Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Ici on cause MBT ....


Akhilleus
 Share

Recommended Posts

Le char n'est pas à remettre en cause, il garde son utilité militaire.

Ce qui est remis en question, c'est son rôle et son utilisation.Le char perd de son intérêt si on ne contrôle pas le ciel.Il perd de son intérêt si on l'utilise seul.Le char n'est plus nécessaire pour détruire les chars adverses, la multiplication des missiles anti-chars le démontre.Le char est un maillon d'une chaîne, on ne peut pas tout miser sur lui.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Bon je ne me fie pas au titre de la vidéo, certes on entend une femme parler, mais cela ne veut pas dire que c'est elle qui tire, même si elle fort possible qu'il y ait des femmes en équipe AC . Quand le tireur envoi son missile, il reste concentré en règle général.

Bon la ça a fait mal vu l'explosion. 

Par contre j'ai du mal à voir le type de véhicule qui est frappé. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/2/2018 at 6:23 PM, Sovngard said:

Il s'agit du prototype char léger américain M8 Buford remis au goût du jour.

ULzVfAxCukyWQXKrjGo71Q

On 3/6/2018 at 3:08 PM, Xavier said:

Le char n'est pas à remettre en cause, il garde son utilité militaire.

Ce qui est remis en question, c'est son rôle et son utilisation.Le char perd de son intérêt si on ne contrôle pas le ciel.Il perd de son intérêt si on l'utilise seul.Le char n'est plus nécessaire pour détruire les chars adverses, la multiplication des missiles anti-chars le démontre.Le char est un maillon d'une chaîne, on ne peut pas tout miser sur lui.

Ça fait longtemps que le char n'est plus indispensable pour détruire les char adverse, et pourtant pendant longtemps on s'est toujours équipé de char.

Pour le contrôle du ciel c'est vrai pour tout ce qui rampe au sol pas seulement les char ... d'un autre coté si le rampant dispose de pléthore de "manpads" ca rend tout de suite plus délicate les actions d'interdiction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Citation

Ça fait longtemps que le char n'est plus indispensable pour détruire les char adverse, et pourtant pendant longtemps on s'est toujours équipé de char.

Le char est une artillerie mobile, un canon d'assaut. 

On le voit bien dans tous les conflits modernes (Irak, Syrie...). Il reste aussi le meilleur moyen de percer une position ennemie. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 10 minutes, Kiriyama a dit :

Le char est une artillerie mobile, un canon d'assaut. 

On le voit bien dans tous les conflits modernes (Irak, Syrie...). Il reste aussi le meilleur moyen de percer une position ennemie. 

 

Il y a 5 heures, g4lly a dit :

ULzVfAxCukyWQXKrjGo71Q

Ça fait longtemps que le char n'est plus indispensable pour détruire les char adverse, et pourtant pendant longtemps on s'est toujours équipé de char.

Pour le contrôle du ciel c'est vrai pour tout ce qui rampe au sol pas seulement les char ... d'un autre coté si le rampant dispose de pléthore de "manpads" ca rend tout de suite plus délicate les actions d'interdiction.

Définition du char de combat

"porter le feu chez l'ennemi sous protection"

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

15 Years Ago, I Helped Start a War That Hasn’t Ended

At War By MATT UFFORD MARCH 20, 2018

Preparing for war: Marine Corps reservists from Syracuse, N.Y., working on their Abrams M1-A1 tank as a “Jolly Roger” flies from the radio antenna of another tank on Feb. 16, 2003, at U.S.M.C. Camp Grizzly in the northern Kuwaiti desert near Iraq. Credit Paul J. Richards/Agence France-Presse

When I deployed to Iraq in 2003, there was no war. We had to start it.

As a lieutenant in charge of six tanks (four active-duty crews, two reserve), I gave a preinvasion talk to my platoon before rolling out. It was 15 years ago, and I was 24 — older than all but two of the 23 crewmen. It was a moment I had long fantasized about, inspired by the fist-pumping motivational speeches that rouse the troops in war movies like “Gladiator” and “Patton.”

[The Times is reintroducing the At War blog, a forum for the firsthand experiences of global conflict.]

Behind a line of tanks, on a stretch of Kuwaiti sand as flat and featureless as my courage, I adopted a folksy tone. “I know y’all were probably looking forward to a big ‘Braveheart’ talk, but you know me — I’m not one to speechify.” I paused, tried to stop my voice from shaking and failed. “I’m just like the rest of you: I’ve never been to combat, so I don’t know what it’s like. But I want to tell you all that it’s O.K. to be scared.” I’m not sure whom I was trying to convince more: my Marines or myself. “What’s not O.K. is to let that fear overcome you. No panicking. We’re all well trained, and as long as we go with our training and make quick decisions, we’re gonna accomplish the mission and be fine. Tank commanders, you know what I expect.” That was it. No one responded with a battle cry.

Of the 80 or so Marines in Delta Company, First Tank Battalion, only one of us had ever seen combat: a gunnery sergeant who fought in Desert Storm. His face was creased and leathery from a decade in the Mojave outpost of Twentynine Palms, and he had the unhurried gait of a man whose cartilage was shot from a career of clambering on and off no-skid steel. Soon many of us would look more like him than our selves.

A Cobra-attack helicopter circling over forward Marine positions in central Iraq in March 2003. Credit James Hill for The New York Times

We spent the weeks before the invasion in Kuwait waiting for orders, fighting off boredom. We adjusted the sights of our tanks, banged on the tracks with heavy tools, went over the assault plan, pored through satellite imagery, cleaned our weapons, practiced speed drills with gas masks and still had more empty hours than busy ones. We joked that we wanted the war to start just for a break from the monotony.

We filled the time with card games, pranks, rumors and — occasionally, quietly — our thoughts and fears about combat. My friend Travis Carlson had a specific fear of being shot through the neck. I couldn’t decide if I was more afraid of death or of the general unknown of what waited for us once we crossed the border. Nothing loomed larger, though, than the desire to live up to the storied history of the Marine Corps. I didn’t need to stand shoulder to shoulder with the legend of Chesty Puller and his five Navy Crosses or the corps’ long list of Medal of Honor recipients, but I couldn’t let them down either.

The case for the invasion was thin — or rather, it was thick, but, we now know, filled with faulty intelligence, half-truths and a fervor for war that was unsated by the conflict in Afghanistan. Back in the United States, President George W. Bush told the nation on March 19 that it was time to free the people of Iraq and “defend the world from grave danger.” Within hours, thousands of troops, including my battalion, crossed the border to look for Saddam Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction.

Our company commander stressed that we should exact only as much harm as the mission required, but a tank is not a scalpel. When we drove across a field, newly planted crops flew skyward behind our vehicles in great roostertails of earth. When we provided supporting fire to an engineer detonating mines, we felled trees with our machine guns. Inside the tank, we hardly felt a bump when we crushed cars under our treads. We brought war everywhere we went.

The pace was relentless: a race to an objective, a brief engagement — tanks have a way of ending battles quickly — and then back on the highway. We drove all day and all night, from Basra to Nasiriyah to Diwaniyah, stopping only to refuel. Over the course of a week, I slept 10 hours. No one up the chain of command seemed to care about sleep until one of Charlie Company’s tanks drove off a bridge over the Euphrates in the middle of the night. It settled in the riverbed upside-down, and the four Marines inside died.

We doglegged east to Numaniyah, then continued to push northwest on Highway 6. That’s where my friend Brian McPhillips of Second Tank Battalion was fatally shot in the head, but I wouldn’t hear the news for another two weeks. Information rarely travels laterally in war. I was a few miles from the ambush that killed him when I learned that my platoon would lead the battalion over the Diyala River and into Baghdad.

The bridge was partly destroyed. Two-thirds of the way to the far side, a chunk of the span was gone, leaving pieces of exposed rebar and a clear view to the water below. Combat engineers laid a makeshift bridge over the gap. I asked the engineer lieutenant if it would hold a tank’s weight. “I think so,” he said.

As the platoon commander, I could dictate which tank went over first, but it wasn’t really a choice. It had barely been a week since Charlie Company’s Marines drowned in the Euphrates; I left the hatch of my cupola all the way open, prepared to jump free of the vehicle if it went in the water.

As we came over the crest of the bridge, a man on the far side of the river fired an AK-47 at us. This was inconvenient. I was trying to guide our driver onto the engineer’s bridge while scanning the landscape for other threats; being shot at felt gratuitous.

“Co-ax, fire,” I said.

“On the way,” my gunner replied, and ended someone’s life with the tank’s 7.62-millimeter coaxial machine gun.

As he fired, I caught sight of a Soviet-made T-72 tank dug into a defensive position. I grabbed the override to rotate the turret while giving a hasty fire command to my gunner. The thunderous boom echoed across the battlefield, and I saw the orange spark of steel on steel. Secondary explosions followed as the T-72’s ammunition cooked off. On the radio, I reported the kills and called off the artillery mission, which was well inside the “danger close” range of 600 meters. I could feel the overpressure from the bursting shells, a concussive force that shook my cheeks.

“Hey, sir?” It was my driver. “Are those mines?”

We had driven across the bridge into a minefield. It ended up being a long day.

U.S. troops keeping watch as the Ministry of Transportation burned in Baghdad, Iraq, on April 9, 2003. Credit Tyler Hicks/The New York Times

Baghdad fell on April 9. After the resistance on the outskirts of the city, we expected a devastating battle on urban terrain. Instead, we rolled into the capital and were greeted by cheers. It felt as if my chest might burst from relief and pride: The job was done, and all my men were alive. I had been a part of the longest inland assault in Marine Corps history.

Ten days later, First Tank Battalion left the capital; our vehicles were “too aggressive” of a posture for the peacekeeping mission to come. The occupation needed military police officers and translators; we had 70-ton vehicles with high-explosive anti-tank rounds. It seemed like a rash decision — and indeed, tanks would be a mainstay of the Marine mission in Iraq for years to come — but that didn’t stop us from whooping with excitement as we left the city. The occupation was someone else’s problem now.

Fifteen years later, the invasion is a footnote to the war, and the aftermath is filled with too much death and dishonor for me to ever regret leaving the service without another deployment. But there was a moment — before Abu Ghraib, before Falluja, before the Haditha massacre, or the Surge, or the drawdown, or ISIS — that I still cherish. On the day we rolled into Baghdad as victors, First Tank Battalion encamped in the shadow of the giant turquoise dome of the Al-Shaheed Monument, enjoying the protection of the man-made lakes around it. We were abuzz with the joy of being alive and having accomplished our mission. I shared a kettle of coffee with one of my sergeants, and I told him I wanted to come back to Baghdad one day to see what it might look like in peace and prosperity. As the sun set on a liberated city, golden light turned the dusty sidewalks to warm coral, and for a moment it felt as if the war were over.

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 06/03/2018 à 15:08, Xavier a dit :

Le char n'est pas à remettre en cause, il garde son utilité militaire.

Ce qui est remis en question, c'est son rôle et son utilisation.Le char perd de son intérêt si on ne contrôle pas le ciel.Il perd de son intérêt si on l'utilise seul.Le char n'est plus nécessaire pour détruire les chars adverses, la multiplication des missiles anti-chars le démontre.Le char est un maillon d'une chaîne, on ne peut pas tout miser sur lui.

 

Pour appuyer cela une interview de Marc Chassillian sur l'usage ubiquitaire du char dans les conflits récents et, surtout, même par des acteurs non étatiques :

https://www.lopinion.fr/blog/secret-defense/marc-chassillan-dans-guerres-actuelles-il-y-a-chars-partout-145371

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ce qui ressort et est vraiment intéressant, c'est la notion de rusticité des matériels. 

Avec notamment l'exemple du T-55, infiniment moins performant que le M1 Abrams, mais bien plus résistant dans la durée finalement. 

Est-ce que l'avenir n'est pas à la combinaison de quelques matériels high-tech en cas de conflits de grande intensité, et la masse de matériel "anciens" mais modernisés ? 

Edited by Kiriyama
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Là, maintenant et présentement . Quelles sont les nations possédant un parc roulant suffisamment dimensionné pour autoriser du rétrofit sur du vintage ? Ou plutôt quelles nations ont la capacité de se payer ce genre de luxe, et dont l'essentiel de la trésorerie budgétaire (crédit de titre III et V confondus) n'est pas TOTALEMENT dédiée à tenter d’assurer une simple cohérence de parc au quotidien ?

Je n'ose essayer, sur ce registre, d'échanger sur le notre, de parc. Et encore moins d'en dégager des contractions (pour le coup ) mécaniques, histoire de trouver des queues de crédits.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 4 heures, Kiriyama a dit :

Ce qui ressort et est vraiment intéressant, c'est la notion de rusticité des matériels. 

Avec notamment l'exemple du T-55, infiniment moins performant que le M1 Abrams, mais bien plus résistant dans la durée finalement. 

Est-ce que l'avenir n'est pas à la combinaison de quelques matériels high-tech en cas de conflits de grande intensité, et la masse de matériel "anciens" mais modernisés ? 

Soyons observateur sur quelques point de détails :

Qui emploi ces matos ? 

Comment il est employé ? 

Comment il a à été capturé ou comment Il a était détruit ? 

Quels sont les contextes qui voient l'emploi de ce matos ? 

Quelques réponses en vrac :

Pour les M1, ceux-ci ont été rapidement abandonné par une armée irakienne en déroute, que daesh les a récupéré et c'est aperçu qu'ils étaient trop compliqué à utilisé, que les pièces pour la maintenance seraient difficile à utiliser. 

En détruisant ces chars M1 ont surtout servi leur propagande, alors que ces M1 auraient été plus utile pour eux en les employant au moins un certains temps... 

Donc au final, le M1 n'a pas été employé contre son ancien propriétaire. Chose appréciable sur le fond tout en ayant la perspective des limites d'adaptation de l'adversaire, qui en voyant un matos moderne n'a pas été capable de l'employer même sur un temps court. Au final, même si les barbus les ont détruit pour leur propagande, il est rassurant de voir qu'ils ont des compétences limité pour la réutilisation du matos de ce type. 

En ce qui concerne les T55 and Co, dans le contexte irakien ou syrien ceux qui ont été capturé par les islamistes et certains rebelles ont été vite limité dans leur emploi offensif, condamné à faire du défensif voir à être planqué des que l'aviation, l'artillerie, les missiles ont été employé par le régime ou les occidentaux. 

Le coût est à prendre en compte aussi, et je pense que le régime syrien par exemple cela va lui coûter un bras pour garder son parc déjà ancien et bien user, et que si l'aide russe ne serait pas arrivé via des chars plus récent, ben je pense qu'il n'aurait pas put s'offrir nombre d'opération offensive. 

Donc il faut aussi prendre du recul sur tout cela. 

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 16 heures, Gibbs le Cajun a dit :

Soyons observateur sur quelques point de détails :

Qui emploi ces matos ? 

Comment il est employé ? 

Comment il a à été capturé ou comment Il a était détruit ? 

Quels sont les contextes qui voient l'emploi de ce matos ? 

Quelques réponses en vrac :

Pour les M1, ceux-ci ont été rapidement abandonné par une armée irakienne en déroute, que daesh les a récupéré et c'est aperçu qu'ils étaient trop compliqué à utilisé, que les pièces pour la maintenance seraient difficile à utiliser. 

En détruisant ces chars M1 ont surtout servi leur propagande, alors que ces M1 auraient été plus utile pour eux en les employant au moins un certains temps... 

Donc au final, le M1 n'a pas été employé contre son ancien propriétaire. Chose appréciable sur le fond tout en ayant la perspective des limites d'adaptation de l'adversaire, qui en voyant un matos moderne n'a pas été capable de l'employer même sur un temps court. Au final, même si les barbus les ont détruit pour leur propagande, il est rassurant de voir qu'ils ont des compétences limité pour la réutilisation du matos de ce type. 

En ce qui concerne les T55 and Co, dans le contexte irakien ou syrien ceux qui ont été capturé par les islamistes et certains rebelles ont été vite limité dans leur emploi offensif, condamné à faire du défensif voir à être planqué des que l'aviation, l'artillerie, les missiles ont été employé par le régime ou les occidentaux. 

Le coût est à prendre en compte aussi, et je pense que le régime syrien par exemple cela va lui coûter un bras pour garder son parc déjà ancien et bien user, et que si l'aide russe ne serait pas arrivé via des chars plus récent, ben je pense qu'il n'aurait pas put s'offrir nombre d'opération offensive. 

Donc il faut aussi prendre du recul sur tout cela. 

https://www.lopinion.fr/blog/secret-defense/marc-chassillan-dans-guerres-actuelles-il-y-a-chars-partout-145371

Citation

Qu’en est-il de la technologie des armes réellement employées ?

Ces conflits sont longs, ce sont des guerres d’usure. La première qualité du matériel est l’endurance, la robustesse et la rusticité. Et le besoin d’un faible soutien logistique. Le char américain M1 Abrams est le contre-exemple : il consomme 2 000 litres de gasoil pour 300 km. Et les composants de sa mobilité (train de roulement, moteur) sont réputés fragiles. Personne n’est donc capable d’en assurer le MCO et les M1 irakiens capturés par Daech ont été détruits comme trophées. Alors qu’avec un vieux T55, en deux heures, quatre paysans sont capables de l’utiliser ! On devrait donc sérieusement réfléchir à l’emploi de vieux matériels, comme celui des Russes. Ils sont très efficaces quand on les emploie bien. Ainsi les T55 de Daesh ont été utilisés plus efficacement que les M1 Abrams saoudiens au Yémen. Avec une petite couche de modernisme (des bons postes radios et des systèmes de vision nocturne), les engins rustiques pourraient souvent suffire pour ce qu’il y à faire. Un autre trait saillant est l’usage immodéré des missiles antichars et pas seulement contre les blindés. Grâce à la protection que la distance garantit, on tire sur tout, des murs, des snipers, etc.

exemple

https://fr.sputniknews.com/defense/201803211035600571-syrie-chars-modernisation/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a une heure, LBP a dit :

J'ai déjà lu l'article, et il ne m'a pas convaincu du tout, justement mon message était une réponse indirecte à cet article. 

De plus je l'ai partagé sur le file programme Scorpion, en ayant déjà disons apporté des critiques. 

Le seul point que j'ai trouvé intéressant mais qui m'a paru évident est le fait de rappeler qu'il ne faut pas oublier que l'on n'a pas eu affaire à un état qui aurait des moyens... 

Pour spoutnik... La j'ai du mal vu le niveau de ce média... 

Edit : on oubli que les M1 ont étaient employé en 1991avec des M60A1, et qu'il n'y a pas eu de déconvenue face à des chars type T55 et T72, idem en 2003, et dans les batailles américaine  comme Fallujah. 

Certes en face il n'y a pas de missiles AC comme en Syrie, mais cela ne veut pas dire qu'il n'y aura pas une capacité d'adaptation. Moi la seule chose qui me chagrine c'est que les russes, les occidentaux ont filé des lance missile AC au régime ou au groupes rebelles... Le pb c'est qu'entre ceux qui se sont barré chez les islamistes de tout poil, les soldats du régime qui ne sont pas tout clair... Cet armement risque de finir tôt ou tard sur le marché noir... 

Et la je pense qu'il va falloir prendre en compte ce risque... 

Comme quoi je ne disais pas que des conneries à une époque ou je mettais en avant se risque.  

De plus comparer la logistique US à la logistique syrienne via les russes, et pas vraiment logique. 

De plus il ne faut pas oublier le niveau de formation des équipages occidentaux, on est largement au dessus de pas mal de pays, sans avoir les chevilles qui gonflent bien évidemment. 

 

 

Edited by Gibbs le Cajun
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 1 heure, Gibbs le Cajun a dit :

J'ai déjà lu l'article, et il ne m'a pas convaincu du tout, justement mon message était une réponse indirecte à cet article. 

De plus je l'ai partagé sur le file programme Scorpion, en ayant déjà disons apporté des critiques. 

Le seul point que j'ai trouvé intéressant mais qui m'a paru évident est le fait de rappeler qu'il ne faut pas oublier que l'on n'a pas eu affaire à un état qui aurait des moyens... 

Pour spoutnik... La j'ai du mal vu le niveau de ce média... oui

Edit : on oubli que les M1 ont étaient employé en 1991avec des M60A1, et qu'il n'y a pas eu de déconvenue face à des chars type T55 et T72, idem en 2003, et dans les batailles américaine  comme Fallujah. 

Certes en face il n'y a pas de missiles AC comme en Syrie, mais cela ne veut pas dire qu'il n'y aura pas une capacité d'adaptation. Moi la seule chose qui me chagrine c'est que les russes, les occidentaux ont filé des lance missile AC au régime ou au groupes rebelles... Le pb c'est qu'entre ceux qui se sont barré chez les islamistes de tout poil, les soldats du régime qui ne sont pas tout clair... Cet armement risque de finir tôt ou tard sur le marché noir... s'ils ne finissent pas en europe ?

Et la je pense qu'il va falloir prendre en compte ce risque... 

Comme quoi je ne disais pas que des conneries à une époque ou je mettais en avant se risque.  

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@LBP

Je pense surtout qu'on risque peut-être de les voir plutôt utiliser au Moyen-Orient, dans la zone sahélienne. 

Edit :

On a perdu un FS du 13ème RDP dans la zone du Levant, et il y a une vidéo et des photos montrant l'Aravis qui a été frappé. Si ma mémoire est bonne on voit un missile AC toucher l'Aravis. Je ne pense pas que c'était un RPG 7. 

Donc on a déjà un risque via la menace missile AC qui ce retrouve dans de mauvaises mains. 

Edited by Gibbs le Cajun
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 27/03/2018 à 19:24, Gibbs le Cajun a dit :

@LBP

Je pense surtout qu'on risque peut-être de les voir plutôt utiliser au Moyen-Orient, dans la zone sahélienne. 

Edit :

On a perdu un FS du 13ème RDP dans la zone du Levant, et il y a une vidéo et des photos montrant l'Aravis qui a été frappé. Si ma mémoire est bonne on voit un missile AC toucher l'Aravis. Je ne pense pas que c'était un RPG 7. 

Donc on a déjà un risque via la menace missile AC qui ce retrouve dans de mauvaises mains. 

c'était du kornet selon de (très) bonnes sources

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 9 minutes, floflo7886 a dit :

c'était du kornet selon de (très) bonnes sources

Effectivement, merci pour la précision. 

Je pense qu'on va aussi avoir des surprises via du Tow un de ces 4 matins. 

Le marché noir n'est pas près de s'arrêter dans cette région. 

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a une heure, winloose a dit :

Je ne suis pas un expert en tank et  en tombant sur ce document suédois https://cloud.mail.ru/public/FVLe/iUZw87trH je me demandais à quoi correspondait les parties vertes et rouges sur les tourelles de la page 65 du dit document.

Sans doute une densité de blindage mais ça reste assez obscur pour moi.

Merci pour le document.

Par analogie avec les autres diagrammes (comme en page 40), j'ai interprété de la façon suivante:

  • rouge = blindage percé par la munition (flèche à 700mm de pénétration RHA à gauche 20° d'incidence, charge creuse à 1200mm de pénétration HEAT 20° d'incidence)
  • vert = le blindage a résisté

Et les petits graphes à droite montre effectivement la surface du char résistant à telle pénétration (genre flèche à 400mm RHA : 80% de la surface protégée).

Par contre, quelle est la fiabilité de ces données très détaillées ?
(notamment en page 54, comparatif du surblindage suédois et allemand pour le Strv122)
Et ça ne devrait pas être classifié ?
(même si ce sont des données portant sur des évaluation d'il y a 25 ans ... où le Leclerc est jugé pas assez mûr)

Edited by rogue0
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Member Statistics

    5,962
    Total Members
    1,749
    Most Online
    Mathieu
    Newest Member
    Mathieu
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    21.5k
    Total Topics
    1.7m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...