Jump to content
AIR-DEFENSE.NET

Guerre Russie-Ukraine 2022+ : considérations géopolitiques et économiques


Recommended Posts

Voilà longtemps qu'on n'avait pas entendu parler de Dimitri Anatolievitch. Il était même permis de se demander s'il pourrait être un peu souffrant :huh: ?

Non, il est en très grande forme au contraire.

Il publie une photo de la place de l'Indépendance à Kiev Майдан незалежності Maïdan nezalejnosti

Avec ce commentaire " Bientôt, la place de la Russie"

 

Le pire c'est que ce n'est pas un clown qui parle. C'est le vice-président du Conseil de sécurité russe. Et ce n'est pas une rodomontade. C'est le projet et l'objectif de guerre de la Russie en Ukraine - une guerre dont ils ont déjà admis qu'elle sera longue.

Ce projet réussira t il, ou pas, l'avenir est ouvert. Mais contrairement aux éructations d'un Solovyov, le propagandiste qui veut chaque jour propose d'atomiser un pays différent, c'est tout à fait sérieux :mellow:

  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Le 11/06/2023 à 15:59, Heorl a dit :

Je ne suis pas d'accord avec cette analyse. L'appareil d'État russe semble réellement empreint d'une idéologie assez simple qui peut se résumer en ces termes :

[...]

Coïncidence, je viens de voir cette critique de lecture qui couvre le sujet : https://www.washingtonpost.com/books/2023/06/12/russia-war-ukraine-mcglynn/

Révélation

What we’ve misunderstood about Russian motivations for the war in Ukraine

Two new books by Jade McGlynn make the disturbing case for why Russia’s invasion had a convincing historical logic to it

At least some of the West’s disbelief over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in 2022 came from the absurdity of Vladimir Putin’s stated justifications. The threat of NATO expansion toward Russian borders? Surely, he knew that the alliance — chronically underfunded; brain dead, according to French President Emmanuel Macron; and postured for deterrence — posed no peril to Russia. The presence of Nazis in Ukraine? True, a handful of Ukrainians recall their joint anti-Soviet operations alongside the Wehrmacht with a discomforting pride. Still, a nation that had freely elected a Jewish president seemed an odd candidate to revive Nazism as a political force.

To Western eyes, therefore, the invasion appeared to make no sense. But in two new books, Russia analyst Jade McGlynn presents a powerful and disturbing case that the invasion had a convincing historical logic to it, for Vladimir Putin and for Russians more generally. In “Memory Makers: The Politics of the Past in Putin’s Russia,” she argues that the invasion was “perhaps the only possible outcome of Russia’s preoccupation with policing the past.” In “Russia’s War,” she shows how deeply and fully the Russian people have accepted the historical narrative justifying this war. Taken together, the two books suggest that we have been looking in the wrong places to understand Russian motivations.

The Russian historical narrative, according to McGlynn, posits that when the state is strong and the people united, Russia achieves greatness, such as defeating Nazi Germany and launching Sputnik. When the state is weak and the people disunited, as under Boris Yeltsin, the West exploits and weakens Russia and its people. Russian media thus treat Western support for Ukraine not as a response to the invasion of Crimea in 2014 but as a long part of a Western “war” to keep Russia weak and therefore exploitable. Why else, Russians ask, would a debauched West support Ukrainian Nazis if not to use Ukraine as a proxy for perpetuating the West’s centuries-long quest to keep Russia weak and divided?

McGlynn argues that it is a mistake to dismiss this policing of the past as mere propaganda or brainwashing. She argues that the regime uses history to “develop cognitive filters and heuristics” that create comfortable spaces for framing the present. Key themes include the insistence that Ukraine has always been an extension of Russia, never a nation in its own right, and that the Russian state has played a key role in protecting the Russian people from the persistent existential dangers that lurk outside the country’s borders.

The Russian state has used a heavy hand to enforce its view of the past, firing or imprisoning many of those who disagree with it. But as McGlynn shows in “Russia’s War,” the most effective methods are much more subtle. What she describes as “agitainment” in television news and a tightly controlled internet blur the line between fact and fiction. Popular literature and entertaining feature films, many of them funded by the state or developed by influential figures including the media star Vladimir Solovyov and the former culture minister Vladimir Medinsky, promote “correct” historical themes such as Russian heroism and sacrifice. Multiple generations have internalized these narratives through school curriculums laden with tales of Western perfidy and historically grounded messianic narratives from the Russian Orthodox Church. This framing resonates with ordinary Russians, in part because it offers a heroic past to a people whose present and future are so precarious. It also offers a neat and tidy explanation (namely, the consistent enmity of the West) for Russia’s numerous shortcomings.

As McGlynn points out in “Memory Makers,” when history is rooted in an aberrant view of the past, the present is turned on its head. The Russian “heroes” fighting in Ukraine today are marching in the footsteps of the heroes of past generations and restoring Russia to the greatness that is — because of its glorious history — its true birthright. Russia becomes David, fighting the Goliath of Ukrainian Nazism masterminded by an all-powerful and incurably Russophobic West. History “proves” that the West is in terminal decline, while Russia is on a path to return to its natural position of global leadership. Russian soldiers are not agents of aggression and mass murder; rather, they are heroically defending Russians everywhere from a genocidal Ukrainian regime intent on killing them with bioweapons provided by the CIA. Taken to its illogical extreme, Russia is liberating Ukrainians from the degenerate Westerners tricking them into turning against their Russian brothers.

The war in Ukraine that McGlynn ruefully describes is therefore “Russia’s war,” not just Putin’s war. The Russian people, like those she came to know during her many years of studying Russia and living there, either support the war or at least identify with the historical justifications underpinning it. In the end, however, public support does not really matter. Unlike the West, where democratically elected leaders seek the support of the people they lead into war, Putin only needs their apathy or political neutrality. Their agreement with a common narrative of events is a more-than-adequate substitute for their active support.

In a tightly controlled dictatorship like Putin’s Russia, there is no possibility for an independent civil society to present alternative viewpoints, engage citizens in free discussion or search for sources to assess the government’s messaging. The result is not history as debate but history as a performative act of patriotism and a weaponized justification for an unprovoked war against a neighbor. As if to prove McGlynn’s point, historically based justifications for Russian policy and alleged plots by the West form terrifyingly explicit parts of Russia’s most recent National Security Strategy. Her insightful and creative analysis suggests that we are in for a long conflict not just over the fate of Ukraine, but also over how differing memories of the past will continue to shape the future.

Michael S. Neiberg is the chair of war studies and a professor of history at the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pa. He is the author, most recently, of “When France Fell: The Vichy Crisis and the Fate of the Anglo-American Alliance.”

Remarques persos sur les passages soulignés :

1) une lecture sélective qui oublie la grande terreur et ses conséquences pour les Soviétiques, ou dans le cas Ieltsine omet le rôle de Russes (les oligarques et les corrompus) dans les malheurs du pays.

2) j'ai du mal à comprendre le paradoxe entre les efforts faits pour faire adhérer la population à ce "roman national" et le fait qu'on se contente de son apathie. Et puis c'est zapper la question des désertions, de l'émigration... Ca montre que les Russes ne sont pas tellement adhérents au roman ni apathiques, mais que leur pouvoir d'action est très limité en options (Poutine leur ayant totalement retiré celle de pouvoir remettre en cause certaines de ses décisions).

3) c'est bien beau l'historiographie, mais en plus terre à terre on est surtout partis pour un long conflit en relations internationales, qui dépasse la question du sort de l'Ukraine et pourrait bien durer au-delà. Cela va sans dire, mais ca va mieux en le disant.

  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Un détail sans doute, mais un détail qui en dit long.

Le Burdj Khalifa, l'immeuble le plus élevé au monde, situé aux Emirats, pavoisait aujourd'hui aux couleurs de la Russie, à l'occasion de leur fête nationale

 

 

Ce n'est vraiment pas anti occidental les Emirats. Mais c'est au Sud. Et le Sud ne rejoint vraiment pas la campagne occidentale contre la Russie 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 5 heures, Alexis a dit :

Un détail sans doute, mais un détail qui en dit long.

Le Burdj Khalifa, l'immeuble le plus élevé au monde, situé aux Emirats, pavoisait aujourd'hui aux couleurs de la Russie, à l'occasion de leur fête nationale

 

 

Ce n'est vraiment pas anti occidental les Emirats. Mais c'est au Sud. Et le Sud ne rejoint vraiment pas la campagne occidentale contre la Russie 

On appelle de la realpolitik. Si demain Moscou tombe, ils seront tous pro-ukrainiens depuis ta naissance. :happy:

  • Haha 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a une heure, Ciders a dit :

On appelle de la realpolitik. Si demain Moscou tombe, ils seront tous pro-ukrainiens depuis ta naissance. :happy:

Tout à fait. D'ailleurs, le Burdj Khalifa est pavoisé aux couleurs de l'Ukraine quand c'est la fête nationale ukrainienne.

The-Worlds-Largest-Skyscraper-Shone-Blue

Aux Emirats comme dans la grande majorité des pays au monde, on n'est ni pour ni contre bien au contraire. Ou plus précisément on est à la fois pour la Russie et pour l'Ukraine, sans oublier la paix, la souveraineté, l'équilibre et les ptits zoziaux qui chantent. C'est-à-dire bien sûr qu'on est avant tout pour sa pomme, et pourquoi faire des dépenses ou des efforts quelconques pour un sujet dont on n'a au fond rien à secouer ?

Seuls la plupart des pays de l'OTAN - moins la Turquie et peut-être la Hongrie - ainsi que Biélorussie, Corée du Nord, Iran et Syrie ne font pas de realpolitik. Ou alors en font autrement, si on veut. Un bon 12% de la population mondiale, tout mouillé.

  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 32 minutes, Alexis a dit :

Tout à fait. D'ailleurs, le Burdj Khalifa est pavoisé aux couleurs de l'Ukraine quand c'est la fête nationale ukrainienne.

The-Worlds-Largest-Skyscraper-Shone-Blue

Aux Emirats comme dans la grande majorité des pays au monde, on n'est ni pour ni contre bien au contraire. Ou plus précisément on est à la fois pour la Russie et pour l'Ukraine, sans oublier la paix, la souveraineté, l'équilibre et les ptits zoziaux qui chantent. C'est-à-dire bien sûr qu'on est avant tout pour sa pomme, et pourquoi faire des dépenses ou des efforts quelconques pour un sujet dont on n'a au fond rien à secouer ?

Seuls la plupart des pays de l'OTAN - moins la Turquie et peut-être la Hongrie - ainsi que Biélorussie, Corée du Nord, Iran et Syrie ne font pas de realpolitik. Ou alors en font autrement, si on veut. Un bon 12% de la population mondiale, tout mouillé.

Tu oublies le Mali et la Centrafrique. C'est grave.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 mai 2023

Dans le "mouvement des non-alignés", il y a aussi Fikile Mbalula, le secrétaire général de l'ANC, le parti au pouvoir en Afrique du Sud qui était l'autre jour à la BBC.

https://dia-algerie.com/le-sud-africain-fikile-mbalula-recadre-un-journaliste-de-la-bbc-a-propos-de-poutine-video/ (26 mai 2023)

Le secrétaire général du Congrès national africain (ANC) n’a pas mâché ses mots face à un journaliste de la BBC. Celui-ci l’a interrogé quant au mandat d’arrêt de la Cour pénale internationale (CPI) à l’encontre de Vladimir Poutine, procédure que devrait appliquer l’Afrique du Sud en tant que membre de l’instance. En réaction aux questions du correspondant qui ont suivi quant aux « crimes » imputés à M.Poutine par la CPI, le responsable sud-africain s’est montré ferme. Il a demandé à M.Sackur s’il croyait qu’il était possible d’arrêter un chef d’État dans n’importe quel lieu avant de lancer : Fikile Mbalula s’est par la suite penché sur les conséquences tragiques des guerres en Irak et en Afghanistan tout en rappelant que le Premier ministre britannique de l’époque, Tony Blair, n’avait toujours pas été arrêté pour avoir sciemment menti sur les armes de destruction massive en Irak et sur les millions de personnes qui ont été tuées dans la guerre en Irak. »Où sont les armes de destruction massive? », a-t-il ainsi interpellé le correspondant britannique.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://www.timeslive.co.za/politics/2023-05-29-from-weapon-smuggling-claims-to-anarchist-inside-steenhuisen-and-mbalulas-lady-r-war-of-words/ (29 mai 2023)

M. Steenhuisen commentait l'affirmation controversée de l'ambassadeur américain Reuben Brigety selon laquelle le navire russe Lady R, qui avait fait escale à Simon's Town à la fin de l'année dernière, avait quitté le pays chargé d'armes.

M. Ramaphosa a nommé un groupe indépendant dirigé par le juge Phineas Mathale Deon Mojapelo et comprenant les avocats Leah Gcabashe et Enver Surty pour enquêter sur les allégations concernant le navire russe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 4 heures, Alexis a dit :

Tout à fait. D'ailleurs, le Burdj Khalifa est pavoisé aux couleurs de l'Ukraine quand c'est la fête nationale ukrainienne.

The-Worlds-Largest-Skyscraper-Shone-Blue

Aux Emirats comme dans la grande majorité des pays au monde, on n'est ni pour ni contre bien au contraire. Ou plus précisément on est à la fois pour la Russie et pour l'Ukraine, sans oublier la paix, la souveraineté, l'équilibre et les ptits zoziaux qui chantent. C'est-à-dire bien sûr qu'on est avant tout pour sa pomme, et pourquoi faire des dépenses ou des efforts quelconques pour un sujet dont on n'a au fond rien à secouer ?

Seuls la plupart des pays de l'OTAN - moins la Turquie et peut-être la Hongrie - ainsi que Biélorussie, Corée du Nord, Iran et Syrie ne font pas de realpolitik. Ou alors en font autrement, si on veut. Un bon 12% de la population mondiale, tout mouillé.

Oui oui, je sais bien, le méchant Occident qui surréagit.

Il faut dire aussi que les intérêts vitaux des EAU ne sont pas menacés. Et qu'on a bien vu ce que ça donnait au Yémen par exemple. Le côté "Sud neutre", c'est du flan. Simplement, ils n'ont pas peur ici.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 9 minutes, Ciders a dit :

Oui oui, je sais bien, le méchant Occident qui surréagit.

Il faut dire aussi que les intérêts vitaux des EAU ne sont pas menacés. Et qu'on a bien vu ce que ça donnait au Yémen par exemple. Le côté "Sud neutre", c'est du flan. Simplement, ils n'ont pas peur ici.

C'est précisément ce que je souligne. Comme disait Bonaparte : "La politique d'un pays est dans sa géographie"

On est neutre / indifférent en Amérique du Sud ou en Asie du Sud-Est au sujet de l'invasion de la Russie en Ukraine pour les mêmes raisons qu'on était neutre / indifférent en Europe ou en Amérique du Nord au sujet de l'invasion saoudienne-émiratie au Yémen, de l'invasion américaine en Irak (la France qui n'approuve pas à l'ONU la décision américaine d'attaquer, c'est faible au point de se rapprocher de la neutralité) ou de la guerre d'Ethiopie dans le Tigré... La géographie commande.

Enfin les Africains ne sont pas exactement indifférents tout de même... La question de savoir si les exportations alimentaires de l'Ukraine vont être gênées par la Russie, ou les exportations alimentaires de la Russie gênées par la guerre économique occidentale, ne leur est vraiment pas indifférente ! Mais seulement celle-là.

Après, personne n'a dit que l'Iran était méchant ni ne sur-réagissait quand il envoyait des armes aux Houthis, ni les Occidentaux quand ils envoient des armes aux Ukrainiens :smile: C'est une autre question

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 1 heure, Wallaby a dit :

23 mai 2023

Dans le "mouvement des non-alignés", il y a aussi Fikile Mbalula, le secrétaire général de l'ANC, le parti au pouvoir en Afrique du Sud qui était l'autre jour à la BBC.

https://dia-algerie.com/le-sud-africain-fikile-mbalula-recadre-un-journaliste-de-la-bbc-a-propos-de-poutine-video/ (26 mai 2023)

Le secrétaire général du Congrès national africain (ANC) n’a pas mâché ses mots face à un journaliste de la BBC. Celui-ci l’a interrogé quant au mandat d’arrêt de la Cour pénale internationale (CPI) à l’encontre de Vladimir Poutine, procédure que devrait appliquer l’Afrique du Sud en tant que membre de l’instance. En réaction aux questions du correspondant qui ont suivi quant aux « crimes » imputés à M.Poutine par la CPI, le responsable sud-africain s’est montré ferme. Il a demandé à M.Sackur s’il croyait qu’il était possible d’arrêter un chef d’État dans n’importe quel lieu avant de lancer : Fikile Mbalula s’est par la suite penché sur les conséquences tragiques des guerres en Irak et en Afghanistan tout en rappelant que le Premier ministre britannique de l’époque, Tony Blair, n’avait toujours pas été arrêté pour avoir sciemment menti sur les armes de destruction massive en Irak et sur les millions de personnes qui ont été tuées dans la guerre en Irak. »Où sont les armes de destruction massive? », a-t-il ainsi interpellé le correspondant britannique.

où sont les NAZI ?

Bref laissons les Russes bombarder les civils Ukrainiens puisque les US ont envahi l'Irak sous un faux prétexte.    L'Ukraine vend du blé à l'AS ...?   si c'est le cas elle devra s'interroger sur l'opportunité de continuer ou pas à en vendre .. à jouer au con .... certains Africains devraient réfléchir à 2 fois. Quand tu as faim  tu évites de te mettre a dos celui qui te donne à manger .... mais bon le gars à un égo à soigner, il s'en fiche un peu des soudanais  et des autres morts de faim ... pourvu qu'il  brille sous les caméras et que son ventre soit bien  rempli ...

Edited by GOUPIL
  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 22 heures, Alexis a dit :

Aux Emirats comme dans la grande majorité des pays au monde, on n'est ni pour ni contre bien au contraire. Ou plus précisément on est à la fois pour la Russie et pour l'Ukraine, sans oublier la paix, la souveraineté, l'équilibre et les ptits zoziaux qui chantent. C'est-à-dire bien sûr qu'on est avant tout pour sa pomme, et pourquoi faire des dépenses ou des efforts quelconques pour un sujet dont on n'a au fond rien à secouer ?

Seuls la plupart des pays de l'OTAN - moins la Turquie et peut-être la Hongrie - ainsi que Biélorussie, Corée du Nord, Iran et Syrie ne font pas de realpolitik. Ou alors en font autrement, si on veut. Un bon 12% de la population mondiale, tout mouillé.

mouis, d'un autre côté la France (enfin : les industriels français) ont tout de même livré du matériel militaire à la Russie jusqu'en mars 2020 (livraison France -> Russie ) malgré la Syrie, malgré le Donbass, malgré la Crimée, malgré Wagner en Afrique,... C'était aussi plutôt pour notre pomme, hélas.

Malgré le Hollande-bashing fréquent, il faut tout de même lui reconnaître le courage d'avoir annuler la livraison des Mistral à Poutine. Rien que d'imaginer ce qu'aurait pu en faire Poutine en février 2022..brrrrrr 

  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

il y a 29 minutes, FredLab a dit :

Malgré le Hollande-bashing fréquent, il faut tout de même lui reconnaître le courage d'avoir annuler la livraison des Mistral à Poutine. Rien que d'imaginer ce qu'aurait pu en faire Poutine en février 2022..brrrrrr 

Une cible pour les Ukrainiens ? Un récif artificiel en mer noire?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 4 heures, FredLab a dit :

mouis, d'un autre côté la France (enfin : les industriels français) ont tout de même livré du matériel militaire à la Russie jusqu'en mars 2020 (livraison France -> Russie ) malgré la Syrie, malgré le Donbass, malgré la Crimée, malgré Wagner en Afrique,... C'était aussi plutôt pour notre pomme, hélas.

Malgré le Hollande-bashing fréquent, il faut tout de même lui reconnaître le courage d'avoir annuler la livraison des Mistral à Poutine. Rien que d'imaginer ce qu'aurait pu en faire Poutine en février 2022..brrrrrr 

Lorsque je fais remarquer que la plupart des pays sont indifférents à la guerre Russie Ukraine, je ne fais aucun reproche à personne.

Nous faisons exactement la même chose : pas de guerre économique contre l'Arabie quand elle attaque le Yémen, ni contre l'Amérique quand elle attaque l'Irak. Loin des yeux, loin du cœur, pour eux comme pour nous. 

En ce qui concerne la continuation après 2014 des contrats d'armement avec la Russie déjà existants, il n'y avait pas d'incohérence dans la position de la France, étant donné qu'elle avait décidé en Conseil européen qu'elle ne passerait pas de nouveau contrat d'armement avec la Russie. Il n'y avait eu aucune décision de mettre fin aux contrats en cours. 

Les Mistral étaient une exception à cette décision, rien de plus 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://unherd.com/2023/06/south-africas-infinite-humiliation/

Le sommet pourrait être déplacé en Chine, devenir virtuel ou se tenir en Afrique du Sud en présence d'un Poutine immunisé, auquel cas les États-Unis excluront certainement l'Afrique du Sud des avantages de l'AGOA (Africa Growth Opportunity Act), qui permet aux exportateurs sud-africains, principalement agricoles, d'accéder librement aux marchés américains. En effet, un groupe bipartisan de membres du Congrès a demandé à Washington d'exclure l'Afrique du Sud dès maintenant. L'une des principales banques du pays a, quant à elle, averti que le gouvernement mettait en péril jusqu'à 32 milliards de rands de commerce extérieur en raison de son alliance avec la Russie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://carnegieendowment.org/politika/89944 (12 juin 2023)

Les espoirs des dirigeants ukrainiens de réussir leur contre-offensive se sont accompagnés d'une réflexion sérieuse sur la manière de réintégrer les zones actuellement occupées, ainsi que d'un débat acharné sur la manière de traiter les Ukrainiens devenus des ressortissants russes et sur la distinction à établir entre collaborateur et victime de l'occupation.

Kiev n'a pas encore répondu clairement à ces questions. Alors que le médiateur ukrainien pour les droits de l'homme, Dmytro Lubinets, a conseillé aux personnes sous occupation d'accepter la nationalité russe si nécessaire pour se protéger des représailles, la position du ministère de la réintégration des territoires temporairement occupés est que la naturalisation équivaut à une collaboration.

Entre-temps, la pression exercée sur les habitants pour qu'ils acquièrent la citoyenneté russe est de plus en plus forte. En mars, le président Vladimir Poutine a simplifié la procédure de renonciation à la citoyenneté ukrainienne. En avril, il a rendu légale, à partir de l'année prochaine, l'expulsion des Ukrainiens qui refusent la citoyenneté russe. Les élections de septembre permettront de tester le succès de cette assimilation administrative et la loyauté des nouveaux citoyens russes.

Russie Unie n'est pas le seul parti russe à se préparer à se présenter dans l'Ukraine occupée. Il en va de même pour les partis d'opposition russes "dans le système" (c'est-à-dire représentés au parlement). Le Parti communiste de la Fédération de Russie (KPRF) est bien implanté dans le Donbas depuis que le Parti communiste ukrainien a été interdit en 2014. Son réseau de branches régionales dans l'Ukraine occupée a succédé aux partis communistes de la DNR et de la LNR (même si, sous le régime séparatiste, ils n'ont jamais figuré sur un bulletin de vote). Dans les régions de Zaporizhzhia et de Kherson, des sections du KPRF prennent forme.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://quincyinst.org/report/defense-contractor-funded-think-tanks-dominate-ukraine-debate/#lack-of-transparency-at-many-think-tanks-and-media-outlets (1er juin 2023)

Les médias analysés ici n'ont pas non plus fourni à leurs lecteurs la moindre indication sur les conflits d'intérêts potentiels posés par les experts des groupes de réflexion soutenus par l'industrie de la défense qui commentent l'industrie de la défense. En fait, aucune des mentions médiatiques analysées ici n'incluait la divulgation du financement par l'industrie de la défense de ces groupes de réflexion qui, parfois, recommandaient des politiques susceptibles de bénéficier financièrement à leurs bailleurs de fonds. L'exemple le plus flagrant est peut-être celui d'une étude du CSIS qui recommande la création d'une "réserve stratégique de munitions", ce qui serait une aubaine pour les fabricants d'armes, et qui a été citée dans de nombreux médias, dont le Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg et Defense News. Aucun de ces articles ne mentionne les millions que le CSIS a reçus de l'industrie de l'armement, notamment de Lockheed Martin, qui a déjà reçu des centaines de millions de dollars en contrats liés à l'Ukraine et dont le PDG est même cité dans le rapport du CSIS. En fin de compte, cela indique un manque de jugement de la part des principaux médias qui traitent des questions vitales de la guerre et de la paix en Ukraine.

Les médias devraient adopter une norme professionnelle pour signaler tout conflit d'intérêt avec les sources qui discutent de la politique étrangère des États-Unis. En ne fournissant pas ces informations, les médias trompent leurs lecteurs, auditeurs ou téléspectateurs. Ces informations fournissent un contexte important pour l'évaluation des commentaires d'experts et sont, sans doute, aussi importantes que les commentaires eux-mêmes.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Il y a 3 heures, Wallaby a dit :

https://carnegieendowment.org/politika/89944 (12 juin 2023)

(...) Entre-temps, la pression exercée sur les habitants pour qu'ils acquièrent la citoyenneté russe est de plus en plus forte. En mars, le président Vladimir Poutine a simplifié la procédure de renonciation à la citoyenneté ukrainienne. En avril, il a rendu légale, à partir de l'année prochaine, l'expulsion des Ukrainiens qui refusent la citoyenneté russe. Les élections de septembre permettront de tester le succès de cette assimilation administrative et la loyauté des nouveaux citoyens russes.

C'est surtout la participation au vote qui sera significative de ce point de vue. Surtout du fait qu'aux dernières nouvelles - à moins qu'ils ne changent quelque chose ? - le vote n'est pas obligatoire en Russie, et il n'y a pas d'inconvénient particulier à ne pas voter.

Le score de chaque parti en tant que tel ne voudra pas dire grand chose. Voter pour "Système central" c'est-à-dire Russie unie, "Système ballast gauche" le parti communiste ou "Système ballast droit" le successeur de Jirinovski, ça ne fait pas tant de différence que ça en pratique.

Maintenant, reste à savoir si une information crédible sur le taux de participation filtrera...

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • pascal locked this topic
  • pascal unlocked this topic

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Forum Statistics

    21.5k
    Total Topics
    1.7m
    Total Posts
  • Blog Statistics

    4
    Total Blogs
    3
    Total Entries
×
×
  • Create New...