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Quelle perte de temps cette article  :lol:

Le Maroc s'est doté récemment d'au moins 3 IAI Heron  

d'autres sources a ce sujet? moi j'ai eu vent sur les dansseures oriental  israelien pour entrainer les marocaines au fistival de marakech , mais toujours rien sur le Heron...

tiens , selon le journaliste " expert" des Armat sur le F5 moderniser  :O , ils sont   toujours en productions?

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Quelle perte de temps cette article  :lol:

d'autres sources a ce sujet? moi j'ai eu vent sur les dansseures oriental  israelien pour entrainer les marocaines au fistival de marakech , mais toujours rien sur le Heron...

tiens , selon le journaliste " expert" des Armat sur le F5 moderniser  :O , ils sont  toujours en productions?

Ben le deal on en parlait deja en 2007 , avec la collaboration Dassault/IAI ...

07/06/2007

Maghreb Confidentiel N°790

MAROC

Dassault aviation dans les drones avant les Rafale

Serge Dassault multiplie sa présence au Maroc pour décrocher son premier contrat de vente de quinze Rafale dans le royaume, sur financement saoudien

Serge Dassault veut continuer sur sa lancée. Il est très actif dans le royaume chérifien. Il a ainsi récemment "doublé" EADS sur le contrat de ventes de drones stratégiques avec l'israélien Israeli Aerospace Industries (IAI).

Au Maroc, ce dernier était jusqu'à présent l'allié d'EADS dans ce secteur sensible. Le contrat est de l'ordre de 50 millions d'euros. Juste une mise en bouche pour Dassault aviation

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Avec vous les Ch-47D commandés en 2009 ?

Non pas encore , mais sa ne saurait tardé , puisque en 2012 , les cours de formation ont commencé pour 4 pilotes et 3 mécanos . Je pense que pour le prochain Aero Expo a Marrakech , ils seront présenté au public .

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Marine, Moroccan and German military intelligence professionals conduct workshop for African Lion 13

By Sgt. Tatum Vayavananda | Marine Corps Forces Africa | May 02, 2013

AGADIR, Morocco --

U.S. Marine, Moroccan and German intelligence officers strengthened proficiency and interoperability with an Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop during Exercise African Lion 13, April 11-14.

“We are doing this workshop to work with the interoperability and intelligence portion and prepare for the Command Post Exercise that we will support” said Maj. Aaron L. Klein, an intelligence officer assigned to Task Force- African Lion 13.

“It’s a basic intelligence workshop, but it will show them a bit of how we do business,” said the Dallas native.

The ICBW was a four-day workshop that included a discussion on intelligence preparation of the environment (IPOE), systematic approaches to terrain, weather, and cultural considerations of strategic importance. Other topics covered standard terminology and procedures used in intelligence briefs, military grid-reference systems, and a review of maps created for use during the Command Post Exercise (CPX).

“It’s a great opportunity for them to work together and see how everyone does business. There’s excitement to see how Germans and the National Geospatial Association conduct operations and vice-versa,” added Klein, who is also the intelligence officer for 14th Marine Regiment, out of Fort Worth, Texas.

For the first time, German servicemembers from the Federal Republic of Germany's Armed Forces will participate in a geospatial intelligence exercise along with U.S. military professionals from the NGA.

“This enables us to be ‘multi-national’ and I think that is huge because this exercise is going to grow,” said Klein. “The more nations that play in it, the better it will become. We are honored that they are here and I think they are fitting great with the exercise.”

Unlike the U.S., that enables entry-level military intelligence specialist the opportunity to engage in the career field, partner-nation servicemembers do not train in the analysis of intelligence until the brigade officer levels. Lower-level commands have officers training in other specialties with the additional duty of passing gathered intelligence to their higher command. ICBW training helps these officers with a broad and varied range in operational intelligence affairs.

“In this case, they don’t have the formalized intelligence Military Occupational Specialty like the U.S., and I think they are operational-type officers that end up taking collateral roles,” said Klein. “Hopefully all these intelligence professionals are going to learn and get something out of this course that they can bring back to their intelligence communities.”

Exercise African Lion is an annual training exercise promoting military partnership between U.S. and Moroccan forces and is the largest exercise of its kind on the continent.

“We’re honored to be here and I think we’re doing great things,” Klein added. “Morocco has been one of our allies for such a long time and we like to take any chance to build on these partnerships and get to work with them.”

Exercise African Lion is a U.S. Africa Command-scheduled, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Africa- led, joint multi-lateral exercise. The joint task force consisting of U.S. Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen were able to conduct modified joint training for Exercise African Lion 13, demonstrating their ability to adapt to unpredicted circumstances, restore mission essential tasks, build interoperability and create friendships during the remaining days of the evolution. The logistics component will continue to exercise vigilant, safe and rapid retrograde of almost 1,200 personnel and 250 short-tons of vehicles and equipment while working with Moroccan partners and contractors to sustain the force and redeploy them back to their home stations in a timely and efficient manner.

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Captain Andrew Howard, an intelligence officer instructor assigned to Exercise African Lion 13, introduces “systematic approaches to terrain” during an Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop with U.S., Moroccan and German intelligence officers, April 11. Exercise African Lion is a U.S. Africa Command-scheduled, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Africa- led, joint multi-lateral exercise. The joint task force consisting of U.S. Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen were able to conduct modified joint training for Exercise African Lion 13, demonstrating their ability to adapt to unpredicted circumstances, restore mission essential tasks, build interoperability and create friendships during the remaining days of the evolution. The logistics component will continue to exercise vigilant, safe and rapid retrograde of almost 1,200 personnel and 250 short-tons of vehicles and equipment while working with Moroccan partners and contractors to sustain the force and redeploy them back to their home stations in a timely and efficient manner. (Photo by Sgt. Tatum Vayavananda) 

http://www.marforaf.marines.mil/News/NewsArticleDisplay/tabid/5697/Article/142311/marine-moroccan-and-german-military-intelligence-professionals-conduct-workshop.aspx

U.S., Moroccan, German servicemembers conduct UAV familiarization for African Lion 13

U.S. Marines, along with German and Moroccan counterparts, conducted a small unmanned-flying vehicle familiarization course for Exercise African Lion 13, in Agadir, Morocco, that shared the capabilities of the RQ-11B Raven as part of the Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop, April 13.

The RQ-11B Raven, or “Raven-B,” is the Marine Corps’ lightweight, hand-launched Unmanned Air Vehicle that provides reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition used in contingency operations around the world.

“The Moroccan and German soldiers went through a quick brief on Small Unmanned Aerial Systems and a flight simulator to get more familiarization with the aircraft,” said Sgt. Clayton J. LaGesse, an intelligence specialist from 2nd Battalion, 14th Marine Regiment supporting AL-13.

The UAV is classified as a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle that can operate at a maximum service “ceiling” of more than 10,000 feet.

“After that, we went out into the field and I conducted a flight demonstration,” said LaGesse, a Menomomee Falls, WI native. “It’s a one-man wrecking crew because you can indicate targets and keep troops safe on the ground with just one person if you needed to.”

An important aspect of the Raven-B is that it provides small units with situational awareness and can be employed in all environments for direct or general reconnaissance as well as offensive and defensive force-protection operations.

“The Raven-B is an excellent asset to Marines on the ground; it can be launched from a moving vehicle to recon the road ahead, identify dangers and survey the perimeter of the convoy,” added LaGesse.

The small price of the system is a force multiplier that provides immense advantage in real-world operations. The Raven-B is constructed of thin, water-resistant Kevlar material and weighs less than a loaded M4 service carbine with magazines, at only four pounds,. Coupled with the flight system, it weighs less than an M249 Squad-Automatic Weapon with a combat load of ammunition.

The Raven-B has the capability to be equipped with three different cameras, or “payloads”; one aiming forward, and one for each side of the nose cone. The cameras can record video footage with a live-stream back to the ground-control station and can capture still photographs, regardless of the time of day with the addition of an Infra-Red camera capability for night-time surveillance.

“We were shown the basics [of the Raven-B] and it makes sense that you would have that capability,” said German Maj. Timon Hoppe, the officer-in-charge of the German geospatial intelligence cell participating in African Lion 13.

The U.S. Marines, sailors, and soldiers, along with German and Moroccan counterparts, saw the Raven-B in action as it flew a 2km flight path demonstrating its capability to survey the surrounding area. Members of the class were able to watch the live-video feed as the Raven-B flew through the training area and around the observers.

“We were shown how [the Raven-B]is set up, maintained, and how it’s operated and it was interesting to see and very impressive because we have UAVs like that, but it was the first time I saw it live,” said Hoppe, a Husum, Germany, native.

The ICBW training helped U.S., Moroccan and German officers share procedures to build a broad, varied and enhanced understanding of each country’s intelligence strategies and capabilities.

“It’s important they get a sense of our capabilities because they are our partners, so they are part of our link to North Africa,” said LaGesse. “With our partnerships, we can have a bit more understanding of the culture and the environment.”

Exercise African Lion 13 is an annually-scheduled military engagement promoting partnership between the U.S. and Moroccan forces and is the largest exercise of its kind on the continent. For the first time, members of the Federation of German Armed Forces participated in a geospatial portion of the exercise.

“The partnerships, whether it’s air, ground, or command-level, is forming bonds and bringing more cohesion between our militaries,” said LaGesse. “It’s vital to our friendships with [international] militaries, should we have a contingency effort and we ever need to work together.”

The U.S. Africa Command-scheduled multi-lateral exercise is led by U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Africa with support from Marine, Army, Air Force and Navy units throughout the U.S. The joint task force consisting of U.S. Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen were able to conduct modified bi-lateral and joint training for Exercise African Lion 13 demonstrating their ability to adapt to unpredicted circumstances, restore mission-essential tasks, build interoperability and create friendships during the three-week evolution. The logistics component exercised vigilant, safe and rapid retrograde of almost 1,200 personnel and 250 short-tons of vehicles and equipment while working with Moroccan partners and contractors to sustain the force and redeploy them back to their home stations in a timely and efficient manner.

US Marines

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U.S. Marines, along with German and Moroccan counterparts, conducted a small unmanned-flying vehicle familiarization course for Exercise African Lion 13, April 13, in Agadir, Morocco, that shared the capabilities of the RQ-11B Raven as part of the Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop. Exercise African Lion 13 was a U.S. Africa Command-directed, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Africa-led multi-lateral military engagement between U.S., Moroccan and German armed forces. The joint task force consisting of U.S. Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen were able to conduct modified bi-lateral and joint training for Exercise African Lion 13 demonstrating their ability to adapt to unpredicted circumstances, restore mission-essential tasks, build interoperability and create friendships during the three-week evolution. The logistics component exercised vigilant, safe and rapid retrograde of almost 1,200 personnel and 250 short-tons of vehicles and equipment while working with Moroccan partners and contractors to sustain the force and redeploy them back to their home stations in a timely and efficient manner.

Image IPB

Before a flight demonstration of the RQ-11 B “Raven,” an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, Sgt. Clayton P. LaGesse, an intelligence Marine assigned to 14th Marine Regiment, reviews coordinates during a Small Unmanned Aerial Systems class as part of the Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop of Exercise African Lion 13.

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During the pre-flight inspection, Capt. Andrew Howard and Sgt. Clayton P. LaGesse, instructors for the Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop of Exercise African Lion 13, perform an operation check of the cameras onf the RQ-11B “Raven” Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.

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During the pre-flight inspection, Capt. Andrew Howard and Sgt. Clayton P. LaGesse, instructors for the Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop of Exercise African Lion 13, perform an operation check on the body of the RQ-11B “Raven” Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.

Image IPB

During the pre-flight inspection, Capt. Andrew Howard and Sgt. Clayton P. LaGesse, instructors for the Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop of Exercise African Lion 13, perform an operation check on the body of the RQ-11B “Raven” Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.

Image IPB

U.S. servicemembers, along with Moroccan and German military intelligence counterparts, observe Sgt. Clayton P. LaGesse and Capt. Andrew Howard, instructors for the Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop of Exercise African Lion 13, as they perform a pre-flight operations check with the RQ-11B “Raven,” an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle used for surveillance and reconnaissance.

Image IPB

During the pre-flight inspection, Capt. Andrew Howard and Sgt. Clayton P. LaGesse, instructors for the Intelligence Capacity Building Workshop of Exercise African Lion 13, perform an operation check of the cameras onf the RQ-11B “Raven” Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.

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Tres joli vidéo des FRA . Le serieux commence a partir de 11.00 avec au menu : MF2000, F-16 , F-5 Tiger 3 , Puma , Gazelle , Chinook et j'en passe ...

Meilleure sequence de la vidéo , de 17.50 a 19.00 , avec le F-16 dans ses oeuvres  >:(

http-~~-//www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=FmnQLXen7lo

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...
 
AASM guided bomb laser shot with the F-1 ASTRAC ( MF-2000)
 
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HALO/HAHO team 
 
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Pilot training students on T-6 Texan
 
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Africa AFM
 
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Northrop F-5E Tiger III 
 
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Mirage F-1 ASTRAC
 
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:cool:

 


 

 

Cubic Defense Applications Inc., San Diego, Calif., has been awarded a 24,999,949 firm-fixed-price contract for foreign military sales P5Combat Training System (P5CTS), combined hardware buy. Contractor will provide (P5CTS) hardware to provide an instrumented training capability that increases, maintains, and assesses combat proficiency in the following mission areas: counter air, close air support, strategic attack, air interdiction, and electronic combat. Work will be performed at San Diego, Calif., and Fort Walton Beach, Fla., and is expected to be complete by July 20, 2015. This award is a result of a sole-source acquisition. This award is for the governments of Singapore, Morocco, Oman and Saudi Arabia under the FMS program. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center/EBYK, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity (FA8678-14-C-0046).

 

 

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Edited by FARSOLDIER
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Sorry admin ;) 

 

 

 

To this modernization will include the installation of a GPS-hybridized inertial , which will give it a SNA capacity and will also better driving shooting in the air-air and air-to-ground modes. It is planned to install a head-up display High (HUD) instead of the current single viewfinder. The new navigation system will also better prepare assignments and training to failure. The handle is equipped with new features that will provide concept HOTAS (Hands on controller and Channel) . The current ejector seat Martin Baker MK4 type will be replaced by a newer model MK10L kind to include a seat back 10 °.

Question Alphajets receive the communication a new mode S transponder and radio to new ICAO standards 




In particular, the development of modernization Alpha Jet export is successfully completed by delivery of the aircraft prototype and two pre-series aircraft. 



The Alpha-Jet export modernization program is part poursuivi.Sa development is complete mid-2012 with the delivery of the aircraft modified prototype factory and both changed in the customer's premises preproduction . Delivery of kits series has begun and will continue until October 2013

http://psk.blog.24heures.ch/archive/...-francais.html

 

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L-3 Link Simulation & Training has upgraded a fielded F-16C Block 52 aircrew training device (also known as ATD system) and achieved a ready-for-training milestone on a second identical equipment for the Royal Moroccan Air Force (RMAF). Both devices are installed at the RMAF’s Ben Guerir Air Base, north of Marrakech.

   Since the RMAF’s initial training system began training pilots in 2011, the simulator has been used for more than 6,000 hours to hone pilots’ air-to-air and air-to-ground combat skills.

   Each system is integrated with 360-degree field-of-view SimuSphere visual display and SimuView personal computer image generation system that produces correlated out-the-window and cockpit sensor display imagery.

   During simulation exercises, pilots are able to acquire and identify targets, deliver a wide range of ordnance, practice takeoffs and landings, conduct aerial in-flight refueling, undertake low-level flight maneuvers and practice emergency procedures.

   Morocco has procured 24 F-16C/D Block 52 Fighting Falcon combat aircraft to Lockheed Martin comprising 18 single-seat and six two-seat aircraft.

 

http://defesaglobal.wordpress.com/

 

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Link F-16 Morocco

 

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