Serge

[Blindés] Le programme de véhicules aéro-largables

Recommended Posts

J'ai l'impression que pour mettre 9 gusses dans un DAGOR il faut monter un numero de cirque, parce qu'on voit seulement 4 sieges...? Enfin l'engin fait plutot pataud, par contre le ltatv a l'air pas mal du tout dans le genre qui passe partout.

 

Il y a deux banquettes longitudinales a l’arrière. C'est plutôt le mitrailleur sur sa sellette qui fait un numéro de cirque.

 

Polaris-Dagor-2014.jpg

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

C'était prévisible. Avec le programme MPFBAE ressort comme char aéro largable à AUSA le XM8 :CQqVwGiW8AAmMaJ.jpe

20 ans après l'annulation du XM8, c'est intéressant. 

Modifié par Serge
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

C'était prévisible. Avec le programme MPFBAE ressort comme char aéro largable à AUSA le XM8 :

20 ans après l'annulation du XM8, c'est intéressant. 

 

Il n'a pas prit une ride, il a bien été conservé.

Les chenilles souples sont plus que pertinentes.

 

Je l'avais aperçu il n'y a pas si longtemps que ça :

 

1444246906-m8-buford-bae-system.jpg

 

Modifié par Sovngard
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Cette photo ne vient-elle pas d'un MDM ? Il y a 4 ans environ. Peut être d'un AUSA, comme action de lobbying flairant qu'il manquait des cannons dans l'Army.

Pour les chenilles souples, on en a vu sur le standard Thunderbolt. 

thunderbolt02tn.jpg

Pour le XM8, je ne vois pas beaucoup de changement. Je suis surtout surpris que le surblindage n'ait pas changé.

Si le concept est bon, il mériterait d'être (peut être) remis au gout du jour. Si tant est qu'il soit dépassé. 

Pour donner une idée, la première modification que je ferais serait de monter la 12,7 en coaxiale.

Modifié par Serge

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Cette photo ne vient-elle pas d'un MDM ? Il y a 4 ans environ. Peut être d'un AUSA, comme action de lobbying flairant qu'il manquait des cannons dans l'Army.

 

Army Maneuver Conference 2013

 

 

Pour les chenilles souples, on en a vu sur le standard Thunderbolt. 

thunderbolt02tn.jpg

 

 

Je me demande ce qu'il est advenu de celui-là.

 

 

Modifié par Sovngard

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Je me demande ce qu'il est devenu celui-là.

Je pense que c'est celui qui a servi aux études sur le XM-291. Non ?

Sinon, BAE continue sur sa com pour AUSA.CQvc9_WUsAAR52G.jpe

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Je pense que c'est celui qui a servi aux études sur le XM-291. Non ?

 

 

Le développement du XM291 ATAC est antérieur au démonstrateur Thunderbolt.

United Defense Industries a été racheté par BAE Land Systems en 2005 et l'année suivante, le Thunderbolt faisait son apparition au salon Asian Aerospace sous le nom d' AGS 120.

 

1444329348-ags-120-thunderbolt.jpg

1444329346-ags-120-thunderbolt-2.jpg

 

Modifié par Sovngard
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Le message de BAE ne souffre d'aucune ambiguïté :

12113373_911460995556758_377614081456171

BAE Systems, Inc.
The Expeditionary Light Tank is a solution to meet the U.S. Army’s proposed requirement for a Mobile Protected Firepower capability. The solution could be air-dropped from a C-130 aircraft and is based on the purpose-built M8 Armored Gun System, modernized with mature technologies from the CV90 family of infantry fighting vehicles and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

 

Modifié par Serge

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

AUSA 2015: BAE light tank goes back to the future

12th October 2015 - 19:37 by Grant Turnbull in Washington DC 

3cc35220.jpg

A two decade-old light tank design is being displayed by BAE Systems at the AUSA exhibition that it says could meet the US Army’s future mobile protected firepower (MPF) requirement.

Going against the general industry convention of releasing new technologies at trade shows, BAE Systems has a M8 Armoured Gun System (AGS) prototype built in the 1990s on its stand.

The company is even showing the original promotional video made in that period on a TV screen next to the vehicle. Sometimes old ideas are the best.

The M8 was selected to equip the 82nd Airborne Division in 1992 but was subsequently cancelled in 1997. Though there was some interest overseas, the M8 never achieved success and only six prototypes were built.

But the requirement for a light tank has never gone away and the US Army has just released a new request for information for a MPF vehicle, according to industry sources.

Explaining the decision to display the vehicle, BAE Systems’ director of new and amphibious vehicles, Deepak Bazaz said it was designed to stir debate about the army’s future requirements for a light tank capability.

‘What we are trying to do here is start the conversation, because the requirements haven’t solidified for MPF,’ Bazaz told Shephard. ‘We don’t want to put in a bunch of technologies and have someone say “that’s not quite what I’m looking for”.’

The M8 has shared components with the M1 Abrams MBT and Bradley IFV, meaning that technology from the modernisation of those vehicles could be transferred to the light tank platform.

‘All those platforms are still in the fleet today so what have they done to modernise their systems?’ said Bazaz.

Some technologies that could be integrated onto the platform include a situational awareness package and a digital architecture to aid with future sensor integration and networked operations.

A lightweight rubber band track derived from the company’s CV90 IFV has already been fitted, which ‘drops a significant amount of weight,’ according to Bazaz.

The platform on display features a soft recoil 105mm gun turret – which houses the gunner and commander – with a 21-round magazine capable of firing 12 rounds a minute. The gun also features an autoload capability.

Powered by a Detroit Diesel 580hp powerpack, the M8 can achieve 45mph on-road and around 30mph off-road.

With Level 1 armour the vehicle weighs around 30,000lb but that increases to 50,000lb with additional armour, such as armour boxes that can be fitted to the sides. In its Level 1 configuration, a single M8 can be transported in a C-130 and three can be transported in a C-17.

BAE Systems said it would be capable of providing a prototype to the army 18 months after a contract award. There could also be additional opportunities for the M8 as well, including exports.

‘Our target is the US Army, but that opens up other markets as well,’ said Bazaz.

Modifié par Serge

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

With Russia in mind, BAE revives light tank from the ’90s 

October 12, 2015 By Marcus Weisgerber 


U.S. military brass say Russia is the top threat, so companies are pitching arms for a new European battlefield…even if there is no money to buy them.

As the Army steps up the complexity of its combat training, companies are looking at new, futuristic arms tailored for high-end war with Russia and China. But some old ideas are being revived as well.

That’s how a small tank, built and tested in the 1990s, found its way back to the exhibit hall at the largest military trade show in the United States.

“The intent of what we have out here is a conversation starter,” said Deepak Bazaz, BAE Systems’ director of New and Amphibious Vehicles, standing by his company’s M8 Armored Gun System.

Army leaders of yesteryear envisioned a tank that could be dropped onto the battlefield by a C-130 cargo plane. Now Army brass is considering a fleet of lighter, more agile vehicles that could reach the battlefield faster, from the sky instead of from ships.

The Army does not a formal requirement yet for what it calls a mobile protected firepower unit, but it could soon, prompting BAE to bring the unit to the Association of the U.S. Army annual gathering in Washington.

The Army suspended work on a similar project in the mid-1990s, “but the need really remains,” Bazaz said. “It’s emerging again with the changing world that we live in.”

Next to the tank, a flat-screen television played grainy two-decade-old video clips. Unlike armored vehicles and tanks now on the battlefield, the light tank here has no bells and whistles yet. The plan is to put modern electronics and sensor gear on after the Army figures out what it wants.

“There’s a lot of interest that’s starting to form,” Bazaz said. The “82nd Airborne still sees this as a very valid requirement that has remained unmet.”

The tank essentially would replace soldiers on the battlefield. It could destroy enemy tanks or larger vehicles that can withstand handheld weapons.

“The intent would be to drop this behind enemy lines to take an airfield,” Bazaz said. “[Then] you could start bringing in your heavier equipment.”

The Army practiced this type of combat assault of a guarded airfield during a major exercise at the National Training Center in August.

BAE built six of these tanks back in the ’90s. They all still exist, but the condition of each prototype varies with the testing they received. Some have been dropped from cranes, others C-130s to make sure they could withstand the force of an airdrop.

The new tank, the M8, is similar to the Sheridan tanks that the Army used in the Vietnam War.

The tracked tank sports a 105-millimeter cannon, carries a three-man crew, and weighs 35,000 pounds. With additional armor, its weight can pass 50,000 pounds. It can speed along at 45 miles per hour. One can fit in a C-130 airlifter; three can fit inside a larger C-17.

Company officials say more modern equipment could reduce the tank’s weight. For example, the M8 has an older-model 500-horsepower Detroit Diesel engine. A more modern engine could free up hundreds or even a thousand pounds, Bazaz said.

The Army has asked companies how they could fill its needs for a light tank. But whether it could afford the project is a different story.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Le M8 a plusieurs niveaux de blindage.

En Level-1, il est aéro-largable et fait environ 19t. Sa protection serait contre du 7,62 perfo et de la 12,7 de face. Cette configuration serait celle de la phase d'assaut à proprement parlé.

1458677.jpg?d41d

En Level-2, il reçoit des plaques de sur-blindage avec inserts en titan. Je ne sais pas s'il reste aéro-largable. On peut encore faire du posé d'assaut. 

Enfin, en Level-3, l'équipage monte un blindage réactif. Il fait alors 25t et est protégé contre les roquettes. Dans ce cas, une fois la phase d'assaut finie, les kits arrivent sur palette et sont montés. 

m8-ags-asodi-6.jpg

Dans l'esprit, le Level-3 est l'usage courant. Il passe en Level-1 uniquement pour une OAP.

Modifié par Serge
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Merci pour les infos. On peut donc avoir un engin protégé contre les roquettes, monté d'un canon de gros calibre pour un poids contenu.

Modifié par Rémy

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Tout à fait. Pour 25t sachant que le concept a 25 ans.

Par exemple, les chenilles souples font gagner du poids (250kg ?). Les moteurs sont plus compacts et les blindages plus légers. Les solutions réactives se sont également améliorées. Au total, BAE pourrait gagner 2 à 4 t (Il faudrait en revanche rajouter une clim, des paniers pour les équipements... Une protection mines.)

En revanche, il y a des contre-parties. Il est petit (2,5 m de large mais sans le surblindage des flancs) donc n'a pas beaucoup d'obus (seulement 30). Il a une faible autonomie (500 km). Pas beaucoup de place pour les hommes.

Ceci dit, c'est un exemple qui démontre que l'on peut faire un petit char (aéro-largué, il fait moins de 17t) D'autant qu'il a existé un démonstrateur technologique, le ECD, qui avait une motorisation hybride ultra-compact. Il restait dans le châssis de la place pour 4 hommes. 

Enfin, petit rappel historique, le M8 est une version "durcie" du CCVL. 

Ccvl-1.jpg

Modifié par Serge
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

En revanche, il y a des contre-parties. Il est petit (2,5 m de large mais sans le surblindage des flancs) donc n'a pas beaucoup d'obus (seulement 30). Il a une faible autonomie (500 km). Pas beaucoup de place pour les hommes.

Enfin, petit rappel historique, le M8 est une version "durcie" du CCVL. 

 

Je tenais à souligner que le CCVL de la FMC Corporation embarquait 43 obus de 105 mm (19 dans le convoyeur automatisé en tourelle et 24 dans deux râteliers en caisse) et pesait 21,5 tonnes en ordre de combat.

 

Le modèle fut revu une première fois afin d'atteindre une masse de 16,1 tonnes dans le but de permettre son parachutage depuis un C-130 (17,3 tonnes avec équipage et lot de bord), 19,1 tonnes avec le surblindage rapporté (protection dite de niveau 2), 22,4 tonnes avec les briques de surblindage (protection de niveau 3).

Le nombre d'obus de 105 embarqué diminua à 30, plus que 9 dans la caisse (ces derniers étaient désormais dans une soute, dotée de panneaux anti-explosion) tandis que la capacité du convoyeur passait à 21 obus.

 

La deuxième révision a abouti au premier des 6 prototypes du XM8 (avril 1994), il pèse 16,7 tonnes en ordre de parachutage et 18,05 tonnes en ordre de combat, 19,9 tonnes avec le surblindage rapporté (protection dite de niveau 2) et 23,5 tonnes avec les briques de surblindage (protection de niveau 3).

 

 

Moins connu, le concurrent de Cadillac Gage Textron pour le programme AGS, une version allongée du char léger Stingray mais avec une nouvelle tourelle biplace abritant un convoyeur automatisé dans sa nuque.

Il pesait de 19,9 à 22,4 tonnes en ordre de combat suivant le niveau de protection (niveaux 2 et 3 respectivement).

 

1444936892-cadillac-gage-textron-ags.png

 

 

Modifié par Sovngard
  • Upvote (+1) 2

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Vidéo de présentation de l'Expeditionary Light Tank de BAE à l'AUSA-2015 :

Cette présentation était une Jekils et M Hyde. Coté gauche niveau 1 et côté droit, niveau 3.

Modifié par Serge
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Intéressant. J'y croyais plus vraiment au char aérolargable, mais la comm de BAE le rend plutôt crédible. ça peut permettre de droper un peloton de quelques chars avec le groupement para. Ils fourniront un appui feu et capacité de manœuvre supplémentaire non négligeable juste le temps (moins de 72h ?) de s'emparer et remettre en état la plateforme (aéro)portuaire la plus proche pour faire entrer le gros de la force expéditionnaire avec du matos plus lourd si nécessaire. Evidemment faudrait pas que le GT Para ait a affronté un groupement blindé en face, mais ça c'est l'intérêt de choisir son lieu de largage.

Pour nous qui donnons beaucoup d'importance à l'expéditionnaire et à la capacité à entrer en premier (à défaut d'avoir la masse pour durer), ça pourrait être cohérent d'acheter sur étagère de quoi opérer un escadron. C'est une micro-flotte de plus, mais je la trouverais plutôt justifié.

Par contre, le monsieur de BAE précise qu'ils n'ont droppé leur bébé que deux fois et qu'il a certes effectivement fonctionné correctement les deux fois. Mais si on relance les dès 100 fois, il va être de combien le taux d'échec ? Est-ce qu'il faudra larguer 6 engins pour en avoir 4 opérants ? Seulement 5 ?

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Y a t il une raison fondamentale pour qu'un char conçu pour n'arrive pas a atterrir sans se casser?! Si la DZ est propre a mon sens il n'y a pas de raison que la contrainte de l’atterrissage soit plus compliqué que celle des contrainte de rouler en tout terrain a 50km/h sur un terrain cassant.

On a fait de très gros progrès que les parachute, sur les système d'amortissement etc.

La grande question c'est surtout qui a un véritable besoin de parachuter un char de 17t et pour quoi faire.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Intéressant. J'y croyais plus vraiment au char aérolargable, mais la comm de BAE le rend plutôt crédible.

Il est forcément crédible puisqu'il a été sélectionné par l'US-Army. Le programme a juste été annulé au moment de passer les premières commandes. 

Par contre, le monsieur de BAE précise qu'ils n'ont droppé leur bébé que deux fois et qu'il a certes effectivement fonctionné correctement les deux fois. Mais si on relance les dès 100 fois, il va être de combien le taux d'échec ? Est-ce qu'il faudra larguer 6 engins pour en avoir 4 opérants ? Seulement 5 ?

Il y a eu en effet deux aéro larges. Il faut rajouter à cela les chutes. On lève un M8 avec une grue à deux mètres et on le lâche. Plusieurs fois.

On peut voir l'effet de vieillissement de la structure (état des soudures, apparition de criques...) et la résistance des équipements. 

Y a t il une raison fondamentale pour qu'un char conçu pour n'arrive pas a atterrir sans se casser?! Si la DZ est propre a mon sens il n'y a pas de raison que la contrainte de l’atterrissage soit plus compliqué que celle des contrainte de rouler en tout terrain a 50km/h sur un terrain cassant.

On a fait de très gros progrès que les parachute, sur les système d'amortissement etc.

La grande question c'est surtout qui a un véritable besoin de parachuter un char de 17t et pour quoi faire.

La première contrainte est celle de la masse pour que le char n'arrache pas la rampe arrière au largage.

Une chute est autrement plus violente que du tout terrain. Le choc est massif alors qu'en roulant le train de roulement travaille comme prévu. C'est doux. 

En parallèle, on pensent à l'habitude qu'ont certains à faire sauter les chars. Et bien ça les casse. Les châssis n'aiment pas.

Modifié par Serge
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

 Le programme a juste été annulé au moment de passer les premières commandes.

 

 

Quel était le motif de cette annulation ?

 

 

Modifié par Sovngard

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
Citation

Army to meet with firms interested in developing new light tank

 

M551-Sheridan-777x437.jpg?resize=777%2C4An M551 Sheridan outside the the Vatican's embassy in 1989 during negotiations for Noriega's surrender before the combat vehicle was retired. The Army plans to meet with companies Aug. 9, 2016, to discuss the idea of developing a new light tank. (Photo courtesy of the Center of Military History)

POSTED BY: BRENDAN MCGARRY AUGUST 4, 2016
The U.S. Army plans to meet next week with firms to discuss the idea of developing a new light armored vehicle with mobile protected firepower.

The Army plans to hold a so-called industry day on Tuesday at Fort Benning in Georgia to discuss the requirements for such a vehicle, essentially a light tank, in the areas of lethality, mobility, protection, transportability, sustainability, energy and cyber, according to a statement released on Thursday from the service.

The MPF program “will be a lightweight combat vehicle that provides the Infantry Brigade Combat Team long range, precision direct fire capability that ensures freedom of movement and action during joint expeditionary maneuver and joint combined arms operations,” according to the statement.

Speaking at the event will be Maj. Gen. Eric Wesley, commanding general of the Maneuver Center of Excellence; Lt. Gen. John Murray, deputy chief of staff for programs (G8); Brig. Gen. David Bassett, program executive officer for ground combat systems; and Col. William Nuckols, director of the maneuver requirements division, according to the Army.

The service has been experimenting with ways to bring more firepower to soldiers.

Army officials recently conducted at Benning a live-fire demonstration of 30mm cannons mounted on the Light Armored Vehicle (Combat Reconnaissance Vehicle) and Flyer Advanced Light Strike Vehicle, both of which are made by General Dynamics Corp.

The exercise featured the ground mobility vehicle 1.1 prototype firing the M230-LF 30mm cannon and the light armored vehicle combat reconnaissance vehicle prototype with a Kongsberg turret firing an integrated MK44 30mm cannon.

The Army quietly canceled its Light Reconnaissance Vehicle program in June, opting instead to equip cavalry scout units with the more general-purpose Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, designed to replace a third of the Humvee fleet.

That decision came without notice after maneuver leaders held a two-week vehicle assessment at Benning last August involving six companies as part of a platform demonstration to evaluate prototypes from industry. Instead, the Army will equip scout units in infantry brigade combat teams with JLTVs with potential sensor and lethality upgrades, officials maintain.

–Matthew Cox contributed to this report.

 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Créer un compte ou se connecter pour commenter

Vous devez être membre afin de pouvoir déposer un commentaire

Créer un compte

Créez un compte sur notre communauté. C’est facile !

Créer un nouveau compte

Se connecter

Vous avez déjà un compte ? Connectez-vous ici.

Connectez-vous maintenant


  • Statistiques des membres

    5130
    Total des membres
    1132
    Maximum en ligne
    Kerloas
    Membre le plus récent
    Kerloas
    Inscription
  • Statistiques des forums

    20129
    Total des sujets
    1096208
    Total des messages
  • Statistiques des blogs

    3
    Total des blogs
    2
    Total des billets