Libanais_75

Armée de l'air des E.A.U

Recommended Posts

Avez vous bien noté ceci ?     http://www.opex360.com/2019/11/21/la-france-et-les-emirats-renforcent-leur-cooperation-industrielle-dans-le-secteur-de-larmement/

Citation

Le détail de cette modernisation, qui concernera une trentaine d’appareils, n’a pas été précisé. On sait seulement qu’elle permettra de maintenir leur potentiel après 2030. 

En dehors de la revente bien improbable des autres d'occasion ( à qui ? ), mais qui ne concerne pas les EAU en tant qu'utilisateur... la modernisation de la seule moitié de la flotte m'interroge !  Prolongation à toute la flotte après ?  Réduction de voilure ? Ou faire la place à un autre chasseur  mi-2020s ? 

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a 8 minutes, Bechar06 a dit :

Avez vous bien noté ceci ?     http://www.opex360.com/2019/11/21/la-france-et-les-emirats-renforcent-leur-cooperation-industrielle-dans-le-secteur-de-larmement/

En dehors de la revente bien improbable des autres d'occasion ( à qui ? ), mais qui ne concerne pas les EAU en tant qu'utilisateur... la modernisation de la seule moitié de la flotte m'interroge !  Prolongation à toute la flotte après ?  Réduction de voilure ? Ou faire la place à un autre chasseur  mi-2020s ? 

Il ne faut pas oublier que les EAU ont acheté leurs avions en deux fois. Peut-être réservent-ils la modernisation aux appareils les plus récents ayant le plus de potentiel.

Ou alors, peut-être qu'au contraire, lors du passage des plus anciens 2000 au nouveau standard (quand ils avaient acheté l'autre moitié de 2000 directement au standard -9, les 30 premiers avaient été modernisé au même standard par la même occasion), le potentiel de régénération n'avait pas été complètement fait et que ce sera l'occasion de le refaire.

Je penche pour la première solution, mais en tous les cas, y'a une logique derrière, et elle doit pas être très loin.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a une heure, Bechar06 a dit :

Avez vous bien noté ceci ?     http://www.opex360.com/2019/11/21/la-france-et-les-emirats-renforcent-leur-cooperation-industrielle-dans-le-secteur-de-larmement/

En dehors de la revente bien improbable des autres d'occasion ( à qui ? ), mais qui ne concerne pas les EAU en tant qu'utilisateur... la modernisation de la seule moitié de la flotte m'interroge !  Prolongation à toute la flotte après ?  Réduction de voilure ? Ou faire la place à un autre chasseur  mi-2020s ? 

A une époque, on parlait de 200 M€ pour la modernisation de 63 mirage 2000-9 et maintenant on parle de 500 M€ pour la modernisation de 30 mirage 2000-9 (et plus de 300 M€ pour les munitions)

Je me demande ce que va concerner cette modernisation. Cela devient une modernisation massive.

Sinon, les plus vieux mirage 2000-9 ont été livrés en 1989. Il me parait cohérent de ne pas payer une modernisation pour les maintenir jusqu'en 2030. Leur remplacement doit "logiquement" avoir lieu 10 ans avant la deuxième série.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ils ne disent ps si l'engin modernisé sera plus à même de cibler les furtifs (CF les tondeuses à gazon volante de l'EI)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, kalligator said:

Ils ne disent ps si l'engin modernisé sera plus à même de cibler les furtifs (CF les tondeuses à gazon volante de l'EI)

Le système n'a pas eu de problème particulier contre les drones des rebelles ou de Daesh ...

Ce sont contre les drones missile de croisière Israélien que le système - ou son utilisation - on montré leurs limites.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J'avais lu que les Pantsy avaient montré leur limites au cours de l'attaque contre une base russe en Syrie (le Tor avait bien mieux fonctionné)

Attaque effectuée par des tgv (non pas le train)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First F-35 Sale To UAE Could Still Be Years Away

Oct 30, 2019 Steve Trimble | Aviation Week & Space Technology

https://aviationweek.com/combat-aircraft/first-f-35-sale-uae-could-still-be-years-away

si pb accès

During the same week as the Dubai Airshow in November 2009, Lockheed Martin celebrated the first flight of the AF-1 test aircraft for the F-35 development program, and a top air force official in the United Arab Emirates (UAE)—Brig. Gen. Ibrahim Naser Alalawi—publicly declared his “hope” that his country would procure a fifth-generation fighter “within a couple years.” A decade later, Lockheed has delivered more than 435 F-35s to eight countries, but none so far to the UAE. 

With the 2019 edition of the biannual air show ready to run from Nov. 17-21, the UAE’s search for a new stealth fighter may be set to take nearly another decade. In the last two years, the UAE has commissioned a billion-dollar upgrade program for the air force’s F-16 Block 60s and launched a service-life extension program for its Mirage 2000s. The combination gives the UAE the flexibility to defer one of the world’s largest fleet replacement programs for fighters by several years. 

Fifth-gen fighter goal is still elusive for UAE

Russian, European options are in the mix

“It certainly looks like the UAE is trying to skip a generation and coast on their F-16 Block 60 and Mirage 2000 force until they can get F-35s, which will likely be around 2026 or 2027,” says Richard Aboulafia, vice president of analysis for the Teal Group consultancy. That timeline assumes orders by the UAE around 2024, followed by deliveries to a U.S. training base in 2026 and transfer to the UAE around a year later, Aboulafia says. 

A UAE Mirage 2000-9, F-16 Block 60 and a U.S. Air Force F-35A fly formation over the Persian Gulf, but upgrades for the UAE fleet likely mean a long-sought F-35A acquisition could still be several years away. Credit: U.S. Air Force

It was only two years ago that the UAE’s potential F-35 order appeared more imminent. During the first year of U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration, officials succeeded in reopening stalled negotiations with the Gulf Cooperation Council on several arms sales. “The Obama administration would not talk about the F-35” to countries in the Middle East, says Derek Bisaccio, a regional market analyst for Forecast International. “That seemed to change when Trump took office.” U.S. defense officials openly discussed the “ongoing,” early talks with the UAE about a potential F-35 deal during the last Dubai Airshow in 2017. 

The timing of the new sales discussions also followed a pattern of U.S. policy. The first F-35I ordered by Israel arrived at Nevatim AB in December 2016. The U.S. government generally offers Israel at least a five-year head start on new fighter technology, then allows other governments in the regions to import the aircraft, Aboulafia says. 

The F-35 may not be the only fighter on the UAE’s long-term shopping list. Alalawi displayed a picture of the F-35 as he expressed hope in a fifth-generation fighter acquisition in 2009, but the UAE is not exclusively tied to the American fighter. In 2017, the UAE government signed a memorandum of understanding with the Russian Aircraft Corp. to collaborate on the design of a lightweight, next-generation fighter. Neither side has publicly moved the relationship forward over the last two years.

“There’s been precious few details on what the concept of the aircraft would be,” Bisaccio says. “This could well prove in time for the UAE a bargaining chip in negotiations with the United States.”

The UAE has been careful to avoid reliance on a single government for weapons. The current fighter fleet is split between the U.S.-made F-16s and French-built Mirage 2000s. That policy could continue even if the UAE signs a deal in the long term for F-35s.

A line of UAE Mirage 2000-9s stand on the runway at Nellis AFB, Nevada. Along with the F-16 Block 16s, the Mirage 2000s could remain at the heart of the UAE fighter fleet for at least another decade. Credit: U.S. Air Force

“There’s still a chance the UAE Air Force is going to give a little bit to everybody,” says Michel Merluzeau, director of Aerospace Market Analysis for AirInsight. “If they acquire an F-35, I think they’d go with a micro-fleet. Maybe a wing: 30-40 aircraft. It would be a mistake to think they’d buy an equivalent number of fighters as they did with the F-16.”

The most logical alternative to the F-35 for the UAE could be the Rafale, Dassault’s successor to the UAE Mirage 2000 fleet. Block upgrades, such as the F4 and F5, will introduce teaming capabilities with unmanned combat air vehicles, along with new weapons and sensors. 

For the moment, the UAE has time to wait and consider its options. The service-life extension for the Mirage 2000 fleet provides the UAE with at least a decade to deliver a replacement. 

“When you look at the [Mirage 2000s], these are near [the] Rafale in terms of avionics and weapon systems,” Merluzeau says. “They have a good 10 years left.”

 

Editor's note: The headline was changed to focus on the UAE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Le 29/11/2019 à 15:32, kalligator a dit :

J'avais lu que les Pantsy avaient montré leur limites au cours de l'attaque contre une base russe en Syrie (le Tor avait bien mieux fonctionné)

Attaque effectuée par des tgv (non pas le train)

Auriez vous plus de détail sur ces limites et sur les "TGV" ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 3 heures, LePetitCharles a dit :

Auriez vous plus de détail sur ces limites et sur les "TGV" ?

Hello,

Quelques débuts de pistes ici et (mais ça reste très générique, le pantsir n'étant pas le sujet principal)

A+/Yankev

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TGV Tondeuses à Gazon Volantes : drônes artisanaux en bois et plastique fabriqués par les islamistes, redoutables car très bon marchés et presque indétectables.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 3 heures, mgtstrategy a dit :

Les -9 à l'honneur

j'ai aussi lu qu'ils suivaient les drones turcs à la trace et les descendaient systematiquement

J'y croirai avec des images...

Qu'est-ce que c'est que ces histoires encore...

Mais bon ça fait de la pub c'est bien.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ca enverrait aussi le message que le JF17 est nettement moins bon qu'attendu.

je ne sais pas si le client peut revendre des mirage 2000-9 sans l'accord de Dassault ou de la France à n'importe quel pays

 

Edited by zx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
il y a une heure, mgtstrategy a dit :

Comme les indiens?

Litening G4 ou Litening III pour les indiens sur leurs Rafale a priori.

Histoire d'uniformiser le parc.

C'est con pour le Talios qui semble voué à une carrière florissante.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

US to sell F-35 jets to UAE as part of Israel deal

Citation

A senior Israeli source has told "Globes" that the US will sell the fighter aircraft to the UAE despite Israel's opposition.

The sale of advanced US and Israeli defense technology to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is an important part of the Israel-UAE peace deal which has been hammered out. The icing on the cake for the UAE would be if it can acquire Lockheed Martin F-35 stealth jets, which the US only sells to a few carefully selected allies including Israel. The US recently cancelled a deal to sell F-35s to Turkey.

A senior Israeli defense source has confirmed that the US will sell F-35s to the UAE and say that such a sale would benefit Israel. The F-35 would be in the hands of a friendly state with identical interests and in close proximity to Iran. The source would not confirm whether Israel has actually agreed to this dramatic development, although officially Israel remains opposed. In 1995, the then Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin acceded to US President Bill Clinton's request to sell F-16 fighter jets - at that time the most advanced combat aircraft available - to the UAE.

Interviewed by US National Public Radio US Ambassador to Israel David Friedman said that the move by the UAE to becoming a regional ally of the US, which change the threat assessment about it and help in all matters regarding future weapons deals. He hinted that Israel's position on the matter was of major importance.

An additional dimension on the issue is the US desire to push out the Russians and Chinese as arms seller in the Persian Gulf. The UAE has for some time made its procurement needs known but Washington has hesitated on advanced weaponry like the F-35 because of Israel's position. Russia has tried to fill the vacuum and has been offering its own fighter jets.

UAE Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan is himself a combat helicopter pilot who was trained by Britain's Royal Air Force and he is determined to strengthen the UAE's armed forces, especially the air force. This may well be a major reason why the UAE is eager to sign a peace agreement with Israel. Such an agreement would allow open cooperation between the UAE and Israel's defense industries, which would be able to significantly upgrade the UAE armed forces, as well as paving the way for them to buy the most advanced US and European weapons systems.

Israel's Prime Minister's Office insists that Israel has not agreed to the sale of F-35s to the UAE. "The historic peace agreement between Israel and the UAE does not include any agreement by Israel to any arms deals between the US and UAE. From the outset, the prime minister has opposed the sale of F-35s and other advanced weapons systems to countries in the Middle East, including Arab states that make peace with Israel."

The prime minister has expressed a consistent opinion on this time after time to the US administration and it hasn't changed. This consistent opposition to the sale of F-35 jets was voiced again on June 2 when the head of the National Security Council, spoke at the behest of the prime minister with the Israel Air Force commander Amikam Norkin."

"On July 7 the prime minister spoke with US Ambassador Friedman, and the prime minister explicitly expressed his opposition to the sale of F-35 aircraft and any other advanced weapons systems in the Middle East including as part of peace agreements. On July 8, the prime minister sent a letter to Secretary of State Pompeo through Ambassador Friedman clarifying Israel's position even following obtaining a peace agreement. Defense Minister Gantz was updated on this on July 29."

"On August 3, at the instructions of the prime minister, the Israeli Ambassador in Washington Ron Dermer met with Secretary of State Pompeo and repeated Israel's explicit opposition to the sale of F-35 and advanced weapons systems to any state in the Middle East. The peace agreement with the UAE does not include any clause on this, and the US made it clear to Israel that it will always strive to maintain Israel's qualitative edge."

https://en.globes.co.il/en/article-us-to-sell-f-35-jets-to-uae-as-part-of-israel-deal-1001339722#utm_source=RSS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
il y a 5 minutes, Ponto Combo a dit :

it can acquire Lockheed Martin F-35 stealth jets, which the US only sells to a few carefully selected allies including Israel

Hein ? XDD

 

 

Bon par contre, cela pourrait aisément refermer la porte des spéculations concernant un éventuel achat de Rafale par les EAU.

Edited by TarpTent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Member Statistics

    5,526
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    Billou
    Newest Member
    Billou
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    20,934
    Total Topics
    1,329,647
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    3
    Total Blogs
    2
    Total Entries