Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Ici on cause MBT ....


Recommended Posts

Comme je le disais plus haut, le leclerc est invulnérable de face aux armes antichar de l'infanterie et on rajoute les flèches pour la tourelle (c'est pas moi l'affirme).

Non, ce sont les gens de chez GIAT.

Tiens, je me demande pourquoi ils affirment ça?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bah du blindage réactif forcément puisque le Leclerc est doté de NxRA, c'est pas ce bon vieux blindage explosif mais ça reste dans la catégorie des blindages réactifs.

Sympa le thermos. Une bonne soupe ou une bonne boisson chaude n'importe quand c'est pas mal comme idée :lol:

Une bonne chose pour le Chally serait de renforcer/repenser la tourelle de manière plus harmonieuse que par un simple ajout de ferraille (ça aide mais ça alourdit un char qui n'en a vraiment pas besoin) et aussi le glacis qui est assez light. J'imagine qu'une remotorisation s'imposera pour que la bête encaisse sans trop broncher le supplément de poids... A quand un petit MTU 883 EPP

Link to post
Share on other sites

Le Leclerc c'est le meilleur char du monde, point! (quand il fonctionne...)

Le K-2 sud-coréen est bien plus moderne...

Quand au Challenger 2 je lis beaucoup de critiques mais il a beaucoup de qualités : solides et surtout un excellent canon. Dommage que ce ne soit pas un char très dynamique.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Le K-2 sud-coréen est bien plus moderne...

Quand au Challenger 2 je lis beaucoup de critiques mais il a beaucoup de qualités : solides et surtout un excellent canon. Dommage que ce ne soit pas un char très dynamique.

De même pour le nouveau char japonnais.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Le K2 et le baby tank japonais sont un peu trop jeunes je pense pour qu'on puisse les qualifier de bon char, ils vont devoir d'abord s'affranchir de tous les soucis de jeunesse et après on pourra en reparler.

Pour le Chally, il est victime de la philosophie qui présidait à la conception des chars quand il a été mis sur la planche à dessin, tout simplement prévu comme un char de défense avant tout, il mise sur un front de tourelle épais comme un coffre fort (et c'est peu de le dire! ) et un canon qui semblerait aurait des performances intéressantes dans des gammes de portée médianes avec des obus assez redoutables, même contre des cibles bien blindées. A côté de cela, il a tous les défauts que l'on peut attendre d'un char de ce type mais on verra ce que donnera la mise à niveau tirée des enseignements de l'Irak, le CLIP dont parle Will.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pour le Chally, il est victime de la philosophie qui présidait à la conception des chars quand il a été mis sur la planche à dessin, tout simplement prévu comme un char de défense avant tout, il mise sur un front de tourelle épais comme un coffre fort (et c'est peu de le dire! ) et un canon qui semblerait aurait des performances intéressantes dans des gammes de portée médianes avec des obus assez redoutables, même contre des cibles bien blindées. A côté de cela, il a tous les défauts que l'on peut attendre d'un char de ce type mais on verra ce que donnera la mise à niveau tirée des enseignements de l'Irak, le CLIP dont parle Will.

A ce que je sais, il y aura un nouvelle tourelle, mais le plus grand changement sera pour recevoir le canon L55...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sympa le thermos. Une bonne soupe ou une bonne boisson chaude n'importe quand c'est pas mal comme idée :lol:

Nan mais tu plaisante Berkut ... :-X C'est pour le thé bien sur!!!

Est-ce que le Leclerc a un frigo pour la Kro'?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Le Arjun n'est pas aimee par certains de l'armee indien, mais le T-90 aussi a des problemes...

Ajai Shukla: Friendly fire damages the Arjun

BROADSWORD

Ajai Shukla / New Delhi April 22, 2008

The Arjun tank is in pitched battle even before fully entering service with the Indian Army. Ironically, the most hostile fire is coming from the men who will eventually ride the tank into war: the army’s mechanised forces. These experts, it now emerges, have rubbished the tank before Parliament’s Standing Committee on Defence; they say they will not accept the Arjun unless it improves considerably. What benchmarks it must meet remain undefined.

The Arjun saga encapsulates the pitfalls in any attempt to build a complex weapons system. It all began in 1974, when the Defence R&D Organisation (DRDO) undertook to build India’s own Main Battle Tank (MBT). The euphoria gradually waned as the DRDO missed deadline after deadline, eventually losing the army’s trust with unfulfilled promises that the tank was just around the corner. The army undermined the project in equal measure, periodically “updating” the design as technology moved on. DRDO scientists joke that whenever they approached a technology solution, the next issue of Jane’s Defence Weekly would give the army new ideas for upgrading their demands.

Exaggeration notwithstanding, the DRDO has a point in complaining about changes in the Arjun design goalposts. There is logic too in the army’s plea that it could not accept a 1970s, or a 1980s design in the 1990s and 2000. But there was neither logic nor reason in the recriminations that followed. Instead of design and R&D partners with equal stakes in the Arjun, the DRDO and the army locked themselves into mutual finger-pointing: no matter how much the Arjun was improved, there were always some flaws that remained to be sorted out.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD), meanwhile, watched mutely. With the Arjun ploughing through endless trials — 15 Arjuns have already run 75,000 km, and fired 10,000 rounds in the most extensive trials ever — the army insisted on another tank. In the late 1970s, the army bought the T-72; in the 1990s, the T-90s came along. But despite thousands of crores of rupees paid to Moscow, the Russian tanks have been raddled with problems; now hundreds of crores more are being spent in upgrading their night fighting capabilities, navigation equipment, radio sets, and their armour. Tens of Indian soldiers have died as the barrels of Russian tanks burst while firing.

In contrast, just Rs 300 crore was used in building and developing the Arjun. This is not to say that the Russian tanks are worthless. Operating military equipment is fraught with danger and upgrading is a continuous process. But the army’s tolerance for Russian defects contrasts starkly with its impatience for the Arjun.

Some army exasperation was, perhaps, understandable when the DRDO was plugging a tank that was not yet fit for the battlefield. But it is no longer justified when the Arjun is performing well. Soldiers from the 43 Armoured Regiment, which operates 15 trial Arjuns, praise the tank whole-heartedly. Problem solving will remain a part of operating the Arjun, just like with India’s Russian fleet. But while the soldiers and junior officers accept that the Arjun has come good, the generals remain fixed in the past.

As a result the army, incongruously, finds itself defending its Russian tanks from the Indian challenge of the Arjun. The tank’s developers, the Central Vehicle R&D Establishment at Chennai, has been clamouring for face-to-face comparative trials, where the Arjun, the T-72 and the T-90 are put through the same paces. After first agreeing — and even issuing a detailed trail directive in 2005 — the army has backed away from comparative trials. Instead, it told the MoD that it was buying 124 Arjuns, and trials were needed only to ascertain its requirements for spares. While doing these trials — which have nothing to do with the Arjun’s performance — the army has testified before the Standing Committee on Defence that the tank’s performance was suspect.

Contrast the Indian Army’s approach with how other countries approach complex defence R&D projects with long gestation periods, where technology gets outdated during the development cycle. The four-nation Eurofighter consortium bypassed the “technology trap” by agreeing to first develop a simpler fighter, which all participants would buy as Tranche 1 of the project. During Tranche-1 manufacture, newly developed technologies would be harnessed into a newer, more capable Eurofighter. The last Tranche-1 aircraft was delivered last month; the new multi-role Tranche-2 aircraft has been developed, meanwhile; deliveries will start now. Clear development milestones and a more accepting approach by the users have made Eurofighter a success.

The army placed an order for 124 Arjuns eight years ago, when the tank was not even a viable fighting platform. Now that the Arjun is pulling its weight (almost 60 tons!) and those 124 tanks are rolling off the production line in Avadi, this order should be seen as Tranche-1. The CVRDE is refining many of the Arjun’s systems with technologies that have been developed more recently, particularly through harnessing India’s growing IT proficiency. Assuring a Tranche-2 order for improved Mark 2 Arjuns, and allocating R&D funding would set the project on a path where India might never need to buy a foreign tank again.

One reason for the army’s judgemental approach to the Arjun is its lack of involvement in the tank’s development. Unlike the navy, which has its own directorate of naval design, and which produces itself the conceptual blueprints of any new warship, the army has no technical expertise — nor any department — that designs its tanks. The Directorate General of Mechanised Warfare (DGMF) is staffed by combat officers from the mechanised forces, most of whom see the Arjun not as a national defence project, but as a tank that they must drive into battle. A whole new approach is needed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Qui touchent les chars en général, il faut souvent des systèmes additionnels pour que les MBT ces grosses masses de ferrailles ne se transforment pas en autocuiseurs.

si j'ai bien saisi le coup de l'accident, le système de chargement aurait pris feu? C'est quand étrange ça... Ca ne serait pas plutôt une mauvaise étanchéité de la culasse qui aurait pété au moment du tir et fait détonner des munitions dans la caisse?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ils supportent mal la chaleur, les systèmes de refroidissement ont un peu de mal à suivre. Un problème qui touchait aussi l'Arjun.

Et le leclerc (aussi sensible à l'humidité, faut le faire dormir dans sa petite housse)

(Aïe ouille, pas la tête!)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Pour ce qui est de l'autodéfense, de la légitime défense, de la protection de cible (des collègues, des civils dont on a la responsabilité..) si je me goure pas, face à une attaque imminente le servant peut faire feu de ses armes. Mais dans la plupart des cas le chef de char aura déjà indiqué les cibles vu qu'il est aussi l'observateur du char (encore plus vrai avec les hunter killer)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

concernant les résultats obtenus lors des éssais comparatifs en Gréce , j'ai trouvé ça :

The winner of the Greek Main Battle Tank (MBT) competition is expected to be announced in August this year but results of competition trials obtained by Jane's Defence Weekly have placed the German-made Leopard 2A5 in pole position.

The first batch of MBTs will be for 250 vehicles plus variants. Six MBTs carried out extensive firepower and mobility trials in Greece manned by Greek Army crews. These were the French Giat Industries Leclerc; German Krauss-Maffei Wegmann Leopard 2A5 in latest Swedish Strv 122 configuration; Russian Omsk Machine Construction Plant T-80U; Ukrainian Malyshev Plant T-84; UK Vickers Defence Systems Challenger 2E; and the US General Dynamics Land Systems M1A2 Abrams.

Of these six vehicles, out of a maximum possible operational and technical score of 100%, best performing were: Leopard 2A5, 78.65%; M1A2 Abrams, 72.21%; Leclerc, 72.03%; and Challenger, 2E 69.19%

The Leopard 2A5 was the only one with a demonstrated deep fording capability, while the M1A2 had the best firing results during hunter/killer target engagements.

The German 1,500hp MTU EuroPowerPack was fitted in both the Leclerc and the Challenger 2E and these two vehicles had the best cruising range and lower fuel consumption.

According to JDW sources, the recommendation of the Greek Armour Directorate to the Council for Defence Planning and Programme was that the choice be limited to just two vehicles: the German Krauss-Maffei Wegmann Leopard 2A5; and the US General Dynamics Land Systems M1A2 Abrams.

la source originale de l'artice, c'est jane's mais je n'arrive plus à mettre la main sur le lien vers l'article original de jane's

concernant la capacité de tir en mouvement, il y a eu sur tanknet ce post interressant sur les MBT modernes et leur systéme de stabilisation :

http://63.99.108.76/forums/index.php?showtopic=8846&st=20

si je comprends bien, seul l'organe de visée est stabilisé et la mise à feu du canon se fait de façon électronique quand le canon coincide avec la stabilisation 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

oui il a été écarté lors de l'évaluation technico-opérationelle ( comme le Leclerc , le T80 et le T84 )

l'état major grec à l'issue des éssais des différentes machines avait conseillé en n°1 le léopard2 et en n°2 le M1A2

c'est le léopard2 ( une version à canon de 120L55 du STR122 éssentiellement ) qui a été choisi

le Challenger avait été classé 4iè des éssais ( 1er léopard2 , 2iè M1A2 , 3iè Leclerc ( à quasi égalité avec le M1A2 ), 4iè T80, 5iè T84 )

pour les exercices de tirs, le challenger avait eu des résultats similaires à ceux du Leclerc juste en dessous du M1A2 et du Léopard2

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest ZedroS

salut

je ne suis pas expert en chars, loin de là, mais il me semblait que le leclerc était un des rares chars au monde à avoir une telle latitude de tir en mouvement, du fait de sa conception moderne lui donnant une meilleure stabilité sur les 3 axes. Suis je une fois de plus dans l'erreur ou cela n'a t il pas été, stricto sensus, testé ?

D'ailleurs que disent les pro "leclers meilleur char du monde" de cet échec ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

salut

je ne suis pas expert en chars, loin de là, mais il me semblait que le leclerc était un des rares chars au monde à avoir une telle latitude de tir en mouvement, ...

ça y est, c'est reparti  :P

A chaque fois, il va falloir expliquer que les journalistes de TF1 s'emballent carément en disant que le Leclerc est le seul à pouvoir tirer en mouvement ... et que c'est le meilleur char au monde.

Le Leclerc a une bonne stab, mais il est d'une génération "décalée" par rapport à ses concurrents donc présente une meilleure perfo de tir en roulant mais les autres chars aussi ont une conduite de tir qui leur permettent de tirer en roulant. Et ils sont bien meilleurs sur d'autres caractéristiques mais il y a des pages et des pages de topics qui en parle ... lis-les.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Member Statistics

    5,615
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    RMR_22
    Newest Member
    RMR_22
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21,238
    Total Topics
    1,431,176
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...