Recommended Posts

On Base: Testing and Maintaining the F-35 at the PAX ITF

NAS Patuxent River, Maryland // March 27, 2015

 

brittany-news-2__main.jpg
 

A 5th Generation fighter jet like the F-35 cannot begin to help secure our skies without first being pushed to its limits in rigorous testing. This means putting the Lightning II through scorching heat, frigid cold, hard-impact landings on the decks of aircraft carriers and careful touchdowns on wet runways.

Throughout the vast array of tests, engineers at Naval Air Station Patuxent River (PAX) Integrated Test Force (ITF) in Maryland constantly monitor each part of the jet to ensure that all of the systems work together as they should. Brittany, an early career engineer, is one of the many engineers supporting flight test activities at PAX.

Brittany’s role in flight test heavily focuses on monitoring and improving how the F-35 engine and lift fan interface with the rest of the aircraft. The Pratt & Whitney engine—capable of generating up to 40,000 pounds of thrust—creates heat as a by-product of its power. As it is carefully nestled in the back of the jet and immediately surrounded by critical hardware, Brittany must constantly monitor the area during testing and ensure all thermal readings are within normal limits. On the B variant, she also helps verify that the drive shaft—which spins the lift fan—is functioning properly.

Brittany’s daily work on these integral elements of the jet allow her to have a unique hand in the success of every F-35 Lightning II that she and the PAX team test. Each time they encounter an unexpected result or challenge, Brittany and the flight test team must innovate and adjust their approach to problem-solve in real time.
“I know for every test point we complete, we are constantly expanding the envelope of what the fleet can do with this aircraft,” she offers.
 

From Land to Sea

With plans for the F-35 to fly in the diverse environmental homes of our international partners around world, testing of the aircraft is robust and covers every possible flight scenario. During her time at PAX, Brittany has had the opportunity to support three separate flight test detachments: the F-35B Developmental Test-2 (DT-2) aboard the USS Wasp, F-35B wet runway and crosswind testing at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) and most recently, F-35B climatic testing at Eglin AFB.
“Supporting these detachments is one of my favorite parts of the job,” she offers with a smile. “It helps me shake it up a bit and gain new, valuable experiences.”

Brittany’s three-week detachment to the USS Wasp for the second F-35B sea trials was by far her most unforgettable experience as a flight test engineer.

“Working aboard a carrier for three weeks was a once in-a-lifetime opportunity,” she reflects. ”Looking back on it now it almost feels unreal—we were standing on deck not far from the aircraft, watching short takeoffs (STOs) and vertical landings (VLs). I feel incredibly lucky to have had that experience.”

Brittany has also had her fair share of supporting various program firsts from the control room. She helped monitor test points during the first weapons separation, first vertical takeoff (VTO) and the first VL at night, both on land and at sea.

Never a Dull Moment

Brittany never imagined that this was the sort of hands-on work she would be doing just a few years out of school.
“This is not at all what I imagined I would be involved in,” she reveals. “I thought I would be at a desk all day, working on some type of analysis or design for some tiny part. That is certainly a far cry from the dynamic work I do on the aircraft every day now.”

“Dynamic” it certainly is. On a daily basis, Brittany works on everything from supporting flight test in the control room, which includes participating in mission briefs and debriefs, monitoring safety of test parameters and completing post-test activities. She can even find herself troubleshooting a problem on the aircraft, coordinating maintenance and regression activities, updating information on the screens used to monitor the aircraft in the control room, assisting in test planning or supporting an event at the Manned Flight Simulator.

“I actually enjoy not always knowing what the day will bring,” she says.
Brittany and her team constantly rise to the challenge of the unknown. After all, the goal of testing is to see how the aircraft behaves under different conditions and parameters. Any time an unexpected jet behavior occurs, it is the team on-site who must implement a solution in real time—and this is why the work of Brittany, her fellow flight test engineers and truly the whole team is instrumental in the success of the F-35.

For Brittany, it is not only the work that she does, but also the team that she is a part of that makes her experience in flight test so rewarding.

“The team at PAX is an extraordinary team. We are fully capable of pulling together and overcoming the challenging obstacles we face in order to meet program milestones to the best of our abilities—it’s excellent.”   

Modifié par Picdelamirand-oil

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

"Brittany" ; A  se demander si LM n' pas choisi un prénom pour que les anglais, au moment où ils pourraient douter  se sentent encore plus partie prenante dans ce "bordel" ....

Modifié par Zarth Arn
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

F-35 Flies Against F-16 In Basic Fighter Maneuvers

 

https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35-flies-against-f-16-in-basic-fighter-maneuvers


Pilot Completes First F-35 Vertical Landing for Royal Air Force

https://www.f35.com/news/detail/pilot-completes-first-f-35-vertical-landing-for-royal-air-force

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Rockwell Collins’ FireStormTM Targeting System Certified for use with F-35
Edwards AFB, California // April 21, 2015
A current and qualified Forward Air Controller (FAC) from the United Kingdom, using the Rockwell Collins FireStorm Integrated Targeting System, was the first to successfully guide an F-35 Lightning II aircraft digitally using a complete air strike mission thread in both a ground test and live flight.
The flight test was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base, California, F-35 Lightning II flight test facility in coordination with the integrated project team from the U.K. F-35 Office.
firestorm-news__main.jpg
“The FAC approached the test from a practical standpoint and was able to use the system under simulated tactical conditions,” said Tommy Dodson, vice president and general manager of Surface Solutions for Rockwell Collins. “The test was also significant because FireStorm is currently fielded by the British Army, and has now been proven to be interoperable with the F-35.”
The Rockwell Collins FireStorm Integrated Targeting System is a lightweight and modular Joint Fires system that provides proven digital connectivity with virtually all coalition aircraft, field artillery systems and command-and-control center battle managers. FireStorm systems are in operation around the world, and in use by five NATO countries.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Tout dépend de ce qu'on met dedans, si on parle de la cellule seule sans moteur ni soutiens, les 100 millions/pce c'est envisageable quand ils auront figé le design (parce que la faut quand même inclure les coup du refit obligatoire une fois que le design sera enfin figé).

 

Après on est sur un site (www.f35.com) pas franchement neutre dans son approche et qui précise déjà que le moteur n'est pas compté dans ce prix donc bon.

 

C'est combien déjà un F135 ?

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

F135-PW-100 : $13 990 000

F135-PW-600 : $19 030 000

 

Prix 2014 à utiliser officiellement pour chiffrer une destruction ("2014 ENGINE COST DATA FOR AVIATION MISHAP REPORTING"). 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

C'est combien déjà un F135 ?

 

Sur le LRIP 7 (acquisition de 36 unités), ont été versés environ 26,2 millions $ par unité. Sur le LRIP 8 (acquisition de 48 unités), ont été versés environ 21,9 millions $ par unité.

 

A voir le panachage entre -100 et -600.

Modifié par Skw

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

 

 

Tout dépend de ce qu'on met dedans, si on parle de la cellule seule sans moteur ni soutiens, les 100 millions/pce c'est envisageable quand ils auront figé le design (parce que la faut quand même inclure les coup du refit obligatoire une fois que le design sera enfin figé).

 

Après on est sur un site (www.f35.com) pas franchement neutre dans son approche et qui précise déjà que le moteur n'est pas compté dans ce prix donc bon.

 

C'est combien déjà un F135 ?

 

Mais comment peuvent-ils afficher un avion sans le prix du moteur !

Je me vois mal aller chez le concessionnaire et voir le prix d'une voiture sans le moteur !

(Quoi que François l'embrouille l'a déjà fait :) )

 

En effet, aux dernières nouvelles, il me semble que le moteur est obligatoire dans un avion (et même dans une voiture), je peux vous confirmer cela par au moins une centaine de "spécialistes".

 

Si, si je pense être sur de moi, le moteur est bien obligatoire dans un avion. :)

 

Voilà, je pense avoir écrit le post le plus pertinent du topic, voir de tout le forum . :)

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Mais comment peuvent-ils afficher un avion sans le prix du moteur ! Je me vois mal aller chez le concessionnaire et voir le prix d'une voiture sans le moteur ! [...] En effet, aux dernières nouvelles, il me semble que le moteur est obligatoire dans un avion (et même dans une voiture), je peux vous confirmer cela par au moins une centaine de "spécialistes".

 

Ca ne me paraît pas aberrant de présenter le prix de l'avion sans le réacteur, étant donné la gestion logistique que l'on a. On peut très bien, pour s'assurer un meilleur taux de disponibilité, avoir un pool de moteurs totalement découplé du nombre de cellules. Puis la durée de vie des cellules et des réacteurs n'est pas du tout la même. D'un point de vue logistique et gestionnaire, c'est même assez décalé de donner un coût d'achat pour une cellule et un moteur... sachant que cela ne correspond pas aux réalités opérationnelles.

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Mais comment peuvent-ils afficher un avion sans le prix du moteur !

C'est une pratique courante dans l'aéronautique étant donné que ceux qui conçoivent et fabriquent le "planeur" (la cellule) ne sont pas ceux qui fabriquent les moteurs.

Ce qui fait que c'est un F-35 et pas un P-51 c'est la cellule. Le moteur n'est qu'un équipement parmi d'autres, aussi indispensable soit-il.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Ha Ok !

Présenter la chose comme ça me parait cohérent.

Donc la durée de vie des cellules et des réacteurs n'est pas du tout la même.

Ce dernier serait même comparé  à une sorte de "consommable" comme avec les cartouches d'imprimantes.

 

Merci de ton post SKW.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Ca ne me paraît pas aberrant de présenter le prix de l'avion sans le réacteur, étant donné la gestion logistique que l'on a. On peut très bien, pour s'assurer un meilleur taux de disponibilité, avoir un pool de moteurs totalement découplé du nombre de cellules. Puis la durée de vie des cellules et des réacteurs n'est pas du tout la même. D'un point de vue logistique et gestionnaire, c'est même assez décalé de donner un coût d'achat pour une cellule et un moteur... sachant que cela ne correspond pas aux réalités opérationnelles.

Oui mais alors pourquoi ne pas donner le prix de l'avion sans le Radar? La durée de vie du Radar et de la cellule n'ont aucune raison d'être semblables et on peut très bien avoir quelques radar d'avance au cas où.

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Oui mais alors pourquoi ne pas donner le prix de l'avion sans le Radar? La durée de vie du Radar et de la cellule n'ont aucune raison d'être semblables et on peut très bien avoir quelques radar d'avance au cas où.

 

Ton radar n'est pas spécifiquement limité en nombre d'heures de vol. Quand on récupère une nouvelle version du M88 avec une durée de vie allongée, les gestionnaires en tirent tout de suite des conclusions d'un point de vue comptable (entendre cet adjectif d'un point de vue financier et d'un point de vue de gestion du parc). 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

http://www.lemondejuif.info/2013/02/israel-a-t-il-fait-le-bon-choix-pour-le-f-35-americain/

Les F-35 ne sont pas censés être livrés avant 2016, mais l’aviation israélienne doit dès maintenant construire une infrastructure complète, immédiatement opérationnelle lors de la livraison des avions furtifs. Cette construction inclut une base d’où le premier escadron sera exploité, des abris souterrains fortifiés et des équipements de maintenance.

Israël a signé en octobre 2010 un contrat de 2,75 milliards de dollars pour une commande initiale de 19 F-35 et une option pour un deuxième escadron. En fin de compte, Israël Air Force veut 75 F-35, pour un coût de 15,2 milliards de dollars afin de maintenir sa suprématie aérienne au Moyen-Orient au cours des deux prochaines décennies.

 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Sur le LRIP 7 (acquisition de 36 unités), ont été versés environ 26,2 millions $ par unité. Sur le LRIP 8 (acquisition de 48 unités), ont été versés environ 21,9 millions $ par unité.

 

A voir le panachage entre -100 et -600.

F-135%2BUnit%2BCosts.jpg

 

http://bestfighter4canada.blogspot.fr/2015/04/f-35s-engine-troubles.html

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter

The costliest weapons program in U.S. history needed some good news after a string of negative reports by the Government Accountability Office and other watchdogs.

It got a shot in the arm when the GOP-controlled committee rejected by voice vote an amendment from Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) that would have cut its funding.

Speier sought to reduce a $1 billion funding increase proposed by Thornberry by $589 million.

Lockheed Martin, the plane’s manufacturer, circulated a flier to members urging them to vote down the proposal and it paid off.

If the bill becomes law, the defense giant will produce 63 F-35 jets next year, a boost from the 38 it produced this year, according to the House Armed Services Committee.

http://thehill.com/policy/defense/240847-winners-losers-in-612b-defense-bill

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

une fille fille sur F35

 

Trailblazing female Air Force pilot makes history as first woman to fly new F-35 fighter jet
 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3072098/Trailblazing-female-Air-Force-pilot-makes-history-woman-fly-new-F-35-fighter-jet.html

 

Trailblazer: Previously, Mau (second right) served with three other women in the first all-female air mission over Afghanistan in 2011 
 

2869D16200000578-3072098-image-a-51_1431

 

 

554b131c2a8bb.jpg

Modifié par zx

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Créer un compte ou se connecter pour commenter

Vous devez être membre afin de pouvoir déposer un commentaire

Créer un compte

Créez un compte sur notre communauté. C’est facile !

Créer un nouveau compte

Se connecter

Vous avez déjà un compte ? Connectez-vous ici.

Connectez-vous maintenant


  • Statistiques des membres

    5119
    Total des membres
    1132
    Maximum en ligne
    STEPHANE BEGALA
    Membre le plus récent
    STEPHANE BEGALA
    Inscription
  • Statistiques des forums

    20104
    Total des sujets
    1088761
    Total des messages
  • Statistiques des blogs

    3
    Total des blogs
    2
    Total des billets