Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

F-22


rayak
 Share

Recommended Posts

C'est vrais De plus le FB-22 est très grand et sur un PA ca le ferrait pas trop Cependant si il est contruit le FB-22 risque d'être le meilleur bombardier car sont nivaux de furtivité doit être exeptionelle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1)je comprendrais jamais les américains...ils créent un F22 uniquement comme chasseur alors qu'ils savent bien que l'époque des avions qui n'ont qu'une misison est finie et ensuite dépensent encore plus d'argent pour le retransformer...et le faire devenir multirôle 2) Les US commendent des dizaines de Super-hornet en sachant pertinament qu'il sera remplacé dnas moins de 10 ans par le F35 marine... 3) Le tomcat qui revient en tant que bombardier...c'est de l'US tout craché...a quand le Mustang larguant des GBU12 ??? ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

C'est vrais

De plus le FB-22 est très grand et sur un PA ca le ferrait pas trop

Cependant si il est contruit le FB-22 risque d'être le meilleur bombardier car sont nivaux de furtivité doit être exeptionelle

ouais enfin s ils font un bombardier juste pour sa furtivité je vois pas a quoi ca servirait sachant que la furtivité est une notion toute relative......

ca me ferait bien rire que le F22 soit furtif pour nos radars....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1)je comprendrais jamais les américains...ils créent un F22 uniquement comme chasseur alors qu'ils savent bien que l'époque des avions qui n'ont qu'une misison est finie et ensuite dépensent encore plus d'argent pour le retransformer...et le faire devenir multirôle

2) Les US commendent des dizaines de Super-hornet en sachant pertinament qu'il sera remplacé dnas moins de 10 ans par le F35 marine...

3) Le tomcat qui revient en tant que bombardier...c'est de l'US tout craché...a quand le Mustang larguant des GBU12 ???

;)

Le F22 peut aussi faire camionnette à bombe ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1)je comprendrais jamais les américains...ils créent un F22 uniquement comme chasseur alors qu'ils savent bien que l'époque des avions qui n'ont qu'une misison est finie et ensuite dépensent encore plus d'argent pour le retransformer...et le faire devenir multirôle

Je crois que le programme est "tres vieux". Debut avant la chute de l'Union Sovietique donc pour l'epoque un pur chasseur qu'il fallais

Link to comment
Share on other sites

EN fait, je trouce qu'il vaut mille fois mieux posé des questions "Niaiseuses" que de dire des niaiserie, comme par exemple......qu'un 737 n'est pas un avions...mais un JET.....un avion c'est à hélice....et que si il y a un réacteur....c'est un jet :rolleyes: Tu a entendu pire ?:lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

le F/B 22 était un projet de "bombardier moyen" basé sur un F 22 agrandi pour avoir une soute plus grande tout en gardant à peu pret les caracteristiques du F 22.

Image IPB

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/fb-22.htm

le F22 est le F/A 22, durant la mise au point il y a tout simplement eu l'ajout de capacité air sol donnant le A en plus.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Les Américains espèrent sauver le F-22 avec le FB-22(Très risqué) en faisant une version bombardier dérivé du F-22(En espérant que le cout de développement ne sera pas trop élevé) l'USAF espère pouvoir commandé suffissament élevé(Genre 750exemplaires) pour faire baisser le prix unitaire global. Comme je dis c'est très risquer, Quitte ou double :-\

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Les Américains espèrent sauver le F-22 avec le FB-22(Très risqué) en faisant une version bombardier dérivé du F-22(En espérant que le cout de développement ne sera pas trop élevé) l'USAF espère pouvoir commandé suffissament élevé(Genre 750exemplaires) pour faire baisser le prix unitaire global.

Je pense qu'ils ne pourront même pas s'en acheter plus de 200.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

J'ai trouvé un article très intéressant sur le F-22 (attention fous rires garantis [08])

OPINION - The F-22: not what we were hoping for

The F-22 fighter aircraft's focus on stealth brings big disadvantages in cost, weight and manoeuvrability, argue Pierre Sprey and James Stevenson

For decades, the US Air Force has pushed the F-22 as its fighter for the 21st century. Advocates tout its technical features: fuel-efficient, high-speed 'super-cruise'; advanced electronics; and reduced profile against enemy sensors, known as 'stealth'.

However, on measures that determine winning or losing in air combat, the F-22 fails to improve the US fighter force. In fact, it degrades our combat capability.

Careful examination of actual air-to-air battles tells us that there are five attributes that make a winning fighter. These attributes shaped the F-15 and the F-16.

They are: (1) pilot training and ability; (2) obtaining the first sighting and surprising the enemy; (3) outnumbering enemy fighters in the air; (4) outmanoeuvring enemy fighters to gain a firing position; and (5) consistently converting split-second firing opportunities into kills.

The F-22 is a mediocrity, at best, on (4) and (5). It is a liability on (1), (2) and (3).

The most important attribute - pilot quality - dwarfs the others. Air combat history from both small and large wars makes that obvious. After the Israel Air Force (IAF) swept Syrian MiGs from the sky in Israel's 1982 invasion of Lebanon with an 82-0 exchange ratio, the IAF Chief of Staff told US congressional staffers that the result would have been the same had the Syrian and Israeli pilots switched aircraft.

Great pilots get that way by constant dogfight training. Between 1975 and 1980, at the Navy Fighter Weapons School ('Topgun'), instructor pilots got 40 to 60 hours of air combat manoeuvring per month. Their students came from squadrons getting only 14 to 20 hours per month. Flying the cheap, simple F-5, the robustly trained instructors consistently whipped the students in their 'more capable' F-4 Phantoms, F-14 Tomcats and F-15 Eagles. Today, partly thanks to the pressure on the air force's training budget from the F-22's excessive purchase and operating costs, an F-22 pilot gets 12 to 14 hours of flight training per month. For winning future air battles, this is a huge step backward.

For half a century, the air force has been attempting to get the jump on enemy fighters through expensive, complex technology.

Billions of dollars were spent trying to perfect long-range radar missiles to achieve 'beyond-visual-range' (BVR) kills. Extraordinary kill rates, as high as 80 to 90 per cent, were promised when projects were being sold. Success rates in actual combat were below 10 per cent. Simple, more agile, shorter-range infra-red missiles and guns were far more successful and effective.

Worse, the 'identification friend or foe' (IFF) systems that must distinguish enemies from friends before launching BVR missiles failed in every war. As recently as Operation 'Iraqi Freedom' in 2003, misidentified allied aircraft were lost to US systems. The air force now tells us the only way to get the jump on enemy fighters supposedly launching BVR missiles is with stealth. But stealth solves neither the problem of less effective, high-cost BVR radar missiles nor the IFF conundrum. Moreover, stealth has failed to make our fighters invisible to radar and it brings crippling disadvantages.

In Operation 'Desert Storm' in 1991, according to the Government Accountability Office, so-called stealthy F-117s were significantly less effective bombers than the air force described publicly - there is anecdotal evidence that ancient Iraqi radars detected them. In the war against Serbia in 1999, non-stealthy F-16s had a lower loss rate per sortie than the F-117s. The F-22 will not be invisible to radar in real combat, where it cannot control detection angles and radar types.

The most obvious disadvantage stealth brings to the F-22 is extraordinary cost; it grossly reduces the numbers we will buy. New Department of Defense data shows the total unit cost of the F-22 has grown from about USD130 million to over USD350 million per aircraft. Result? The original buy of 750 is now down to 185.

Moreover, stealth plus the F-22's complexity result in unprecedented levels of maintenance downtime. That further reduces numbers in the air; 185 F-22s will support about 120 deployed fighters. They will be lucky to generate 60 combat sorties per day: a laughable number in any serious air war. In World War II, the Luftwaffe could field only 70 of its revolutionary jet: the Me-262. It caused alarm among Allied pilots but had negligible effect on the air battle.

Furthermore, the stealth requirement adds significant drag, weight and size. Size is the most crippling. Why? Because real-world combat is visual combat. Because the F-22 is much bigger than most fighters, it will be detected first, reversing the theoretical advantage it derives from stealth. Topgun had a saying: "The biggest target in the sky is always the first to die."

Once seen, the F-22 has trouble outman-oeuvring the enemy. Its weight hurts the key performance measures of turning and accelerating. Put simply, both the F-15A and F-16A out-turn and out-accelerate the F-22.

Finally, stealth harms the F-22's quick-firing ability. To retain stealth, the gun and missiles must be buried behind doors that take too long to open to exploit instantaneous opportunities.

The air force will argue strenuously that we are wrong and the F-22 has excelled in air-to-air exercises against all comers. However, our information is that these are 'canned' engagements in which the F-22 is pitted against opponents in joust-like scenarios set up to exploit the F-22's theoretical advantages and exclude its real-world vulnerabilities.

There is a way to find out who is right. A serious test of F-22 capabilities would pit it against pilots and aircraft the air force does not control using rules of engagement dictated by combat and the ratio of F-22s to enemies that the tiny F-22 inventory should expect in hostile skies.

We both would be delighted to observe any such realistic exercises and to report back to this magazine. Nothing would please us more than to find that we are wrong and US fighter pilots have been given the best fighter in the sky.

Pierre Sprey was one of three designers who conceived and shaped the F-16; he also led the technical side of the US Air Force's A-10 design concept team. James Stevenson is former editor of the Navy Fighter Weapons School's Topgun Journal and author of The Pentagon Paradox and The $5 Billion Misunderstanding. This article is adapted from a briefing they produced for the Straus Military Reform Project of the Center for Defense Information.

source

[29][30]

Perso j'ajouterais que sur le point 3 le F-22 est le plus mauvais de tous les chasseurs (ben oui c'est le plus cher, donc peu d'avions).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

et vu le prix probable du F-35, ce sera le même problème. Il est assez gros, ressemble beaucoup au F-22 donc risque d'être tout aussi peu maniable, coutera très cher, aura aussi le problème des soutes (avec en plus une capacité de uniquement 4 missiles (en interne) il me semble...)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bienvenue pour ce nouveau numéro sur les (més)aventures du F-22 [50]

Aujourd'hui, parlons maintenance.

Image IPB

Pour garder sa furtivité, la maintenance doit être irréprochable, hors là on voit déjà des laissez-allez sur des avions tout neufs [09]

J'ose même pas imaginer ce que ça sera dans dix ans, en OPEX.

Adieux furtivité [21] [12]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Effectivement je commence à douter séreusement que le F-22 est le meilleur avions de chasse du monde car c'est un peux vit dit Le F-22 doit être traiter comme un bijoux c'est un peux comme un mouvement d'oglogerie un grain de sable dedant et hop plus rien ne marche Vu le prix qu'il coute et l'entretien qu'il demande et tout les petit détaille qui ne doivent pas être négliger sinon rien ne marche il n'oseront jamais les faire sortire du pays leur diamant F-22 Certe c'est le meilleur avions au monde mais si la logistique qu'il y à dérière ne suit pas cette avions va au devant de grave problème Et il doit être orriblement chère à entretenire vu le nombre de personnel qu'il exige pour marcher

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,982
    Total Members
    1,749
    Most Online
    Personne
    Newest Member
    Personne
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.5k
    Total Topics
    1.7m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...