Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Les missiles air-air


Kiriyama
 Share

Recommended Posts

De nos jours, on fait des détecteurs portatifs et pas trop chers qui détectent une différence de quelques degrés, donc ces performances ne sont pas très étonnantes. En fait, la sensibilité des détecteurs IR est un domaine qui a énormément progressé ces dernières décennies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 8 heures, Rob1 a dit :

J'avais vu une anecdote dans le genre... mais ca date des années 1980, la sensibilité des missiles IR n'était pas la même :

Ca dépendait surtout des missiles. D'autres que l'AIM-9L avaient des performances d'un autre ordre de grandeur.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Voici une interview du responsable des programmes Missiles Air-Air de l'US Navy.

http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/america-close-maxing-out-its-deadly-aim-120-amraam-missile-16223

Rien de sensationnel, mais je suis surpris par certains commentaires:

  • l'AMRAAM s'approcherait de ses limites d'évolution
  • I'USN doit encore travailler à contrer les brouillages : ils n'ont toujours pas résolu la vulnérabilité au brouillage DRFM ?
  • Une nouvelle liaison de données qui augmenterait les performances : je ne vois pas trop à quoi ça peut correspondre :
    Je pensais que la LAM de l'AMRAAM était déjà bidirectionnelle ?
    Le guidage GPS qui améliore la portée, ça j'ai compris :biggrin:
Révélation

 

Even as the Defense Department starts fielding the new Raytheon AIM-120D version of the venerable AMRAAM, the United States doesn’t have any concrete plans for a follow-on next-generation missile. However, the U.S. Navy believes that it is possible to coax additional performance out of the AIM-120D with new software upgrades which might help the missile overcome enemy jamming and extend its range.

“Currently there is no program of record for a follow-on,” said Capt. Jim Stoneman, the Naval Air Systems Command program manager for air-to-air missiles during the Navy League Sea, Air and Space symposium in National Harbor, Maryland. But Stoneman said that there is fair bit that the Navy can do to upgrade the D-model AMRAAM with enhanced software.

The Pentagon is doing some technology development work towards a new missile, but Stoneman acknowledged the AMRAAM is nearing the end of its development cycle. The weapon still uses the same missile body and rocket motor—and relies on a mechanically-scanned active radar seeker that operates in the X-band. “They’re always doing technology development,” Stoneman told The National Interest after his briefing. “We’ve probably close to maxing it out.”

Nonetheless, the AIM-120D is currently operational and is bringing “game-changing” capability to the fleet, Stoneman said. The missile offers greatly enhanced performance compared to older versions of the AMRAAM because of a new datalink and a new GPS system, which allows the weapon to follow a more precise path. The range advantage—despite the lack of new missile body or rocket motor—is enormous.

The Navy is currently working on software upgrades to enhance the missile’s resistance to enemy jamming, Stoneman said. The service has also added a home-on-jam capability to help deal with some of the advance jamming capability that is being fielded by potential adversaries, Stoneman said.

Those potential foes include Russia and China, whose jammers pose a huge challenge for the AMRAAM. Stoneman said it would take more than one missile to counter the new Russian and Chinese jammers—instead it would take a system-of-systems approach.

Meanwhile, an industry source told me that the United States needs a new air-to-air missile to take full advantage of the range of the new Active Electronically Scanned Array radars found onboard aircraft like F-22, F-35 and F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. The radars can track targets far before they are in missile range—and moreover—American missiles are grossly outraged by new Chinese weapons like the PL-15. Even some of the newest U.S. industry developments don’t match the estimated range of the Chinese weapon. However, the source did note that American estimates of the last alleged Chinese super weapons, the PL-12, were grossly overblown.

Meanwhile, the new AIM-9X Block II—which is also is full production as of last summer—adds another capability to America’s arsenal. The new weapon is equipped with a datalink and is able to engage targets at beyond visual range—traditionally the Sidewinder is a visual range dogfighting missile. “We’ve about doubled the range that we have from the baseline missile,” Stoneman told The National Interest at the sidelines of the show. “The AMRAAM is still considerably medium range. It’s got significantly longer legs. So you’d employ them differently.

Moreover, the new Block II is able to engage target 360-degrees around an aircraft using a technique called lock-in after launch—which is a useful capability for a jet that can take advantage of the ability. The LOAL capability requires a helmet-mounted cuing system and has been integrated on some platforms, Stoneman said. Eventually, all American fighters will probably receive the new technology.

The Navy is working on a Block II+ version of the AIM-9X that is being tailored for the F-35. The new version does not add any new capabilities, Stoneman said. It’s simply designed to work with the new jet—which will carry the weapon externally. “The Block II+ is external carriage,” Stoneman said. There are no current plans for the AIM-9X to be carried internally onboard the F-35, Stoneman said. Nonetheless, work continues on improving the Block II AIM-9X incrementally.

However, work on the follow-on Block III AIM-9X has all but ceased.

 

<de retour d'exil>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Test d'un mode anti surface pour le IRIS-T

http://www.janes.com/article/66304/diehl-develops-air-to-surface-capability-for-iris-t-aam

Test fait sur un F-16 norvégien.
Les missiles versatiles ont la cote (après le SM-6 avec mode antinavire, des Mistral employés en anti surface), et ça démultiplie l'utilité des avions.

(je n'ai pas osé ressusciter le fil IRIS-T où j'ai vu des têtes familières ... déjà présentes en 2006 :biggrin:)

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 22/06/2016 à 23:51, rogue0 a dit :
  • Une nouvelle liaison de données qui augmenterait les performances : je ne vois pas trop à quoi ça peut correspondre :
    Je pensais que la LAM de l'AMRAAM était déjà bidirectionnelle ?
    Le guidage GPS qui améliore la portée, ça j'ai compris :biggrin:
  Révéler le texte masqué

 

Even as the Defense Department starts fielding the new Raytheon AIM-120D version of the venerable AMRAAM, the United States doesn’t have any concrete plans for a follow-on next-generation missile. However, the U.S. Navy believes that it is possible to coax additional performance out of the AIM-120D with new software upgrades which might help the missile overcome enemy jamming and extend its range.

“Currently there is no program of record for a follow-on,” said Capt. Jim Stoneman, the Naval Air Systems Command program manager for air-to-air missiles during the Navy League Sea, Air and Space symposium in National Harbor, Maryland. But Stoneman said that there is fair bit that the Navy can do to upgrade the D-model AMRAAM with enhanced software.

The Pentagon is doing some technology development work towards a new missile, but Stoneman acknowledged the AMRAAM is nearing the end of its development cycle. The weapon still uses the same missile body and rocket motor—and relies on a mechanically-scanned active radar seeker that operates in the X-band. “They’re always doing technology development,” Stoneman told The National Interest after his briefing. “We’ve probably close to maxing it out.”

Nonetheless, the AIM-120D is currently operational and is bringing “game-changing” capability to the fleet, Stoneman said. The missile offers greatly enhanced performance compared to older versions of the AMRAAM because of a new datalink and a new GPS system, which allows the weapon to follow a more precise path. The range advantage—despite the lack of new missile body or rocket motor—is enormous.

The Navy is currently working on software upgrades to enhance the missile’s resistance to enemy jamming, Stoneman said. The service has also added a home-on-jam capability to help deal with some of the advance jamming capability that is being fielded by potential adversaries, Stoneman said.

Those potential foes include Russia and China, whose jammers pose a huge challenge for the AMRAAM. Stoneman said it would take more than one missile to counter the new Russian and Chinese jammers—instead it would take a system-of-systems approach.

Meanwhile, an industry source told me that the United States needs a new air-to-air missile to take full advantage of the range of the new Active Electronically Scanned Array radars found onboard aircraft like F-22, F-35 and F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. The radars can track targets far before they are in missile range—and moreover—American missiles are grossly outraged by new Chinese weapons like the PL-15. Even some of the newest U.S. industry developments don’t match the estimated range of the Chinese weapon. However, the source did note that American estimates of the last alleged Chinese super weapons, the PL-12, were grossly overblown.

Meanwhile, the new AIM-9X Block II—which is also is full production as of last summer—adds another capability to America’s arsenal. The new weapon is equipped with a datalink and is able to engage targets at beyond visual range—traditionally the Sidewinder is a visual range dogfighting missile. “We’ve about doubled the range that we have from the baseline missile,” Stoneman told The National Interest at the sidelines of the show. “The AMRAAM is still considerably medium range. It’s got significantly longer legs. So you’d employ them differently.

Moreover, the new Block II is able to engage target 360-degrees around an aircraft using a technique called lock-in after launch—which is a useful capability for a jet that can take advantage of the ability. The LOAL capability requires a helmet-mounted cuing system and has been integrated on some platforms, Stoneman said. Eventually, all American fighters will probably receive the new technology.

The Navy is working on a Block II+ version of the AIM-9X that is being tailored for the F-35. The new version does not add any new capabilities, Stoneman said. It’s simply designed to work with the new jet—which will carry the weapon externally. “The Block II+ is external carriage,” Stoneman said. There are no current plans for the AIM-9X to be carried internally onboard the F-35, Stoneman said. Nonetheless, work continues on improving the Block II AIM-9X incrementally.

However, work on the follow-on Block III AIM-9X has all but ceased.

 

<de retour d'exil>

 

Une  hypothèse sur le nouveau LAM de l’AMRAAM : ils ont  amélioré la vitesse de rafraichissement  des informations.

Quand une cible fait des évasives violentes et brutales,  il faut que l’avion tireur rafraichisse  les informations de position très régulièrement et très rapidement.

Ici, ce n’est  pas la vitesse de la lumière qui est la limite mais le temps que met le LAM à transmettre les informations à l’AMRAAM plus le temps que met l’AMRAAM à  l’interpréter.

Un  LAM  plus rapide permet donc de tirer le missile AMRAAM plus loin malgré les évasives de la cible. 
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 16/12/2016 à 14:37, Marcus a dit :

 

Quand une cible fait des évasives violentes et brutales,  il faut que l’avion tireur rafraichisse  les informations de position très régulièrement et très rapidement.

 

C'est à double tranchant en fait.

Si la cible fait une unique manœuvre, une prise ne compte plus tôt augmente les performances.

Par contre, si elle enchaîne des manœuvre contradictoire (une sorte de ciseaux), le missile risque de dépenser son énergie à louvoyer en changeant en permanence de point d'impact estimé.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 11 heures, Kiriyama a dit :

Au fait, tous les missiles air-air explosent par fusée de proximité ou ils peuvent exploser à l'impact (sur une cible lente par exemple) ?

Le missile tente l'impact direct puis, si échec, utilise la fusée de proximité. 

La cible n'a pas besoin d'être vraiment lente. Si un aster peut toucher un missile qui arrive en frontale, un avion ne lui pas peur ^^

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 56 minutes, Kiriyama a dit :

Mais la capacité de manœuvre du missile est supérieure à celle de l'avion. A ce "jeu"-là c'est quand même le missile qui sort gagnant.

Le missile n'est pas propulsé sur toute sa trajectoire (sauf le METEOR) donc il s'agit d'une gestion globale de son énergie.

L'avion lui reste propulsé pendant tout ce temps.

Chaque manœuvre du missile diminue donc sa portée maximale.

Imagine que la cible est un avion qui tourne sur place sur 360° et que ton missile adapte instantanément sa trajectoire au vecteur vitesse instantanée de la cible.

Il va à un moment viser un point d'interception très à gauche puis un point d'interception très à droite, autrement dit adopté une trajectoire en zig-zag alors que sa cible sera globalement resté au même endroit et qu'en adoptant une trajectoire direct il sera aller tout droit vers la cible.

Il faut ajouter que les systèmes de brouillages, en donnant des informations un peu fausses sur les vitesse Doppler, les distances avec l'utilisation de brouillage par fenêtre glissante vont perturber le guidage d'un missile si tu mets à jour trop souvent ses informations. Idem pour les leurres le temps de les distinguer.

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 19 heures, Kiriyama a dit :

Au fait, tous les missiles air-air explosent par fusée de proximité ou ils peuvent exploser à l'impact (sur une cible lente par exemple) ?

Les deux. La fusée de proximité n'est là que pour pallier à une absence d'impact.

Il y a 7 heures, Deres a dit :

 

Imagine que la cible est un avion qui tourne sur place sur 360° et que ton missile adapte instantanément sa trajectoire au vecteur vitesse instantanée de la cible.

 

Il va à un moment viser un point d'interception très à gauche puis un point d'interception très à droite, autrement dit adopté une trajectoire en zig-zag alors que sa cible sera globalement resté au même endroit et qu'en adoptant une trajectoire direct il sera aller tout droit vers la cible.

Ce n'est pas exactement comme ça qu'un missile fonctionne. La navigation proportionnelle fait que le missile change de cap proportionnellement au défilement de sa cible. Une cible éloignée qui fait un 360 ne défile quasiment pas et n'impose donc pas une grosse correction de trajectoire. Ce défilement prend davantage d'ampleur à mesure que le missile se rapproche, mais à ce moment là l'interception est une affaire de quelques secondes pendant lesquelles aucun avion ne peut faire un 360 (à moins de voler très lentement, auquel cas son défilement apparent est forcément réduit).

  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Je repose donc ma question sur le fonctionnement de la LAM dans le fil approprié :

Citation

Je ne suis pas sur de bien me représenter comment fonctionne un tir de missile, ni des différence qu'il peut y avoir entre détecter un adversaire et avoir une solution de tir valide.

Un des avantage de l'OSF si j'ai bien compris, c'est de pouvoir détecter un adversaire en passif (il me semble que spectra doit aussi être capable de détecter de façon passive un adversaire en captant ses émissions radar).

Est ce que ça permet un solution de tir, ou est ce qu'il faudra allumer le radar ? Et si oui, qu'est qui empêche de rafraichir la piste du missile en cours de route une fois que celui ci a été tiré ? (via la LAM donc)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 13/11/2013 à 22:39, Rob1 a dit :

Donc en gros, c'est simplement que le capteur regarde à travers une face de la pyramide plutôt qu'à travers une "bulle".

 

Le 13/11/2013 à 22:47, g4lly a dit :

 

Je pense, comme les fenetre a facette des optronique du F-35 ou de certaine missile air-surface "furtif". Le capteur n'étant pas focalisé au niveau de l'IR dome mais tres loin a l'infini, les "montants" des facettes doivent passer inapercue ou presque apportant juste un léger assombrissement de l'image quand elle sont dans le champ.

 

Un IR dome conique doit soit etre trop complexe a produire, soit n'etre pas optiquement neutre. L'IR dome sphérique doit etre trop défavorable énergétiquement pour un missile sol-air léger donc quand on peut la pyramide a un avantage aérodynamique.

Petit déterrage...

Quand on regarde à travers un IRdôme pyramidal comme celui du Mistral on a un superbe kaléidoscope. Avec quelques astuces (non visibles sur les photos) on peut en limiter les effets, surtout pour un concept qui ne repose pas sur de l'imagerie. Si cela avait été la panacée, le concept aurait été réutilisé sur le Mica. On aurait gagné en portée.

Edited by Ponto Combo
orthographe
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 16/12/2016 à 14:37, Marcus a dit :

Une  hypothèse sur le nouveau LAM de l’AMRAAM : ils ont  amélioré la vitesse de rafraichissement  des informations

C'est une idée.

Je rejoins DEFA sur sa réponse :  la LAM est plutôt intéressante a moyenne /longue, là ou les manoeuvres de la cible ont un faible impact sur le missile.

Après si la MAJ de la LAM n'a pas de pénalité physique( MAJ logicielle), pourquoi pas.

J'ai d'autres hypothèses sans doute farfelue (je ne suis pas expert LAM) : 

* senseur déporté :  façon torpille ADCAP :  on tire et le missile renvoie ses données IR/ radar au tireur :  soit pour discriminer les cibles, soit pour voir au travers d'un obstacle (genre les derniers SAM japonais si l'adversaire se cache derrière la montagne)

* plus utile :  hand-off du guidage missile vers un autre senseur. La liaison LAM serait transférée a un meilleur senseur (genre Awacs, E2, navire Aegis), ce qui permet au tireur de se mettre a l'abri (plus besoin de repositionneur radar), sur le modèle du JSF guidant un tir de SM6 longue portée.

Je suppose que ca doit être très complexe (authentification, crypto, etc)...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Kineto

La détection d'une cible renseigne simplement sur sa présence dans une certaine direction et à une certaine distance. La solution de tir exige de connaître en supplément son vecteur vitesse, et éventuellement son environnement (capacité multi-cibles avec désignation d'une cible parmi plusieurs). C'est nécessaire pour d'une part savoir si la cible est dans le domaine d'interception du missile (sinon le tir est voué à l'échec), et d'autre part pour indiquer au missile un point d'interception théorique ce qui lui permet d'adopter une trajectoire optimale vers ce point, mais aussi d'engager la recherche autonome au bon moment, et éventuellement d'engager la cible désignée et non la première qui lui convient.

Compte tenu de la portée d'un missile BVR, la course vers le point d'interception prend plusieurs dizaines de secondes pendant lesquelles la situation initiale peut évoluer. La LAM sert donc à informer les missiles déjà en vol de cette nouvelle situation de sorte qu'ils puissent adapter leur comportement et maximiser les chances de réussite. C'est pourquoi le tireur doit continuer à surveiller ses cibles jusqu'à leur interception (réussie ou ratée).

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 2 heures, DEFA550 a dit :

@Kineto

La détection d'une cible renseigne simplement sur sa présence dans une certaine direction et à une certaine distance. La solution de tir exige de connaître en supplément son vecteur vitesse, et éventuellement son environnement (capacité multi-cibles avec désignation d'une cible parmi plusieurs). C'est nécessaire pour d'une part savoir si la cible est dans le domaine d'interception du missile (sinon le tir est voué à l'échec), et d'autre part pour indiquer au missile un point d'interception théorique ce qui lui permet d'adopter une trajectoire optimale vers ce point, mais aussi d'engager la recherche autonome au bon moment, et éventuellement d'engager la cible désignée et non la première qui lui convient.

Compte tenu de la portée d'un missile BVR, la course vers le point d'interception prend plusieurs dizaines de secondes pendant lesquelles la situation initiale peut évoluer. La LAM sert donc à informer les missiles déjà en vol de cette nouvelle situation de sorte qu'ils puissent adapter leur comportement et maximiser les chances de réussite. C'est pourquoi le tireur doit continuer à surveiller ses cibles jusqu'à leur interception (réussie ou ratée).

Merci beaucoup pour cette réponse très claire sur la différence entre détection et solution de tir.

Du coup, est-ce qu'il est obligatoire d'allumer son radar pour obtenir une solution de tir et rafraichir la trajectoire du missile via la LAM ?

Les méthode de détection passives (OSF, DDMNG, spectra, autre ?) ne peuvent elles pas permettre permettre d'obtenir  une solution de tir, notamment via la fusion de données entre les différentes pistes de l'avion, voir même de plusieurs avions qui travaillent en réseau ?

(Le point de départ de mon interrogation viens d'un message de pic qui disait que pour alimenter la LAM, il fallait forcément allumer son radar et qu'on ne donc pouvait pas rester en passif si on l'utilisait)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

Les méthode de détection passives (OSF, DDMNG, spectra, autre ?) ne peuvent elles pas permettre permettre d'obtenir  une solution de tir, notamment via la fusion de données entre les différentes pistes de l'avion, voir même de plusieurs avions qui travaillent en réseau ?

1- Calssifié

2- Bienvenue dans le monde prochain de Tragedac.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 29 minutes, Kineto a dit :

(Le point de départ de mon interrogation viens d'un message de pic qui disait que pour alimenter la LAM, il fallait forcément allumer son radar et qu'on ne donc pouvait pas rester en passif si on l'utilisait)

Allumer son radar, ce n'est pas pour "alimenter" la LAM, mais pour qu'elle fonctionne. C'est le radar qui sert d'émetteur à la LAM.

Après, je ne sais pas dans quelle mesure la fonction "LAM" peut fonctionner séparément de la fonction "radar" et je doute que la réponse soit à la portée de beaucoup de monde ici.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@prof.566 : y'a pas déjà l'histoire du pilote brésilien et du tir de mica dans les 6h ? c'est du "officiel" ou pas ?

@FATac : Si c'est le radar qui sert d'émetteur à la LAM, est ce que c'est via un faisceau directionnel ou omnidirectionnel (je sais pas si c'est le bon terme) ? Dans le cas ou on saurait diriger le faisceau radar sur le missile seulement, et pas sur l'avion cible, l'avion tireur pourrait rester non détecté non ? (je sais pas si je suis clair ?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,936
    Total Members
    1,749
    Most Online
    FlorianBlanchard54
    Newest Member
    FlorianBlanchard54
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.5k
    Total Topics
    1.7m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...