scientific instruments from the extreme heat including a newly designed insulating blanket made of a combination of glass fibre, titanium film and ceramic fibres, and a radiator to release the heat from the probe’s interior into space. In addition, the spacecraft will use special solar arrays capable of supplying power even when temperatures reach 250 degrees Celsius.

The combination of a conventional chemical propulsion system with an innovative ion propulsion system will provide the required thrust on BepiColombo’s long journey. Several swing-by manoeuvres are planned in order to propel the probe out of Earth’s orbit and into its planned trajectory. During these manoeuvres, BepiColombo will be accelerated using the gravity fields of the Moon, then decelerated by Earth and Venus. After two further swing-by manoeuvres at Mercury, BepiColombo will reach its destination in 2019 and enter into a polar orbit.

Scheduled to explore Mercury for at least 12 months, the spacecraft’s mission may be extended by a further year. To date, planetary researchers know very little about the hottest planet in our solar system.

Astrium, a wholly owned subsidiary of EADS, is dedicated to providing civil and defence space systems and services. In 2006, Astrium had a turnover of €3.2 billion and 12,000 employees in France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Spain and the Netherlands. Its three main areas of activity are Astrium Space Transportation for launchers and orbital infrastructure, and Astrium Satellites for spacecraft and ground segment, and its wholly owned subsidiary Astrium Services for the development and delivery of satellite services.

EADS is a global leader in aerospace, defence and related services. In 2006, EADS generated revenues of €39.4 billion and employed a workforce of more than 116000.

Link.

http://www.astrium.eads.net/press-center/press-releases/astrium-and-esa-sign-contract-for-mercury-probe

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