Sign in to follow this  
LBP

ABM US

Recommended Posts

Un état des lieux des solutions US de DAMB (défense anti-missile ballistique )

http://web02.aviationweek.com/aw/mobileBlogDetail.do?parameter=getBlogDetail&channel=defense&?plckController=Blog&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&newspaperUserId=27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7&plckPostId=Blog%3a27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7Post%3ae78f35d3-6fa8-48f1-bbea-1ceef4a0356b&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest

Also, these programs have garnered international support and plenty of money for U.S. contractors. Several nations are eyeing Thaad, and support from Aegis-equipped nations continues. The U.S.-Japan relationship has evolved as Tokyo continues to equip its ships with SM-3s. The pair are also continuing work on the SM-3 IIA upgrade interceptor. And, most recently, France has begun to discuss a cooperative effort with the U.S. for an ICBM killer that could take the form of an SM-3 IIA-like deal. PAC-3 sales continue to be strong.

So, at the very least, the missile defense vision has been partially realized. Tests have proven that these systems can to some extent take on more complex targets, and the proliferation of fielded systems makes the architecture more robust.

But by no means does the missile “shield” exist that many Americans assume is protecting them every day. And even fledgling international efforts aren’t without major flaws. The U.S. decision in February to end its cooperative work with Germany and Italy on the Medium-Extended Air Defense System (Meads) came as a blow to some in Europe and effectively dismantled a flagship international cooperation program. Lockheed Martin, the primary U.S. company behind the project, continues to lobby hard to revive the effort (subscribers see our Jen DiMascio’s recent piece), but this is likely to fall on deaf ears in Washington.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://nationalinterest.org/commentary/the-failures-missile-defense-7248

In some cases, the gap between what the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) has been touting and the scientific facts is astonishing. For example, in an August 2011 handout, the MDA says “We will achieve early intercept capability against MRBMs, IRBMs, and ICBMs from today’s regional threats by 2020 or sooner.”

But one month later, the DSB concluded that early intercept in and of itself “is not a useful objective for missile defense.” In other words, DOD’s own scientists had to point out how far MDA has strayed from the basic physics of its systems.

In a March 6, 2012, hearing of the Strategic Force Subcommittee of the House Committee on Armed Services, Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-CA) noted that the DSB and the NRC had expressed concern about the overall effectiveness of U.S. missile defenses. In response, MDA chief Lt. Gen. Patrick O’Reilly referred to the Precision Tracking Space System (PTSS) as the solution to improve reliability and discrimination capabilities.

Presumably Lt. Gen. O’Reilly already knew that the NAS study had concluded that PTSS should be cancelled. The study noted that the PTSS “is too far away from the threat to provide useful discrimination data, does not avoid the need for overhead persistent infrared (OPIR) cueing, and is very expensive.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le 5 Juillet, les Etats Unis vont effectuer un autre essai anti-balistique mi-course. L'essai pourrait reporter au 6 ou au 7 aussi.

Les zones de NOTAM sont les suivantes -

Image IPB

Vu les NOTAM cet essai est très similaire à celui de FTG-06. Il s'agirait donc soit de FTG-06b (avec CE-II EKV), ou alors FTG-07 (avec CE-I EKV).

Image IPB

Dans ce domaine, les US et la Chine continuent de mener la course.

Henri K.

L'échec de FTG-07...

Missile Defense Test Conducted

The Missile Defense Agency, U.S. Air Force 30th Space Wing, Joint Functional Component Command, Integrated Missile Defense (JFCC IMD) and U.S. Northern Command conducted  an integrated exercise and flight test today of the Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) element of the nation’s Ballistic Missile Defense System. Although a primary objective was the intercept of a long-range ballistic missile target launched from the U.S. Army’s Reagan Test Site on Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, an intercept was not achieved.  The interceptor missile was launched from Vandenberg AFB, Calif.

Program officials will conduct an extensive review to determine the cause or causes of any anomalies which may have prevented a successful intercept.

http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=16140

Ballistic Missile Defense: Ground-Midcourse Intercept Test Fails (July 5, 2013)

The first intercept test of the GMD national missile defense system since December 2010 has failed to achieve an intercept.  The test was designated FTG-07, reviving the designation of an earlier cancelled intercept test (see the end of this post).  The last successful intercept test of the GMD system was FTG-05, conducted on December 5, 2008.

The primary stated purpose of FTG-07 was to test the many changes that have been made to the GBI interceptor since it was deployed.  Ten of the thirty deployed interceptors are a new version of the GBI using the new CE-II version of the kill vehicle.  However, these ten interceptors are not considered operational, because the CE-II version of the GBI failed in both of its intercept tests.

The other twenty deployed GBIs are older interceptors using the original CE-I version of the kill vehicle.  It was a refurbished version of the CE-I GBI that was tested today.

Although the three previous intercept tests (in 2006, 2007, and 2008) of this CE-I version of the GBI have all been described by the MDA as successful, many problems with these interceptors have been discovered.  According the GAO, as of 2011:  “all GMD flight tests have revealed issues that led to either a hardware or software change to the ground-based interceptors.”[1]  Accordingly, in 2007, MDA began a program to refurbish the older, already deployed CE-I GBIs.  [The deployment of 24 CE-I interceptors was completed in FY 2007.  Four of them were subsequently replaced by CE-II interceptors.]  This refurbishment program, which the GAO has estimated will cost between $14 and $24 million per interceptor, is still ongoing.[2]  According to MDA Director Vice Admiral James Syring, FTG-07 would test out 24 or 25 “improvements” to the CE-I GBI.[3]

In addition, this test has been described as using a “complex” target.  It is unclear exactly what this means, but it may indicate that that this was the fourth attempt to intercept a target using “countermeasures.”  (In the previous three attempts, the decoys failed to deploy in one test, and the interceptor failed in the other two).

Bottom Line: Although we need to wait for details, this test failure may pose a particular problem for GMD advocates.  In recent years, when asked about whether or not the GMD system could be relied on to be effective, the standard MDA reply has been that although the two most recent intercept tests had failed, these were of the new CE-II GBIs, and the older GBIs could still be relied on.

For example, here is part of Admiral Syring’s response to a question during his most recent Congressional testimony:[4]

ADM. SYRING:  “Let me take that, and then maybe, sir, I’ll cede some time to Dr. Gilmore.  The systems we have today work.  And I’ll keep — I’ll keep it that simple.  The older systems, which we call the CE1 interceptors, have been successfully flight tested three out of three times.

The problem that we’ve had recently with the newer interceptor — and those failures both occurring in 2010 — and that’s the flight test that I — that I spoke about in terms of the January fix was flown in a nonintercept flight and then we’ll fly later this year in an intercept flight to validate the performance of the new kill vehicle.”

The failure of FTG-07 could put a serious dent in that argument.

Historical Note:  The original FTG-07 (see figure below) was planned as a two-stage GBI intercept test against an IRBM target, and as of June 2009, it was scheduled for 4Q of FY 2010.  The target launch was to be from Kodiak, rather than Kwajalein.  However, after the failure of FTG-06, this test was cancelled in order to conduct FTG-06a

Henri K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ces échecs confirment ce qui a pu être dit ailleurs, notamment sur le fil icbm sol-sol.

Enooormément d'eau va encore couler sous les ponts avant que ces systèmes ABM ne puissent envisager d'intercepter autre chose que des engins hyper rustiques.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ces échecs confirment ce qui a pu être dit ailleurs, notamment sur le fil icbm sol-sol.

Enooormément d'eau va encore couler sous les ponts avant que ces systèmes ABM ne puissent envisager d'intercepter autre chose que des engins hyper rustiques.

C'était le point de vue de Stratège qui pensait que les systèmes ABM ne deviendraient matures (et abordables en conséquence) qu'après 2020 et des brouettes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ces échecs confirment ce qui a pu être dit ailleurs, notamment sur le fil icbm sol-sol.

Enooormément d'eau va encore couler sous les ponts avant que ces systèmes ABM ne puissent envisager d'intercepter autre chose que des engins hyper rustiques.

Tout à fait.

Mais ce qu'il faut retenir est que, pour moi, ABM est une prochaine arme stratégique, comme dans les années 40. Qui ose et peut l'investir dès aujourd'hui récoltera des fruits plus rapidement que les autres demain.

C'est une arme des "grands voyous", ça va peser sur la table de négociation géopolitique de "qui a la plus grosse".

Henri K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tout à fait.

Mais ce qu'il faut retenir est que, pour moi, ABM est une prochaine arme stratégique, comme dans les années 40. Qui ose et peut l'investir dès aujourd'hui récoltera des fruits plus rapidement que les autres demain.

C'est une arme des "grands voyous", ça va peser sur la table de négociation géopolitique de "qui a la plus grosse".

Henri K.

Pour moi c'est plus une arme de faux-amis, destinée à "entourlouper" ses alliés (et bluffer ses ennemis), un peu comme le f35.

Technologiquement, l'abm souffre de tares congénitales qui font que, selon moi, il sera toujours en retard par rapport aux icbm (utilisant grossièrement les mêmes techno en matière de propulsion, il aura toujours un temps de retard qui rendra (quasi)impossible une interception en boost-phase. Pour ce qui est du mid-course, la facilité de faire des leurres alliée aux difficultés de discrimination, font qu'il faudrait tirer un grand nombre d'abm pour espérer d'intercepter la cargaison d'un seul icbm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pour vous donner une idée à quoi ressemble un GBI, c'est celui qui a servi pour l'essai de Septembre 2007. C'est celui de la version 3 étages de Boeing.

Image IPB

Il existe une autre version de 2 étages de LM.

Henri K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Que ce soit en surface ou enterré cela ne change pas grand chose:

1) sans radar les missiles ne servent à rien, et le radar on ne peut pas l'enterrer et probablement pas le rendre mobile (le système de radar doit être proche de celui installé sur les destroyers/croiseurs AEGIS…)

2) les silos semblent être très proches (voir identiques ?) des silos Mk.41 embarqués sur les destroyers US, donc enterré ou non, ils seront vulnérables à des attaques par des bombes. Pour résoudre le problème, il faudrait concevoir des silos équipés d'une porte blindée aussi bien protégée que celle des silos d'ICBM, ce qui a un coût énorme (il faudrait aussi revalider le lancement des missiles, voir modifier les missiles pour les adapter aux nouveaux lanceurs), pour un gain pas forcément évident vu que le radar sera de toute façon vulnérable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  Ils n'auraient pas + vite fait a revenir sur l'idée du laser/maser des années 80 du programme star wars mais en parlant d'un dispositif de tir uniquement au sol cette fois ? La raison qui a fait qu'on a pas vraiment développé fut la difficulté a construire des lasers assez puissants pour traverser une grande distance dans l'atmosphère sans avoir perdu de trop en intensité pour induire suffisamment de mégajoules/s sur la surface de l'engin visé ... Et avec un laser en continu et non basé sur des impulsions ultra courtes comme ceux avec lesquels on bosse aujourd'hui

  Le problème étant la disponibilité techno des lasers en eux même non ? Une fois monté sur un dispositif téléopéré et avec les mêmes radar utilisé en ABM, cela ne devrait être que formalité pour que le faisceau acquiert la cible, le problème après est d'y induire suffisamment de Joules pour la mettre aware

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Les missiles prévus sur le site roumain (entrée en service programmée pour 2015-2018) sont des sm3 blockIb, une version améliorée des blockIa embarqués sur les navires. Ils ont les même dimensions. Par contre sur le site polonais (entrée en service en 2018-2020) ça devrait être des blockII qui sont plus gros.

Il y a eu plusieurs rapports et évaluations récentes (un peu contradictoires entre eux même mais pas trop) qui font que la suite des déploiement ABM ne sera peut-être pas celle qui était initialement prévue. Ces rapports enterrent les interceptions en boost-phase et conseillent de miser sur la phase mid-course pour les interceptions.

Dans tous les cas, l'usage du laser n'est plus retenu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le problème étant la disponibilité techno des lasers en eux même non ?

Le problème est complexe.

Soit on envoie un LASER ultra-puissant mais le faisceau se disperse et fait plusieurs mètres de diamètre lorsqu'il arrive sur la cible.

Soit on monte une optique adaptative pour focaliser le faisceau sur la cible mais dans ce cas on est limité en puissance d'émission parce que les optiques grillent littéralement si on envoie une intensité trop élevée.

Bref, à moins d'une révolution technologique, les LASER en anti-ballistique c'est de la poudre aux yeux.

Mais ça n'empêche pas certains industriels de (re)vendre l'idée tous les xxx ans aux gouvernements histoire de traire la vache en promettant que "cette fois, ça va marcher, promis, juré".

Pour moi c'est plus une arme de faux-amis, destinée à "entourlouper" ses alliés (et bluffer ses ennemis), un peu comme le f35.

Pour moi, le concept même d'ABM est idiot. Imaginons un intercepteur avec 99% de fiabilité. Face à une frappe nucléaire capable de faire 1 million de victimes, l'espérance (au sens mathématique) du nombre de victime est tout de même de 1%*1million = 10 mille victimes.

Quel gouvernement sera prêt à prendre un tel pari? Aucun et c'est pour ça que la seule utilité d'un dispositif ABM est pour un scénario de première frappe. Ce qui explique l'opposition russe à ce projet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pour moi, le concept même d'ABM est idiot. Imaginons un intercepteur avec 99% de fiabilité. Face à une frappe nucléaire capable de faire 1 million de victimes, l'espérance (au sens mathématique) du nombre de victime est tout de même de 1%*1million = 10 mille victimes.

Quel gouvernement sera prêt à prendre un tel pari? Aucun et c'est pour ça que la seule utilité d'un dispositif ABM est pour un scénario de première frappe. Ce qui explique l'opposition russe à ce projet.

ABM est une 2ème arme de dissuasion au même titre que l'arme nucléaire, ça permet de tirer un grand nombre de développement technologique.

Henri K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Il faut distinguer la défense contre les srbm (voire MRBM) et celle qui concerne les missiles à plus longue portée (irbm-icbm).

La première, souvent destinée à la défense de troupes projetées, se concentre sur la phase terminale de la trajectoire du missile balistique. La vitesse de rentrée étant relativement faible, ça semble jouable, mais ça reste compliquée (les exemples concrets d'utilisation dans des conflits montrant des taux de réussite faibles). Par ailleurs, l'arrivée de missiles manoeuvrants (comme l'iskander russe) ne va pas faciliter cette tâche. Les représentants les plus connus de ces abm sont les patriot, les ss400 voire notre aster 30.

La seconde a un moment caressé le rêve d'une interception en boost-phase (qui présente le grand intérêt de détruire le missile avant qu'il ne déploie ses têtes et les aides à la pénétration (leurres, paillettes...) mais deux rapport récents et sérieux ont montré qu'il fallait abandonner ce rêve (car irréalisable).

Vu que les vitesses de rentées des têtes des missiles à longue portée sont très élevées, l'interception ne peut donc se concentrer que sur la phase de trajectoire dite mid-course. Cette phase présente l'avantage d'être longue ce qui permet de mettre en place des "stratégies" d'interception (sls ou sas proposés par les rapports évoqués). Les abm les plus connus sont les standart sm3, les gbi, les thaad et peut-être, demain, l'exoguard.

Cependant, l'interception en mid-course est elle aussi pratiquement irréalisable contre des missiles usant de contre-mesures (leurres...). Les moyens permettant une discrimination suffisante n'existent tout simplement pas.

Nonobstant, bien que très (trop) compliquée, le déploiement de tels systèmes abm est de nature à tendre les relations entre les grandes puissance.

C'est pourquoi je complète ce que j'ai dit plus haut : l'abm (hors abm du théatre) n'est pas seulement destinée à entourlouper et bluffer, c'est aussi un danger plus grand que le mal qu'il est sensé combattre.

Pourquoi alors, ces programmes se poursuivent-ils ? Il semble que beaucoup des "contractors" choisis pour construire cette défense abm sont très proches de membres influents du congrès us... :-X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nouveau texte parlant du caractère illusoire de la défense abm telle que conçue aujourd'hui :

http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/07/16/lets-end-bogus-missile-defense-testing/

Les principaux griefs sont qu'il n'y a jamais eu de test représentatif des conditions d'engagement réelles (donc les rares succès ne montrent pas l'efficacité de la défense) et, surtout, le problème de discrimination (tn/leurres) semble insoluble.

Donc, à ce jour, les us galèrent pour intercepter un objet dont ils connaissent les caractéristiques physiques ainsi que le moment du lancement et la trajectoire.... L'interception d'un objet inconnu lancé inopinément, sur une trajectoire non prévue et accompagné de leurres n'est pas pour demain, ni après demain. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Une multitude de satellites sert précisément à surveiller la planète pour détecter le tir d'un tel missile et en déterminer la trajectoire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Une multitude de satellites sert précisément à surveiller la planète pour détecter le tir d'un tel missile et en déterminer la trajectoire.

Et alors ?

Ces satellites existent mais ils servent surtout à faire de l'alerte avancée (et un petit peu de trajectographie). Le calcul de trajectoire est surtout fait par les radars terrestres en bande x notamment.

Cela n'enlève rien au fait que pour les test des missiles abm, ceux qui tirent les missiles ciblent communiquent avec les lanceurs d'abm, avant, et pendant le tir. Notons aussi que les représentants des "contractors" sont (omni)présents lors de ces tests ! :happy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben alors ça contredit légèrement ta conclusion.

:rolleyes: Peux-tu développer ?

Je constate le taux de réussite lamentable des test d'abm malgré des conditions extrêmement favorables (connaissance préalable de l'heure de tir, de la trajectoire...) et que le problème de la discrimination cible/leurre reste entier. J'en conclue donc que l'interception de cible en condition réelle n'est pas pour aujourd'hui ni pour demain (je parle des interception en mid-course). En quoi le fait que des satellites participent aux tentatives d'interception "contredit la conclusion" ??

Quelle est donc ta conclusion ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nouveau texte parlant du caractère illusoire de la défense abm telle que conçue aujourd'hui :

http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2013/07/16/lets-end-bogus-missile-defense-testing/

Les principaux griefs sont qu'il n'y a jamais eu de test représentatif des conditions d'engagement réelles (donc les rares succès ne montrent pas l'efficacité de la défense) et, surtout, le problème de discrimination (tn/leurres) semble insoluble.

Donc, à ce jour, les us galèrent pour intercepter un objet dont ils connaissent les caractéristiques physiques ainsi que le moment du lancement et la trajectoire.... L'interception d'un objet inconnu lancé inopinément, sur une trajectoire non prévue et accompagné de leurres n'est pas pour demain, ni après demain. 

Vaut mieux un système imparfait et opérationnelle que soit rien du tout ou parfait mais trop tard.... Car qui sait prédire les conneries qui peuvent arrivées (genre un groupe ou pays décide d'envoyer un missile soit d'un plate forme mobile genre cargo)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Member Statistics

    5,499
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    creek
    Newest Member
    creek
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    20,873
    Total Topics
    1,310,831
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    3
    Total Blogs
    2
    Total Entries