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Ok, abus de langage lié à la recherche au groenland: SETHI = radar + optique multispectre en synergie.

Allez, je poste une troisième fois :

https://www.onera.fr/sites/default/files/actualites/breves/Fiche_Sethi-Ramses_NG_VF.pdf

Mais @prof.566 tu réagis chaque fois qu’on évoque le bidule que tu sembles bien connaître, mais de façon allusive : tu ne veux pas faire un peu de vulgarisation pour les nuls (moi :smile:), et par exemple expliquer ce que ce proto a de novateur ou d’ambitieux ?

 

Edited by Hirondelle

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Airbus Widebodies Break Boeing’s Japan Dominance

https://aviationweek.com/commercial-aviation/airbus-widebodies-break-boeing-s-japan-dominance?NL=AW-05&Issue=AW-05_20190705_AW-05_944&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_2&utm_rid=CPEN1000001204990&utm_campaign=20237&utm_medium=email&elq2=2ff045c3165a4e0c831a74eb48d63afc

While the arrival of Japan Airlines’ (JAL) first Airbus A350 marks the start of a major transition in the carrier’s widebody fleet, it also represents a notable change for the country’s airline industry.

In recent years, Japan’s two main airlines—JAL and All Nippon Airways (ANA)–have relied exclusively on Boeing products for their widebody fleets. Boeing will still be dominant in this market for the foreseeable future, but Airbus twin-aisles will also be appearing in increasing numbers from this year.

The first of 18 A350-900s was delivered to JAL on June 13, and it also has 13 of the -1000 variant due to arrive in the longer term. The airline will use these aircraft to begin replacing the Boeing 777s that are currently the backbone of its domestic and international widebody operations.

JAL begins 777 replacement with A350 deliveries

More fleet refresh decisions are also approaching

JAL is not the first Japanese carrier to debut an Airbus widebody this year, however. ANA received its initial Airbus A380 in March, with another delivered since then and a third on order. Airbus has also already made significant inroads in Japanese narrowbody fleets, with A320-family aircraft operated by major airlines and low-cost carriers (LCC).

For JAL, the A350-900s will mainly be used to replace the 777s on domestic routes. The A350-1000s will primarily be deployed on international routes. There is no date set for the -1000s to begin arriving, but they are likely to be 3-4 years away, according to JAL President Yuji Akasaka. He made these comments on the sidelines of the International Air Transport Association’s annual meeting in Seoul on June 2.

Like ANA, JAL has also been building a sizable Boeing 787 fleet. However, JAL views the A350s as the primary replacement for the 777s, the airline says.

JAL’s A350s are set to debut in scheduled service on Sept. 1, on flights between Tokyo Haneda Airport and Fukuoka. These aircraft will have new cabin products and will introduce seat-back inflight entertainment screens in all classes for the first time in JAL’s domestic operation. They will be configured with 369 seats in three classes.

Japan Airlines received its first Airbus A350 in June, with another 30 to be delivered. Credit: A. Doumenjou/Airbus

The carrier currently operates 40 777s, including -200s, -200ERs, -300s and -300ERs. This means the A350 orders placed so far will not be enough to completely replace the 777s. JAL does hold options for 25 additional A350s, and will think about exercising them at some point, Akasaka says. However, serious consideration of these options will wait until the A350s have proven themselves in service.

In addition to the A350s, JAL also has three 787-9s and four 787-8s remaining on order. The first of the -8s is due in the autumn, with all four to be used on domestic routes. This will be the first time 787s have been used regularly in JAL’s domestic operation. The carrier currently has 25 787-8s and 17 787-9s that are all used internationally. The airline also has about 20 options remaining for 787s.

After a few years of conservative growth, JAL intends to ramp up its capacity in its next fiscal year beginning April 1, 2020. This will be a big year for Japanese airlines as the Tokyo Olympics boost visitor numbers, and new slots will allow additional flights from crowded Haneda Airport.

The additional Haneda slots will be divided between overseas airlines and Japanese carriers. JAL does not yet know how many it will receive, although the government is expected to reveal the allocation for Japanese carriers in late summer or early autumn of this year.

Depending on the slot allocation, JAL could increase its international capacity by about 10% in fiscal 2020, Akasaka says. That would represent a significant acceleration from the 2.5% international growth planned for the current fiscal year.

However, the capacity increase will not be achieved by dramatic fleet growth, as most of the new deliveries will be matched by retirements. JAL expects the group fleet to grow to 236 by the end of fiscal 2020, up from the 230 it operates now.

Despite the relatively low fleet expansion, JAL is “very well positioned” to prepare for the demand increase next year, says Akasaka. He notes the airline has plenty of scope to raise its utilization on its existing fleet. Changing to a higher-density configuration on certain aircraft will also boost capacity.

More seats will be added to some 787-8s by removing premium economy, shrinking business class slightly and significantly increasing economy class. JAL’s planned LCC subsidiary, Zipair Tokyo, will provide another avenue for growth. The LCC is due to launch next year with two Boeing 787-8s, with steady expansion in subsequent years. Zipair is wholly owned, although Akasaka says JAL may look at adding other investors, including companies outside the airline industry. “We believe there is a strong market, both inbound and outbound, for the [Zipair] product,” he says.

Other fleet decisions are on the horizon for the JAL group. The next widebody replacement need will likely be its Boeing 767s, and the carrier has previously indicated it may start discussing its alternatives sometime after 2020. JAL operates 35 767s, including the -300 and -300ER variants.

JAL will also eventually have to decide on replacements for its fleet of 50 Boeing 737-800s operated by the parent carrier. The average age of this fleet is just under 10 years. Akasaka stresses this is still relatively young, so the airline has time to consider its options. He says the Boeing MAX and Airbus A320neo families would both be viable candidates.

There has also been activity at the smaller end of the scale, as regional carriers in the JAL Group companies are upgrading their fleets with ATR turboprops. Japan Air Commuter is progressively introducing the ATR 42-600 and 72-600, while Hokkaido Air System has ordered ATR 42-600s and plans to debut the type in 2020.

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Il y a 2 heures, zx a dit :

Airbus dévoile son nouvel avion hybride et à turbopropulseur en forme d'oiseau

Encore + évocateur avec  ... "nouveau concept d’avion hybride-électrique, inspiré des rapaces. Avec pour objectif de motiver les futurs ingénieurs de son secteur d’activité" 

Remarquerez vous la queue du rapace ?  

airbus10.jpg

  • Haha 1

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Il y a 2 heures, Bechar06 a dit :

Remarquerez vous la queue du rapace ?  

Un concept design fais rêver et ouvre la voie. A ton avis, qu'est e qui fera le plus rêver entre :

  • "en 2030 on aura un avion avec des plumes en métal dont la forme est inspiré d'un rapace",
  • ou " en 2030 ce drapeau existera encore" ?
  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

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AIR FRANCE achète  des A220-300   pour remplacer progressivement ses A318 ( 18 en ligne ) et A319 ( 33 en ligne ) 

https://www.air-cosmos.com/article/air-france-devrait-recevoir-ses-premiers-airbus-a220-300-en-2021-21533

La fin des petits Airbus issus de l'A320 ?   Et AF va aussi se séparer des A380 (  10 ) 

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11 hours ago, Bechar06 said:

La fin des petits Airbus issus de l'A320 ?   Et AF va aussi se séparer des A380 (  10 ) 

Les petits "A320" (A318 et A319) n'ont pas été de très grands succès (surtout l'A318), et c'est encore plus le cas sur la famille Neo (35 A319 Neo commandés sur plus de 6700 commandes en tout) ou l'A320 et surtout l'A321 (ce dernier représentait 20 % de la flotte ceo et représentera plus de 40 % de la flotte neo) cassent la baraque.

Il y a donc une "montée" en gamme de l'A320 qui devient plus un moyen-long courrier (6400-8700 km), donc il faut bien "boucher" la gamme en bas, ce à quoi sert l'A220 en se concentrant sur le créneau 110-150 passagers (les A320/21 Neo étant plus sur le 160-230) avec un rayon de max 6200 km.

Clairon

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Il y a 11 heures, Bechar06 a dit :

AIR FRANCE achète  des A220-300   pour remplacer progressivement ses A318 ( 18 en ligne ) et A319 ( 33 en ligne ) 

https://www.air-cosmos.com/article/air-france-devrait-recevoir-ses-premiers-airbus-a220-300-en-2021-21533

La fin des petits Airbus issus de l'A320 ?   Et AF va aussi se séparer des A380 (  10 ) 

La fin de l'A318 a été actée avec le lancement du NEO. l'A319 a reçu un bon accueil a ses débuts, mais avec la version NEO il devient trop lourd pour être vraiment compétitif.

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Quote

Au quotidien, le principal challenge reste la montée en cadence de la production de monocouloirs de la famille A320, rendue encore plus nécessaire par le succès commercial de la version A321. Si l'objectif reste de passer de 57 à 60 appareils par mois cette année et 63 en 2021, les difficultés rencontrées sur la production des nouvelles versions de l'A321 à Hambourg risquent de retarder la montée en cadence, a reconnu Guillaume Faury. Pour tenter d'y remédier, Airbus envisage même de reconvertir une partie de la chaîne d'assemblage des A380 à Toulouse, en chaîne d'assemblage d'A321.

https://www.lesechos.fr/industrie-services/air-defense/airbus-devoile-des-resultats-en-forte-hausse-1069733

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Un p'tit problème avec Newton ! :rolleyes:

Citation

Problème de centre de gravité: Lufthansa ne vend plus les sièges de la dernière rangée de l'A320neo

https://www.bfmtv.com/economie/probleme-de-stabilite-lufthansa-ne-vend-plus-les-sieges-de-la-derniere-rangee-de-l-airbus-a320neo-1766374.html

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Airbus laisse le champ libre à Boeing, on a aucun gros porteur équivalent au B747 ou B777

Airbus Faces Dominant Boeing In Freighter Market

https://aviationweek.com/commercial-aviation/airbus-faces-dominant-boeing-freighter-market?utm_rid=CPEN1000001204990&utm_campaign=21566&utm_medium=email&elq2=b90e4a87da57436ba4f0ffe95ca309b3

 

It is not entirely true that Airbus is not investing in freighters. After all, the European aircraft manufacturer has decided to add the A330-based Beluga XL to its in-house fleet of cargo aircraft to cope with the logistics challenges of ramping up production and having to carry larger components across Europe at the same time.

However, though it offers its customers a broad range of passenger aircraft, it currently builds only one freighter model, the A330-200F, while also offering conversions of the A330, A320 and A321. The A330-200F has been selling poorly for years, with orders totaling 42 aircraft, 38 of which have been delivered. Boeing, by contrast, continues to build freighter variants of the 767, 777 and 747-8 in what effectively is a highly comfortable monopoly. More than a few customers complain about the high prices Boeing demands in its position of strength, but they do not have a choice.

Airbus does not really have a freighter strategy—unless it is not to build any. The big questions are: Will that change? And if so, how?

Airbus builds only one poorly selling freighter

Lack of portfolio offering leaves Boeing with monopoly for large freighters

Conversion business grows with A320s and A321s

Sash Tusa, aerospace analyst at Agency Partners, believes it should change—and quickly. “It is incredibly unusual in civil aerospace for one manufacturer to be given a free run,” he says. “Airbus is effectively allowing Boeing to underpin its otherwise older widebody line—it is a very odd strategy.

“The 767 has not been competitive as a passenger aircraft for probably 10 years,” he notes as just one example. “But freighters and tankers sustain production and help with overhead recovery.” The benefits flow into the 777 and 787 programs. The 777F, he says, “[has been] a really important part of the bridge from the first generation of 777s to the 777X.” With reference to Boeing’s 777 output, Tusa says, “It is a free gift if you don’t have to compete on 15-20% of your production.” 

The 747 line would have been shut down long ago had it not been for the cargo version, whose requirements were taken into account by Joe Sutter and his team when they conceived the aircraft in the 1960s.

Airbus declined to be interviewed on its freighter strategy for this article.

At the end of August, 11,616 Airbus aircraft were in the active fleet; fewer than 300 were cargo aircraft. The A300 and A310 still make up the largest portion—airlines continue to operate 195 of them, according to the Aviation Week Intelligence Network Fleet Discovery database. Federal Express is the largest operator, with 68 A300s and three A310s; UPS has 51 A300s. European Air Transport (EAT) is another significant A300 cargo operator, with a fleet of 21 aircraft. EAT flies on behalf of DHL. Thirty-eight A330-200Fs have been delivered, and Elbe Flugzeugwerke (EFW), a joint venture between Airbus and ST Aerospace, is gearing up a passenger-to-freighter (P2F) conversion program for used A320s, A321s and A330-200/300s.

Airbus has begun delivering A330-300P2Fs to complement its A330-200F offering. Credit: Airbus

By all measures, the portfolio is modest, and there are reasons why it has come to this. Historically, the Airbus mindset has focused on building comfortable passenger aircraft. The launch of the A300 was all about unifying the European industry behind an aircraft that would meet passenger airline demands. Ironically, it is also Airbus’ most successful freighter to date, but that came only later, more of a positive side effect than a core strategy. The case was similar for the A310 and A320: Very early on Airbus’ founding fathers knew the company would never be successful unless they were able to develop a family of aircraft. The A310 was the first step, as a shrunken version of the A300; the A320 was the second and arguably far more important one, as it marked entry into the big narrowbody market.

Culturally, Airbus was not about freighters until the A380, the first Airbus aircraft conceived from the start with a freighter version in mind, which was initially launched with a FedEx order for the A380F. Of course, the version was later dropped as Airbus focused on sorting out the production mess of the passenger variant and digesting the billions in extra costs involved. It never revisited the idea of offering the freighter version, which would have offered payload capabilities of up to 150 tons. The 747-8F can transport as much as 137 tons.

In addition to the culture, there is a second element that has influenced Airbus’ thinking: caution. The A380 production chaos was a traumatic experience that transformed the company in many ways. The most important lesson learned was to do everything possible to play it safe. The launch of the A350 was a great business risk that was seen as unavoidable because Boeing had launched the 787 and customers such as the International Lease Finance Corp. made it very clear to Airbus that its initial idea of upgrading the A330 was not nearly good enough.

One way of simplifying and derisking the program was to drop the freighter version: Airbus had plans for an A350-900F early on. The aircraft was going to offer a maximum payload of 90 tons on ranges up to 5,000 nm. That is less than the 102 tons the 777F can fly over similar distances but significantly more than the 67 tons Airbus advertises for the (shorter-range) A330-200F and the 60 tons offered on the A330-200P2F.

Over the years, airlines have continued to express interest in a freighter version of the A350. Cargolux, an all-cargo airline, has said it would seriously consider complementing its Boeing 747 fleet with the aircraft. Qatar Airways has encouraged Airbus to launch it, and Lufthansa Cargo also said it would take a look at it as early 2017. Lufthansa Cargo has meanwhile grown its 777F fleet to an extent that makes a parallel A350-900F fleet unlikely. Airbus executives have said they will look at all options.

From a strategic viewpoint, “they need to think about a freighter variant rather than a further stretch,” Tusa says. There are several reasons: Offering a large freighter would break into Boeing’s current monopoly in the market segment with the consequential impact on its competitor’s margins. And the A350 is being built at a rate of 10 aircraft per month, a high level of production for a long-haul aircraft. 

Only the 787 has more output, 14 per month. But both manufacturers face an extended drought for widebody orders. Airbus was more than happy for Emirates preliminarily agreeing to buy 40 A330neos and 30 A350s as part of the termination of the A380 program, but the order has not yet been confirmed and is now shelved pending agreements with engine manufacturer Rolls-Royce. It therefore will not help fill any potential nearer-term production gaps.

While a freighter version of the A350 would not solve any issues in the short term, given the development and testing lead time of several years, it could still help avoid future gaps. “They need to think about a freighter variant rather than a -2000,” Tusa says, referring to preliminary studies of a further stretch for the passenger version.

Also, the risk-avoidance argument continues to lose significance. While the ramp-up to 10 aircraft a month has been a laborious exercise that took many years, it was ultimately successful. Airbus is unable to meet its delivery commitments for the A320neo family, but it by and large hits its A350 targets.

In addition, Airbus could well use work for its development engineers. The A321XLR is the only new aircraft variant in the planning stages. A big project such as Boeing’s new midmarket airplane (NMA) is not on the horizon, and Airbus CEO Guillaume Faury says an A320neo successor will likely not be ready until 2035.

The A330-200F is Airbus’ only new-build freighter. Four more aircraft are in the firm order backlog. Credit: Airbus

But Airbus’ view of the freighter market is such that it downplays the size of the large-aircraft segment, in which it has no presence. In its most recent global market forecast (GMF) the company predicts airlines will need around 2,500 additional cargo aircraft in the next 20 years. Of these, about 860 will be newly built, but the vast majority (1,700) will be converted ex-passenger aircraft. In total, Airbus believes airlines will order close to 40,000 new aircraft, with cargo representing only about 2% of the market.

Also, the forecast assumes 500 of the aircraft will be in the 40-80-ton payload category in which it offers the A330-200F and P2F, below the A350. Accordingly, it notes that airlines will buy only 360 aircraft offering capacity in excess of 80 tons-—an average of 18 per year. Assuming a 50% market share, it is tough to make the business case work.

Of the additional aircraft, 60% are to be used for replacement and 40% for growth, according to the forecast. In total, the fleet will increase by around 55%, far slower than what Airbus predicts for passenger jets.

The rapid growth of the passenger aircraft fleet has a dampening effect on demand for dedicated cargo aircraft, Airbus believes. Belly cargo is going to grow by 4.3% annually, it projects, while main-deck freight is limited to 2.8%. Of all cargo, 60% is forecast to be carried in the holds of passenger aircraft.

Yet Airbus offers a range of conversions, a segment it hopes will grow as cheaper secondhand former passenger aircraft become available. The A330-200P2F has a maximum payload of 59 tons and a range of 4,200 nm. The larger A330-400P2F can carry two tons more but only for 3,700 nm. By comparison, the A330-200F has a maximum payload of 70 tons and maximum range of 4,100 nm.

To date, three A330-300P2Fs have been delivered to DHL Express, and EgyptAir flies two A330-200P2Fs. DHL has firm orders for five and Egypt Air for one additional aircraft.

EFW, ST Aerospace and Airbus launched an A320/321 conversion program in 2015. Vallair is the launch customer for the A321P2F and will take delivery of its first aircraft in 2020. It will fly on behalf of Australia’s Post.

Edited by zx

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...et une plainte identique est en cours à l'OMC contre Boeing, verdict dans quelques mois avec sûrement des taxes dans l'autre sens

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Il y a 2 heures, prof.566 a dit :

il n'y a qu'à taxer de 100% le F-35 dans l'UE et hop, on a notre mesure de rétorsion.

Les néerlandais, belges, italiens, danois, polonais demain (les norvégiens et les anglais ne sont évidemment pas concernés), vont donc se taxer eux-mêmes? :tongue:

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35 minutes ago, Patrick said:

Les néerlandais, belges, italiens, danois, polonais demain (les norvégiens et les anglais ne sont évidemment pas concernés), vont donc se taxer eux-mêmes? :tongue:

Non, leurs F-35 seront made in italy non? Par contre, les éléments de provenance US...

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le problème est que  contrat bidonné ou subvention, ce sont des groupes dont les investissements son tels qu'il est impossible pour elles de se financer autrement, ou alors il faut se passer d'avions et de fusées.

 

Edited by zx

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Concernant Airbus, j'avais lu quelques articles édifiant concernant sont ancien PDG, Thomas Enders.
 

https://www.agoravox.fr/tribune-libre/article/comment-le-germano-yankee-tom-214135

https://www.marianne.net/debattons/tribunes/emmanuel-macron-doit-renvoyer-tom-enders-pour-sauver-airbus

Notamment concernant les data center qui serai confié a des boites américaines avec tous les documents sensibles à la merci de la concurrence. 
 

Est ce que quelqu'un serai plus au courant de cette affaire ? Si les faits reproché était vrai, comment un individu comme lui a pu être nommé à ce poste pendant toute ces années sans que personne ne bouge le petit doigt ? 

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c'est pareil pour l'UE, ils ont confiés leur data a des sociétés américaines, autant dire, que oncle sam serait idiot de ne pas en profiter surtout en pleine guerre économique. c'est un ami qui nous ne veut pas du bien. c'est plus ce que c'était, poser un micro, monter une équipe d'espion, là il suffit  d'appuyer sur un bouton sans bouger du bureau. c'est cool.

Edited by zx

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