Sign in to follow this  
Sgt-Eversman

Le STRYKER

Recommended Posts

c'est pas la même philosophie, le VBCI est censé pouvoir suivre les Leclerc, tandis qu'aux USA c'est le Bradley qui rempli ce rôle, le Stryker étant utilisés par des brigades blindées légères dans rôle plus proche de celui du VAB il me semble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pour donner une idée à quoi pourrait ressembler le ''improved'' stryker, voici le LavIII-Lorit qui est opérationnel en Astan avec les forces canadiennes, il aura en commun(si ma théorie que le nouveau stryker empruntera du matos du nouveau standard canadien est juste):

-les sièges anti-mines

-modification bas de châssis blast-proof

-détecteur de tir

-camera 360 degrés

-porte-bagages slat

-nouveau kit céramique

-bouclier baignoire pour tourelle et compartiment arrière pour la sentinelle

etc...

(je mentionne que les modifications visibles sur les photos)

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Image IPB

Vidéo armynews Lav-RWS

http-~~-//www.youtube.com/watch?v=wo8Z5-Cs6O4

Vidéo armynews sur le LavIII-Lorit

http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/land-terre/news-nouvelles/story-reportage-eng.asp?id=4001

Lorit avec ses brouilleurs en Astan(clicker sur l'image pour l'agrandir)

http://www.combatcamera.forces.gc.ca/netpub/server.np?original=15577&site=combatcamera&catalog=photos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.dodbuzz.com/2010/02/10/army-rolls-out-new-stryker/

The Army is working on a new and improved version of its Stryker wheeled vehicle, given the designation Stryker A1, intended to boost its performance with a more powerful engine, beefier transmission and suspension, better brakes as well as adding a new sensor suite, high-tech shot detection and location system, an upgraded communications network and an improved remotely operated weapons turret.

The Army plans to spend $134 million on the upgraded eight-wheeled vehicle in 2011, according to service budget documents, and nearly $880 million over the next five years. The designation A1 is typically added to Army vehicle names as they go through various iterations and improvement packages such as the M1A1 Abrams, the M1A2, etc.

One of the major enhancements to the Stryker A1 will be to lift the vehicle higher off the ground so that it’s better protected against IED blasts. The Stryker has gained a lot of weight since its initial rollout when it was realized that its thin armor, intended to provide protection only up to 12.7mm machine gun rounds and high-explosive fragments, did not provide sufficient protection against the two most omnipresent anti-armor weapons in irregular wars: the IED and the rocket propelled grenade.

To protect against RPGs, the Army added “steel cage” bolt-on slat armor (and then aluminum) around the Stryker’s hull. The cage either deflects or prematurely detonates the rocket’s warhead before it can punch a hole through the hull and into the crew compartment. As IEDs became the insurgent weapon of choice in Iraq, the Army added a 2 inch think belly plate to the Stryker.

The armor packages added nearly 2 ½ tons to the 20 ton Stryker’s weight, severely taxing the engine and transmission and weighing it down. Ground clearance was much reduced. Battlefield experience has shown the importance of getting as much clearance as possible between a vehicle’s belly and the IED or mine blast so that blast effects are absorbed by the suspension and drive train rather than the crew compartment. The vehicle’s off-road mobility was also challenged as it added weight.

These serious teething problems with the relatively new Stryker led retired Army Maj. Gen. Bob Scales to write in Armed Forces Journal that it’s the wrong vehicle for Afghanistan. “The vehicles have proven to be too thinly armored to survive the very large explosive power of Taliban IEDs and too immobile to maneuver off road to avoid them.”

Nevertheless, and despite the fact that the Stryker brigade operating in southern Afghanistan has been pulled off its original mission of clearing an insurgent infested rural area and instead relegated to patrolling hard top roadways, there are plans to convert two of the Army’s heavy brigades to Stryker brigades. Army budget documents say the A1 variant will be designed to solve “current and evolving survivability concerns.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

C'est quand même une armée de rêve sous certaisn aspects.

D'abord, la critique et la remise en cause est admise.

Ensuite quand ca foire, on met les moyens pour corriger et on se cache pas derrière des discours doctrinaires pour justifier la bite et le couteau.

Un officier français m'avait dit un jour un truc du genre "dans l'armée US, tous le monde donne son avis, le chef écoute puis prend une décision et tout le monde s'y tient jusqu'au prochain changement. Dans l'armée française, personne ne moufte, on attend l'opinion du chef qui n'écoute personne, puis dès que la décision est prise, chacun fait à sa façon."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dans l'armée française, personne ne moufte, on attend l'opinion du chef qui n'écoute personne, puis dès que la décision est prise, chacun fait à sa façon."

Au moins en France on est constant, c'est le bordel depuis Astérix ...... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Clairon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mouais, à part le rendre plus cher, je doute qu'il soit plus efficace que l'ancien modèle. Vu qu'il fera 2.5t de plus, il volera moins loin quand il se mangera un IED, ce sera plus pratique pour ramasser les bouts de bidasse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Les faiblesses du Striker doivent être comprises dans le cadre de l'analyse du Gen Shinseki.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je ne pense pas que l'on puisse gommer des défauts inhérents à sa nature. On peut en réduire certains comme avec les bas de caisse renforcés et les amortisseurs prévus pour encaisser les explosions, mais ça reste au final un taxi fait contre la mitraille et guère plus. Il doit même y avoir de bonnes idées, mais la base est assez merdique pour ce qu'on veut lui faire faire actuellement. Ce n'est pas un MRAP et tout comme le HMWWV on aura beau rajouter de la ferraille, ça n'en fera toujours pas un MRAP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le Stryker est juste un VBTT. Même s'il ne donne pas satisfaction en terme de protection, il ne s'agit pas de le transformer en MRAP. C'est, de toute façon, impossible.

Le Stryker se veut un véhicule de combat. Il lui manque aussi, pour les standards US, de la mobilité. Ils veulent aussi améliorer la situation dans ce domaine.

Shinzeky pensait que la mobilité n'avait plus lieu d'être en franchissement de même pour la protection qui devait venir de la supériorité informationnelle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

L'aménagement intérieur a base de banc et de coffre est pas terrible ... pas de liner pas d'isolation de plancher ...

Nous qui trouvions la revalorisation intérieure des VAB faiblarde. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nous qui trouvions la revalorisation intérieure des VAB faiblarde. :lol:

En fait c'est un malentendu les image NG devrait ressembler au images de Lav lorit canadien.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Voir le Stryker de base donne juste une idée des finitions initiales.

RTD devrait proposer un kit de revalorisation intérieure des VAB avec instalation à Kaboul au BCS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le STRYKER façon MRAP !

http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=4534270&c=AME&s=LAN

The U.S. Army has asked the Pentagon to approve a plan to increase Stryker vehicles' survivability by adding a double V-shaped hull, Lt. Gen. Robert Lennox, deputy chief of staff for Army programs, told members of the House Armed Services air and land forces subcommittee March 10.

After several Strykers were damaged in Afghanistan, vehicle maker General Dynamics proposed a plan in January that would allow the company to introduce the new hull design before the next Stryker brigade deployed in July 2011.

For producing a brigade combat team's worth of Stryker vehicles with the double V hull, including support vehicles, the Army estimates it will cost $800 million, according to the memo. The Army anticipates purchasing approximately 450 vehicles to support Afghanistan theater needs. This represents a change to vehicles already on order, the memo said.

The Army estimates that the design integration, prototype build and testing will cost $157.7 million. The Army is able to fund the research and development requirement because it falls closely in line with the Stryker modernization program for which funding already exists, the memo states.

The new hull design has not had full-vehicle testing yet, says the memo, but the limited testing that has been done shows "the design to be a very promising concept, potentially offering Mine Resistant Ambush Protected-like protection for the Stryker," Popps writes.

A double V hull test in October 2009 successfully tested survivability equivalent to the MRAP 2 variant, which is about twice that of the original MRAPs, said an industry source.

The double V allows improved protection without raising the height of the Stryker, while a single V configuration would raise the vehicle height significantly, said the source.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stryker, le cousin doué du F35  :happy:

Il aura couté la peau des beanbags, ce stryker! L'armée chinoise n'aurait pas fait mieux s'il fallait les saigner... :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

De tout façon, le postula de basse du concept Stryker était mauvais. Le résultat ne pouvait être que bancale.

Maintenant, le Stryker fait faire des économies en fonctionnement et l'organisation des compagnies est très intéressante.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10 ans déjà:

10 Years in Service, Strykers Continue to Improve

Published on May 10th, 2011

Written by: Tamir Eshel

Image IPB

288 Strykers from the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division arrive at Anniston Army Depot March 10.

Photo Credit: Mark Cleghorn, U.S. Army Photographer

What began as an ambitious vision in the minds of Army leaders in 1999 – to build a medium-class armored vehicle able to deploy quickly, transport troops safely, and bring agility and lethality across multiple platforms – has evolved into the battle-tested Stryker vehicle now celebrating its 10-year anniversary.

“Stryker really filled an interesting niche because the heavy forces were too difficult to deploy in certain austere environments,” Scott Davis, program executive officer, Ground Combat Systems, said. “But it wasn’t just the vehicles. The Army benefited greatly from the concept of putting multiple mission packages on a common platform.” Davis, who previously served as a deputy project manager with the Stryker program, said the Stryker’s mobility gives the warfighter an advantage. “The wheeled system is cheaper to operate and its sheer speed down the main supply routes has allowed it to perform escort roles and some patrolling roles that would have been very difficult to do with a tracked ground vehicle,” Davis said.

Image IPB

A Stryker technology demonstrator displayed at the 2010 AUSA defense expo shows possible enhancements, including improved suspensions and larger tires, a large unmanned turret mounting a 40mm canon, LEDS 150 active protection systems, double V shaped hull, blast attenuating seats and more.

Photo: Tamir Eshel, Defense Update.*

“Modularity was really the Army’s vision that Secretary Shinseki championed, ” said Maj. Gen. Robert Brown, commanding general, Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning, Ga. “The Army needed a force that was versatile, flexible, digitally capable and networked. The force needed to be packaged on a platform that increased mobility and could be rapidly deployed. The end result of this vision was the Army’s Stryker Brigade Combat Team,” Brown told an enthusiastic crowd. “This vision saved hundreds of my Soldiers’ lives in combat,” Brown added, referring to his years as a Stryker Brigade Combat Team commander. Brown said the Stryker vehicles under his command withstood a full range of enemy attacks to include rockets, small arms fire and improvised explosive devices.

The Stryker vehicle, combat proven in Iraq and Afghanistan, has now logged more than 27 million combat miles with operational readiness rates greater than 96 percent, said Col. Robert Schumitz, Stryker project manager.

Image IPB

The Stryker protection is also enhanced with a new reactive armor kit, provided by Rafael of Israel and General Dynamics Advanced Technology Products (GD ATP).

Photo: Rafael

Protection Enhancements for the Stryker

Throughout its years in service, the Stryker has undergone various survivability upgrades and received “kit” applications designed to improve the vehicle’s ability to withstand attacks. “There has been a constant evolution of survivability kits applied to the platform either in anticipation of a threat or in response to a threat,” Schumitz said. In total, 40,000 kits have been applied during the last eight years of combat operations, he added. The various survivability enhancement kits include blast-attenuated seats, additional underbelly armor, slat armor, improved suspension and electronics and extra ballistic shields for gunner protection, among other things. Another upgrade included add-on armor and beefed-up metal protecting the driver’s position, designed for the Afghan theater of operation.

One of the latest enhancements is the ‘Double-V Hull’ (DVH), modification, currently being applied to 150 Strykers prepared for shipping to Afghanistan in the upcoming weeks. DVH comprises enhanced armor and a modified V shaped belly with angles and height designed to deflect the blast generated by underbelly IED explosion, providing increased strength and protection to Soldiers in the vehicle. Soldiers inside the vehicle are also protected by blast-attenuating seats. The Stryker DVH heavy-duty suspension, wider tires compensating for the heavier weight. The Stryker DVH design went from conception to production in less than one year and the current shipments are following an extensive testing phase carried out in recent months. The double-V hull design on the new Styker uses proven technology, similar to that found on mine-resistant, ambush-protected, or MRAP, vehicles currently being used in Afghanistan. The Army plans to deploy 450 Stryker DVH vehicles, of which 140 Stryker are already in the supply chain. “The rapid turnaround of the DVH is responsiveness at its best,” Col. Schumitz said. “Soldier survivability is the Army’s number-one priority. Once we determined that the DVH effort was an achievable and acceptable risk, we swiftly engaged in executing the robust program.”

Future Stryker modernization plans include a larger engine and digitization updates that will mitigate the space, weight and power burden, and keep the Stryker formation the most digitally enhanced formation on the battlefield.

Image IPB

A Stryker fitted with Rafael's Aspro H 'hybrid armor', enhancing protection from Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPG), and replacing the statistical SLAT armor modules.

Photo: Rafael

Comment faire de la com' sur l'un des programmes les plus contesté.

Ils voulaient du léger, ils le transforment en lourd.

* Cette photo est celle à AUSA-2011 d'un Piranha-VI, non d'un Stryker modernisé.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A la base le Stryker ça devait juste être un équivalent américain au BTR russe, c'est tout. Les gens disent qu'il est fragile mais il n'a pas été prévu pour encaisser des dégâts importants. Est-ce que les engins européens équivalents pourraient encaisser des IED de plusieurs dizaines de kilos, des roquettes voire des missiles ? On critique beaucoup le Stryker mais c'est facile de critiquer un engin qui affronte des menaces pour lesquelles ils n'a pas été conçu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A la base le Stryker ça devait juste être un équivalent américain au BTR russe, c'est tout. Les gens disent qu'il est fragile mais il n'a pas été prévu pour encaisser des dégâts importants. Est-ce que les engins européens équivalents pourraient encaisser des IED de plusieurs dizaines de kilos, des roquettes voire des missiles ? On critique beaucoup le Stryker mais c'est facile de critiquer un engin qui affronte des menaces pour lesquelles ils n'a pas été conçu.

Le probleme du stryker c'est que c'est un APC déguisé en VCI ... le probleme a été le meme avec l'usage des Hummer comme véhicule de patrouille en zone dangereuse etc.

Et sur le coup plutôt que de faire une croix sur le rôle VCI du Stryker, on essaye désespérément de le modifier, comme on l'a fait pour le Hummer. Juste que ça changera pas ses tares initiales.

Les US utilisaient le Hummer la ou on utilisait le VAB, le Stryker là ou tout le monde aurait utilisé un VCI moyen/lourd etc. Ils en reviennent doucement apres etre passé par la case MRAP premiere génération, mais doucement seulement.

A leur décharge des US sont pas les seuls dans ce délire, les anglais par exemple on aussi engagé n'importe quoi en Irak et Afghnistan, et il a fallu des mort et encore des morts pour qu'il se sorte les doigts du cul et pense un peu a la protection des force avant les bricolages industriels a la mord moi le nœud.

Pour la France on a la chance d'avoir fait un choix pour, notre infanterie motorisé, qui se retrouve - par hasard? - bien pratique, le VAB 4x4, qui protège pas si mal contre les IED "moyen" et la mitraille qui coute pas trop cher, qui est pas trop lourd, assez maniable, et assez pratique pour la plupart des théâtres qu'on "subit".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pour la France on a la chance d'avoir fait un choix pour, notre infanterie motorisé, qui se retrouve - par hasard? - bien pratique, le VAB 4x4, qui protège pas si mal contre les IED "moyen" et la mitraille qui coute pas trop cher, qui est pas trop lourd, assez maniable, et assez pratique pour la plupart des théâtres qu'on "subit".

Un Stryker c'est quel niveau de protection ? sensiblement comme un VAB ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Un Stryker c'est quel niveau de protection ? sensiblement comme un VAB?

Ca dépend des addon blindage ... ca commence a la 7.62x54R pour les version basique dans les deux cas - et encore de pas trop pret, et ca peut monter a la 12.7 voire la 14.5, d'un peu loin évidement, pour les zones qui on recu les blindage rapporté.

Pour les IED par le dessous le VAB et son sous-bassement bien aéré semble s'en sortir au moins aussi bien. Par contre par l'avant ... je doute que le pilote soit plus protégé en VAB qu'en Stryker ... le pare brise étant pas super solide.

Reste que le VAB a jamais été concu pour le combat, c'était juste un camion blindé destiné a approcher l'infanterie  de la ligne de front rien de plus. Le stryker a lui été conçu dans un but plus offensif quand même.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pour les IED par le dessous les VAB on un avantage non prévu : leur légèretée. Le véhicule vole relativement facilement, ce qui est certes dangereux, mais ça évite que la caisse soit percée, ce qui serait beaucoup plus mortel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Member Statistics

    5,500
    Total Members
    1,550
    Most Online
    am60
    Newest Member
    am60
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    20,876
    Total Topics
    1,311,302
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    3
    Total Blogs
    2
    Total Entries